Speeches (Lines) for Lucentio
in "Taming of the Shrew"

Total: 61

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,294

(stage directions). Enter LUCENTIO and his man TRANIO

Lucentio. Tranio, since for the great desire I had
To see fair Padua, nursery of arts,
I am arriv'd for fruitful Lombardy,
The pleasant garden of great Italy,
And by my father's love and leave am arm'd
With his good will and thy good company,
My trusty servant well approv'd in all,
Here let us breathe, and haply institute
A course of learning and ingenious studies.
Pisa, renowned for grave citizens,
Gave me my being and my father first,
A merchant of great traffic through the world,
Vincentio, come of the Bentivolii;
Vincentio's son, brought up in Florence,
It shall become to serve all hopes conceiv'd,
To deck his fortune with his virtuous deeds.
And therefore, Tranio, for the time I study,
Virtue and that part of philosophy
Will I apply that treats of happiness
By virtue specially to be achiev'd.
Tell me thy mind; for I have Pisa left
And am to Padua come as he that leaves
A shallow plash to plunge him in the deep,
And with satiety seeks to quench his thirst.


2

I,1,334

Tranio. Mi perdonato, gentle master mine;
I am in all affected as yourself;
Glad that you thus continue your resolve
To suck the sweets of sweet philosophy.
Only, good master, while we do admire
This virtue and this moral discipline,
Let's be no Stoics nor no stocks, I pray,
Or so devote to Aristotle's checks
As Ovid be an outcast quite abjur'd.
Balk logic with acquaintance that you have,
And practise rhetoric in your common talk;
Music and poesy use to quicken you;
The mathematics and the metaphysics,
Fall to them as you find your stomach serves you.
No profit grows where is no pleasure ta'en;
In brief, sir, study what you most affect.

Lucentio. Gramercies, Tranio, well dost thou advise.
If, Biondello, thou wert come ashore,
We could at once put us in readiness,
And take a lodging fit to entertain
Such friends as time in Padua shall beget.
Enter BAPTISTA with his two daughters, KATHERINA
and BIANCA; GREMIO, a pantaloon; HORTENSIO,
suitor to BIANCA. LUCENTIO and TRANIO stand by
But stay awhile; what company is this?


3

I,1,366

Tranio. Husht, master! Here's some good pastime toward;
That wench is stark mad or wonderful froward.

Lucentio. But in the other's silence do I see
Maid's mild behaviour and sobriety.
Peace, Tranio!


4

I,1,380

Bianca. Sister, content you in my discontent.
Sir, to your pleasure humbly I subscribe;
My books and instruments shall be my company,
On them to look, and practise by myself.

Lucentio. Hark, Tranio, thou mayst hear Minerva speak!


5

I,1,439

Tranio. I pray, sir, tell me, is it possible
That love should of a sudden take such hold?

Lucentio. O Tranio, till I found it to be true,
I never thought it possible or likely.
But see! while idly I stood looking on,
I found the effect of love in idleness;
And now in plainness do confess to thee,
That art to me as secret and as dear
As Anna to the Queen of Carthage was-
Tranio, I burn, I pine, I perish, Tranio,
If I achieve not this young modest girl.
Counsel me, Tranio, for I know thou canst;
Assist me, Tranio, for I know thou wilt.


6

I,1,454

Tranio. Master, it is no time to chide you now;
Affection is not rated from the heart;
If love have touch'd you, nought remains but so:
'Redime te captum quam queas minimo.'

Lucentio. Gramercies, lad. Go forward; this contents;
The rest will comfort, for thy counsel's sound.


7

I,1,458

Tranio. Master, you look'd so longly on the maid.
Perhaps you mark'd not what's the pith of all.

Lucentio. O, yes, I saw sweet beauty in her face,
Such as the daughter of Agenor had,
That made great Jove to humble him to her hand,
When with his knees he kiss'd the Cretan strand.


8

I,1,465

Tranio. Saw you no more? Mark'd you not how her sister
Began to scold and raise up such a storm
That mortal ears might hardly endure the din?

