Speeches (Lines) for Roderigo
in "Othello"

Total: 59

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,2

(stage directions). [Enter RODERIGO and IAGO]

Roderigo. Tush! never tell me; I take it much unkindly
That thou, Iago, who hast had my purse
As if the strings were thine, shouldst know of this.


2

I,1,7

Iago. 'Sblood, but you will not hear me:
If ever I did dream of such a matter, Abhor me.

Roderigo. Thou told'st me thou didst hold him in thy hate.


3

I,1,34

Iago. Despise me, if I do not. Three great ones of the city,
In personal suit to make me his lieutenant,
Off-capp'd to him: and, by the faith of man,
I know my price, I am worth no worse a place:
But he; as loving his own pride and purposes,
Evades them, with a bombast circumstance
Horribly stuff'd with epithets of war;
And, in conclusion,
Nonsuits my mediators; for, 'Certes,' says he,
'I have already chose my officer.'
And what was he?
Forsooth, a great arithmetician,
One Michael Cassio, a Florentine,
A fellow almost damn'd in a fair wife;
That never set a squadron in the field,
Nor the division of a battle knows
More than a spinster; unless the bookish theoric,
Wherein the toged consuls can propose
As masterly as he: mere prattle, without practise,
Is all his soldiership. But he, sir, had the election:
And I, of whom his eyes had seen the proof
At Rhodes, at Cyprus and on other grounds
Christian and heathen, must be be-lee'd and calm'd
By debitor and creditor: this counter-caster,
He, in good time, must his lieutenant be,
And I—God bless the mark!—his Moorship's ancient.

Roderigo. By heaven, I rather would have been his hangman.


4

I,1,41

Iago. Why, there's no remedy; 'tis the curse of service,
Preferment goes by letter and affection,
And not by old gradation, where each second
Stood heir to the first. Now, sir, be judge yourself,
Whether I in any just term am affined
To love the Moor.

Roderigo. I would not follow him then.


5

I,1,68

Iago. O, sir, content you;
I follow him to serve my turn upon him:
We cannot all be masters, nor all masters
Cannot be truly follow'd. You shall mark
Many a duteous and knee-crooking knave,
That, doting on his own obsequious bondage,
Wears out his time, much like his master's ass,
For nought but provender, and when he's old, cashier'd:
Whip me such honest knaves. Others there are
Who, trimm'd in forms and visages of duty,
Keep yet their hearts attending on themselves,
And, throwing but shows of service on their lords,
Do well thrive by them and when they have lined
their coats
Do themselves homage: these fellows have some soul;
And such a one do I profess myself. For, sir,
It is as sure as you are Roderigo,
Were I the Moor, I would not be Iago:
In following him, I follow but myself;
Heaven is my judge, not I for love and duty,
But seeming so, for my peculiar end:
For when my outward action doth demonstrate
The native act and figure of my heart
In compliment extern, 'tis not long after
But I will wear my heart upon my sleeve
For daws to peck at: I am not what I am.

Roderigo. What a full fortune does the thicklips owe
If he can carry't thus!


6

I,1,77

Iago. Call up her father,
Rouse him: make after him, poison his delight,
Proclaim him in the streets; incense her kinsmen,
And, though he in a fertile climate dwell,
Plague him with flies: though that his joy be joy,
Yet throw such changes of vexation on't,
As it may lose some colour.

Roderigo. Here is her father's house; I'll call aloud.


7

I,1,81

Iago. Do, with like timorous accent and dire yell
As when, by night and negligence, the fire
Is spied in populous cities.

Roderigo. What, ho, Brabantio! Signior Brabantio, ho!


8

I,1,88

Brabantio. What is the reason of this terrible summons?
What is the matter there?

Roderigo. Signior, is all your family within?


9

I,1,100

Brabantio. What, have you lost your wits?

Roderigo. Most reverend signior, do you know my voice?


10

I,1,102

Brabantio. Not I. what are you?

Roderigo. My name is Roderigo.


