Speeches (Lines) for Roderigo
in "Othello"

Total: 59

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,2

Tush! never tell me; I take it much unkindly
That thou, Iago, who hast had my purse
As if the strings were thine, shouldst know of this.

2

I,1,7

Thou told'st me thou didst hold him in thy hate.

3

I,1,34

By heaven, I rather would have been his hangman.

4

I,1,41

I would not follow him then.

5

I,1,68

What a full fortune does the thicklips owe
If he can carry't thus!

6

I,1,77

Here is her father's house; I'll call aloud.

7

I,1,81

What, ho, Brabantio! Signior Brabantio, ho!

8

I,1,88

Signior, is all your family within?

9

I,1,100

Most reverend signior, do you know my voice?

10

I,1,102

My name is Roderigo.

11

I,1,110

Sir, sir, sir,—

12

I,1,114

Patience, good sir.

13

I,1,117

Most grave Brabantio,
In simple and pure soul I come to you.

14

I,1,131

Sir, I will answer any thing. But, I beseech you,
If't be your pleasure and most wise consent,
As partly I find it is, that your fair daughter,
At this odd-even and dull watch o' the night,
Transported, with no worse nor better guard
But with a knave of common hire, a gondolier,
To the gross clasps of a lascivious Moor—
If this be known to you and your allowance,
We then have done you bold and saucy wrongs;
But if you know not this, my manners tell me
We have your wrong rebuke. Do not believe
That, from the sense of all civility,
I thus would play and trifle with your reverence:
Your daughter, if you have not given her leave,
I say again, hath made a gross revolt;
Tying her duty, beauty, wit and fortunes
In an extravagant and wheeling stranger
Of here and every where. Straight satisfy yourself:
If she be in her chamber or your house,
Let loose on me the justice of the state
For thus deluding you.

15

I,1,184

Truly, I think they are.

16

I,1,191

Yes, sir, I have indeed.

17

I,1,195

I think I can discover him, if you please,
To get good guard and go along with me.

18

I,2,275

Signior, it is the Moor.

19

I,3,660

Iago,—

20

I,3,662

What will I do, thinkest thou?

21

I,3,664

I will incontinently drown myself.

22

I,3,667

It is silliness to live when to live is torment; and
then have we a prescription to die when death is our physician.

23

I,3,675

What should I do? I confess it is my shame to be so
fond; but it is not in my virtue to amend it.

24

I,3,692

It cannot be.

25

I,3,721

Wilt thou be fast to my hopes, if I depend on
the issue?

26

I,3,732

Where shall we meet i' the morning?

27

I,3,734

I'll be with thee betimes.

28

I,3,736

What say you?

29

I,3,738

I am changed: I'll go sell all my land.

30

II,1,1018

With him! why, 'tis not possible.

31

II,1,1049

I cannot believe that in her; she's full of
most blessed condition.

32

II,1,1056

Yes, that I did; but that was but courtesy.

33

II,1,1071

Well.

34

II,1,1081

I will do this, if I can bring it to any
opportunity.

35

II,1,1085

Adieu.

36

II,3,1286

Beat me!

37

II,3,1517

I do follow here in the chase, not like a hound that
hunts, but one that fills up the cry. My money is
almost spent; I have been to-night exceedingly well
cudgelled; and I think the issue will be, I shall
have so much experience for my pains, and so, with
no money at all and a little more wit, return again to Venice.

38

IV,2,2946

I do not find that thou dealest justly with me.

39

IV,2,2948

Every day thou daffest me with some device, Iago;
and rather, as it seems to me now, keepest from me
all conveniency than suppliest me with the least
advantage of hope. I will indeed no longer endure
it, nor am I yet persuaded to put up in peace what
already I have foolishly suffered.

40

IV,2,2955

'Faith, I have heard too much, for your words and
performances are no kin together.

41

IV,2,2958

With nought but truth. I have wasted myself out of
my means. The jewels you have had from me to
deliver to Desdemona would half have corrupted a
votarist: you have told me she hath received them
and returned me expectations and comforts of sudden
respect and acquaintance, but I find none.

42

IV,2,2965

Very well! go to! I cannot go to, man; nor 'tis
not very well: nay, I think it is scurvy, and begin
to find myself fobbed in it.

43

IV,2,2969

I tell you 'tis not very well. I will make myself
known to Desdemona: if she will return me my
jewels, I will give over my suit and repent my
unlawful solicitation; if not, assure yourself I
will seek satisfaction of you.

44

IV,2,2975

Ay, and said nothing but what I protest intendment of doing.

45

IV,2,2981

It hath not appeared.

46

IV,2,2990

Well, what is it? is it within reason and compass?

47

IV,2,2993

Is that true? why, then Othello and Desdemona
return again to Venice.

48

IV,2,2999

How do you mean, removing of him?

49

IV,2,3002

And that you would have me to do?

50

IV,2,3015

I will hear further reason for this.

51

V,1,3141

Be near at hand; I may miscarry in't.

52

V,1,3144

I have no great devotion to the deed;
And yet he hath given me satisfying reasons:
'Tis but a man gone. Forth, my sword: he dies.

53

V,1,3160

I know his gait, 'tis he.—Villain, thou diest!

54

V,1,3166

O, I am slain!

55

V,1,3172

O, villain that I am!

56

V,1,3187

O wretched villain!

57

V,1,3191

Nobody come? then shall I bleed to death.

58

V,1,3211

O, help me here!

59

V,1,3215

O damn'd Iago! O inhuman dog!

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