11

I,1,110

Brabantio. The worser welcome:
I have charged thee not to haunt about my doors:
In honest plainness thou hast heard me say
My daughter is not for thee; and now, in madness,
Being full of supper and distempering draughts,
Upon malicious bravery, dost thou come
To start my quiet.

Roderigo. Sir, sir, sir,—


12

I,1,114

Brabantio. But thou must needs be sure
My spirit and my place have in them power
To make this bitter to thee.

Roderigo. Patience, good sir.


13

I,1,117

Brabantio. What tell'st thou me of robbing? this is Venice;
My house is not a grange.

Roderigo. Most grave Brabantio,
In simple and pure soul I come to you.


14

I,1,131

Brabantio. This thou shalt answer; I know thee, Roderigo.

Roderigo. Sir, I will answer any thing. But, I beseech you,
If't be your pleasure and most wise consent,
As partly I find it is, that your fair daughter,
At this odd-even and dull watch o' the night,
Transported, with no worse nor better guard
But with a knave of common hire, a gondolier,
To the gross clasps of a lascivious Moor—
If this be known to you and your allowance,
We then have done you bold and saucy wrongs;
But if you know not this, my manners tell me
We have your wrong rebuke. Do not believe
That, from the sense of all civility,
I thus would play and trifle with your reverence:
Your daughter, if you have not given her leave,
I say again, hath made a gross revolt;
Tying her duty, beauty, wit and fortunes
In an extravagant and wheeling stranger
Of here and every where. Straight satisfy yourself:
If she be in her chamber or your house,
Let loose on me the justice of the state
For thus deluding you.


15

I,1,184

Brabantio. It is too true an evil: gone she is;
And what's to come of my despised time
Is nought but bitterness. Now, Roderigo,
Where didst thou see her? O unhappy girl!
With the Moor, say'st thou? Who would be a father!
How didst thou know 'twas she? O she deceives me
Past thought! What said she to you? Get more tapers:
Raise all my kindred. Are they married, think you?

Roderigo. Truly, I think they are.


16

I,1,191

Brabantio. O heaven! How got she out? O treason of the blood!
Fathers, from hence trust not your daughters' minds
By what you see them act. Is there not charms
By which the property of youth and maidhood
May be abused? Have you not read, Roderigo,
Of some such thing?

Roderigo. Yes, sir, I have indeed.


17

I,1,195

Brabantio. Call up my brother. O, would you had had her!
Some one way, some another. Do you know
Where we may apprehend her and the Moor?

Roderigo. I think I can discover him, if you please,
To get good guard and go along with me.


18

I,2,275

Othello. Holla! stand there!

Roderigo. Signior, it is the Moor.


19

I,3,660

(stage directions). [Exeunt OTHELLO and DESDEMONA]

Roderigo. Iago,—


20

I,3,662

Iago. What say'st thou, noble heart?

Roderigo. What will I do, thinkest thou?


21

I,3,664

Iago. Why, go to bed, and sleep.

Roderigo. I will incontinently drown myself.


22

I,3,667

Iago. If thou dost, I shall never love thee after. Why,
thou silly gentleman!

Roderigo. It is silliness to live when to live is torment; and
then have we a prescription to die when death is our physician.


23

I,3,675

Iago. O villainous! I have looked upon the world for four
times seven years; and since I could distinguish
betwixt a benefit and an injury, I never found man
that knew how to love himself. Ere I would say, I
would drown myself for the love of a guinea-hen, I
would change my humanity with a baboon.

Roderigo. What should I do? I confess it is my shame to be so
fond; but it is not in my virtue to amend it.


24

I,3,692

Iago. Virtue! a fig! 'tis in ourselves that we are thus
or thus. Our bodies are our gardens, to the which
our wills are gardeners: so that if we will plant
nettles, or sow lettuce, set hyssop and weed up
thyme, supply it with one gender of herbs, or
distract it with many, either to have it sterile
with idleness, or manured with industry, why, the
power and corrigible authority of this lies in our
wills. If the balance of our lives had not one
scale of reason to poise another of sensuality, the
blood and baseness of our natures would conduct us
to most preposterous conclusions: but we have
reason to cool our raging motions, our carnal
stings, our unbitted lusts, whereof I take this that
you call love to be a sect or scion.

Roderigo. It cannot be.


25

I,3,721

Iago. It is merely a lust of the blood and a permission of
the will. Come, be a man. Drown thyself! drown
cats and blind puppies. I have professed me thy
friend and I confess me knit to thy deserving with
cables of perdurable toughness; I could never
better stead thee than now. Put money in thy
purse; follow thou the wars; defeat thy favour with
an usurped beard; I say, put money in thy purse. It
cannot be that Desdemona should long continue her
love to the Moor,— put money in thy purse,—nor he
his to her: it was a violent commencement, and thou
shalt see an answerable sequestration:—put but
money in thy purse. These Moors are changeable in
their wills: fill thy purse with money:—the food
that to him now is as luscious as locusts, shall be
to him shortly as bitter as coloquintida. She must
change for youth: when she is sated with his body,
she will find the error of her choice: she must
have change, she must: therefore put money in thy
purse. If thou wilt needs damn thyself, do it a
more delicate way than drowning. Make all the money
thou canst: if sanctimony and a frail vow betwixt
an erring barbarian and a supersubtle Venetian not
too hard for my wits and all the tribe of hell, thou
shalt enjoy her; therefore make money. A pox of
drowning thyself! it is clean out of the way: seek
thou rather to be hanged in compassing thy joy than
to be drowned and go without her.

Roderigo. Wilt thou be fast to my hopes, if I depend on
the issue?


26

I,3,732

Iago. Thou art sure of me:—go, make money:—I have told
thee often, and I re-tell thee again and again, I
hate the Moor: my cause is hearted; thine hath no
less reason. Let us be conjunctive in our revenge
against him: if thou canst cuckold him, thou dost
thyself a pleasure, me a sport. There are many
events in the womb of time which will be delivered.
Traverse! go, provide thy money. We will have more
of this to-morrow. Adieu.

Roderigo. Where shall we meet i' the morning?


27

I,3,734

Iago. At my lodging.

Roderigo. I'll be with thee betimes.


28

I,3,736

Iago. Go to; farewell. Do you hear, Roderigo?

Roderigo. What say you?


29

I,3,738

Iago. No more of drowning, do you hear?

Roderigo. I am changed: I'll go sell all my land.


30

II,1,1018

Iago. Do thou meet me presently at the harbour. Come
hither. If thou be'st valiant,— as, they say, base
men being in love have then a nobility in their
natures more than is native to them—list me. The
lieutenant tonight watches on the court of
guard:—first, I must tell thee this—Desdemona is
directly in love with him.

Roderigo. With him! why, 'tis not possible.


31

II,1,1049

Iago. Lay thy finger thus, and let thy soul be instructed.
Mark me with what violence she first loved the Moor,
but for bragging and telling her fantastical lies:
and will she love him still for prating? let not
thy discreet heart think it. Her eye must be fed;
and what delight shall she have to look on the
devil? When the blood is made dull with the act of
sport, there should be, again to inflame it and to
give satiety a fresh appetite, loveliness in favour,
sympathy in years, manners and beauties; all which
the Moor is defective in: now, for want of these
required conveniences, her delicate tenderness will
find itself abused, begin to heave the gorge,
disrelish and abhor the Moor; very nature will
instruct her in it and compel her to some second
choice. Now, sir, this granted,—as it is a most
pregnant and unforced position—who stands so
eminent in the degree of this fortune as Cassio
does? a knave very voluble; no further
conscionable than in putting on the mere form of
civil and humane seeming, for the better compassing
of his salt and most hidden loose affection? why,
none; why, none: a slipper and subtle knave, a
finder of occasions, that has an eye can stamp and
counterfeit advantages, though true advantage never
present itself; a devilish knave. Besides, the
knave is handsome, young, and hath all those
requisites in him that folly and green minds look
after: a pestilent complete knave; and the woman
hath found him already.

Roderigo. I cannot believe that in her; she's full of
most blessed condition.


32

II,1,1056

Iago. Blessed fig's-end! the wine she drinks is made of
grapes: if she had been blessed, she would never
have loved the Moor. Blessed pudding! Didst thou
not see her paddle with the palm of his hand? didst
not mark that?

Roderigo. Yes, that I did; but that was but courtesy.


33

II,1,1071

Iago. Lechery, by this hand; an index and obscure prologue
to the history of lust and foul thoughts. They met
so near with their lips that their breaths embraced
together. Villanous thoughts, Roderigo! when these
mutualities so marshal the way, hard at hand comes
the master and main exercise, the incorporate
conclusion, Pish! But, sir, be you ruled by me: I
have brought you from Venice. Watch you to-night;
for the command, I'll lay't upon you. Cassio knows
you not. I'll not be far from you: do you find
some occasion to anger Cassio, either by speaking
too loud, or tainting his discipline; or from what
other course you please, which the time shall more
favourably minister.

Roderigo. Well.


34

II,1,1081

Iago. Sir, he is rash and very sudden in choler, and haply
may strike at you: provoke him, that he may; for
even out of that will I cause these of Cyprus to
mutiny; whose qualification shall come into no true
taste again but by the displanting of Cassio. So
shall you have a shorter journey to your desires by
the means I shall then have to prefer them; and the
impediment most profitably removed, without the
which there were no expectation of our prosperity.

Roderigo. I will do this, if I can bring it to any
opportunity.


35

II,1,1085

Iago. I warrant thee. Meet me by and by at the citadel:
I must fetch his necessaries ashore. Farewell.

Roderigo. Adieu.


36

II,3,1286

Cassio. A knave teach me my duty!
I'll beat the knave into a twiggen bottle.

Roderigo. Beat me!


37

II,3,1517

Iago. And what's he then that says I play the villain?
When this advice is free I give and honest,
Probal to thinking and indeed the course
To win the Moor again? For 'tis most easy
The inclining Desdemona to subdue
In any honest suit: she's framed as fruitful
As the free elements. And then for her
To win the Moor—were't to renounce his baptism,
All seals and symbols of redeemed sin,
His soul is so enfetter'd to her love,
That she may make, unmake, do what she list,
Even as her appetite shall play the god
With his weak function. How am I then a villain
To counsel Cassio to this parallel course,
Directly to his good? Divinity of hell!
When devils will the blackest sins put on,
They do suggest at first with heavenly shows,
As I do now: for whiles this honest fool
Plies Desdemona to repair his fortunes
And she for him pleads strongly to the Moor,
I'll pour this pestilence into his ear,
That she repeals him for her body's lust;
And by how much she strives to do him good,
She shall undo her credit with the Moor.
So will I turn her virtue into pitch,
And out of her own goodness make the net
That shall enmesh them all.
[Re-enter RODERIGO]
How now, Roderigo!

Roderigo. I do follow here in the chase, not like a hound that
hunts, but one that fills up the cry. My money is
almost spent; I have been to-night exceedingly well
cudgelled; and I think the issue will be, I shall
have so much experience for my pains, and so, with
no money at all and a little more wit, return again to Venice.


38

IV,2,2946

Iago. 'Tis but so, I warrant.
[Trumpets within]
Hark, how these instruments summon to supper!
The messengers of Venice stay the meat;
Go in, and weep not; all things shall be well.
[Exeunt DESDEMONA and EMILIA]
[Enter RODERIGO]
How now, Roderigo!

Roderigo. I do not find that thou dealest justly with me.


39

IV,2,2948

Iago. What in the contrary?

Roderigo. Every day thou daffest me with some device, Iago;
and rather, as it seems to me now, keepest from me
all conveniency than suppliest me with the least
advantage of hope. I will indeed no longer endure
it, nor am I yet persuaded to put up in peace what
already I have foolishly suffered.


40

IV,2,2955

Iago. Will you hear me, Roderigo?

Roderigo. 'Faith, I have heard too much, for your words and
performances are no kin together.


41

IV,2,2958

Iago. You charge me most unjustly.

Roderigo. With nought but truth. I have wasted myself out of
my means. The jewels you have had from me to
deliver to Desdemona would half have corrupted a
votarist: you have told me she hath received them
and returned me expectations and comforts of sudden
respect and acquaintance, but I find none.


42

IV,2,2965

Iago. Well; go to; very well.

Roderigo. Very well! go to! I cannot go to, man; nor 'tis
not very well: nay, I think it is scurvy, and begin
to find myself fobbed in it.


43

IV,2,2969

Iago. Very well.

Roderigo. I tell you 'tis not very well. I will make myself
known to Desdemona: if she will return me my
jewels, I will give over my suit and repent my
unlawful solicitation; if not, assure yourself I
will seek satisfaction of you.


44

IV,2,2975

Iago. You have said now.

Roderigo. Ay, and said nothing but what I protest intendment of doing.


45

IV,2,2981

Iago. Why, now I see there's mettle in thee, and even from
this instant to build on thee a better opinion than
ever before. Give me thy hand, Roderigo: thou hast
taken against me a most just exception; but yet, I
protest, I have dealt most directly in thy affair.

Roderigo. It hath not appeared.


46

IV,2,2990

Iago. I grant indeed it hath not appeared, and your
suspicion is not without wit and judgment. But,
Roderigo, if thou hast that in thee indeed, which I
have greater reason to believe now than ever, I mean
purpose, courage and valour, this night show it: if
thou the next night following enjoy not Desdemona,
take me from this world with treachery and devise
engines for my life.

Roderigo. Well, what is it? is it within reason and compass?


47

IV,2,2993

Iago. Sir, there is especial commission come from Venice
to depute Cassio in Othello's place.

Roderigo. Is that true? why, then Othello and Desdemona
return again to Venice.


48

IV,2,2999

Iago. O, no; he goes into Mauritania and takes away with
him the fair Desdemona, unless his abode be
lingered here by some accident: wherein none can be
so determinate as the removing of Cassio.

Roderigo. How do you mean, removing of him?


49

IV,2,3002

Iago. Why, by making him uncapable of Othello's place;
knocking out his brains.

Roderigo. And that you would have me to do?


50

IV,2,3015

Iago. Ay, if you dare do yourself a profit and a right.
He sups to-night with a harlotry, and thither will I
go to him: he knows not yet of his horrorable
fortune. If you will watch his going thence, which
I will fashion to fall out between twelve and one,
you may take him at your pleasure: I will be near
to second your attempt, and he shall fall between
us. Come, stand not amazed at it, but go along with
me; I will show you such a necessity in his death
that you shall think yourself bound to put it on
him. It is now high suppertime, and the night grows
to waste: about it.

Roderigo. I will hear further reason for this.


51

V,1,3141

Iago. Here, stand behind this bulk; straight will he come:
Wear thy good rapier bare, and put it home:
Quick, quick; fear nothing; I'll be at thy elbow:
It makes us, or it mars us; think on that,
And fix most firm thy resolution.

Roderigo. Be near at hand; I may miscarry in't.


52

V,1,3144

(stage directions). [Retires]

Roderigo. I have no great devotion to the deed;
And yet he hath given me satisfying reasons:
'Tis but a man gone. Forth, my sword: he dies.


53

V,1,3160

(stage directions). [Enter CASSIO]

Roderigo. I know his gait, 'tis he.—Villain, thou diest!


54

V,1,3166

(stage directions). [Draws, and wounds RODERIGO]

Roderigo. O, I am slain!


55

V,1,3172

Othello. The voice of Cassio: Iago keeps his word.

Roderigo. O, villain that I am!


56

V,1,3187

Lodovico. Hark!

Roderigo. O wretched villain!


57

V,1,3191

Lodovico. Two or three groan: it is a heavy night:
These may be counterfeits: let's think't unsafe
To come in to the cry without more help.

Roderigo. Nobody come? then shall I bleed to death.


58

V,1,3211

(stage directions). [To LODOVICO and GRATIANO]

Roderigo. O, help me here!


59

V,1,3215

(stage directions). [Stabs RODERIGO]

Roderigo. O damn'd Iago! O inhuman dog!


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