Lucentio. Tranio, I saw her coral lips to move,
And with her breath she did perfume the air;
Sacred and sweet was all I saw in her.


9

I,1,476

Tranio. Nay, then 'tis time to stir him from his trance.
I pray, awake, sir. If you love the maid,
Bend thoughts and wits to achieve her. Thus it stands:
Her elder sister is so curst and shrewd
That, till the father rid his hands of her,
Master, your love must live a maid at home;
And therefore has he closely mew'd her up,
Because she will not be annoy'd with suitors.

Lucentio. Ah, Tranio, what a cruel father's he!
But art thou not advis'd he took some care
To get her cunning schoolmasters to instruct her?


10

I,1,480

Tranio. Ay, marry, am I, sir, and now 'tis plotted.

Lucentio. I have it, Tranio.


11

I,1,483

Tranio. Master, for my hand,
Both our inventions meet and jump in one.

Lucentio. Tell me thine first.


12

I,1,487

Tranio. You will be schoolmaster,
And undertake the teaching of the maid-
That's your device.

Lucentio. It is. May it be done?


13

I,1,492

Tranio. Not possible; for who shall bear your part
And be in Padua here Vincentio's son;
Keep house and ply his book, welcome his friends,
Visit his countrymen, and banquet them?

Lucentio. Basta, content thee, for I have it full.
We have not yet been seen in any house,
Nor can we be distinguish'd by our faces
For man or master. Then it follows thus:
Thou shalt be master, Tranio, in my stead,
Keep house and port and servants, as I should;
I will some other be- some Florentine,
Some Neapolitan, or meaner man of Pisa.
'Tis hatch'd, and shall be so. Tranio, at once
Uncase thee; take my colour'd hat and cloak.
When Biondello comes, he waits on thee;
But I will charm him first to keep his tongue.


14

I,1,512

Tranio. So had you need. [They exchange habits]
In brief, sir, sith it your pleasure is,
And I am tied to be obedient-
For so your father charg'd me at our parting:
'Be serviceable to my son' quoth he,
Although I think 'twas in another sense-
I am content to be Lucentio,
Because so well I love Lucentio.

Lucentio. Tranio, be so because Lucentio loves;
And let me be a slave t' achieve that maid
Whose sudden sight hath thrall'd my wounded eye.
[Enter BIONDELLO.]
Here comes the rogue. Sirrah, where have you been?


15

I,1,520

Biondello. Where have I been! Nay, how now! where are you?
Master, has my fellow Tranio stol'n your clothes?
Or you stol'n his? or both? Pray, what's the news?

Lucentio. Sirrah, come hither; 'tis no time to jest,
And therefore frame your manners to the time.
Your fellow Tranio here, to save my life,
Puts my apparel and my count'nance on,
And I for my escape have put on his;
For in a quarrel since I came ashore
I kill'd a man, and fear I was descried.
Wait you on him, I charge you, as becomes,
While I make way from hence to save my life.
You understand me?


16

I,1,531

Biondello. I, sir? Ne'er a whit.

Lucentio. And not a jot of Tranio in your mouth:
Tranio is chang'd into Lucentio.


17

I,1,540

Tranio. So could I, faith, boy, to have the next wish after,
That Lucentio indeed had Baptista's youngest daughter.
But, sirrah, not for my sake but your master's, I advise
You use your manners discreetly in all kind of companies.
When I am alone, why, then I am Tranio;
But in all places else your master Lucentio.

Lucentio. Tranio, let's go.
One thing more rests, that thyself execute-
To make one among these wooers. If thou ask me why-
Sufficeth, my reasons are both good and weighty. Exeunt.


18

I,2,702

Gremio. O, very well; I have perus'd the note.
Hark you, sir; I'll have them very fairly bound-
All books of love, see that at any hand;
And see you read no other lectures to her.
You understand me- over and beside
Signior Baptista's liberality,
I'll mend it with a largess. Take your paper too,
And let me have them very well perfum'd;
For she is sweeter than perfume itself
To whom they go to. What will you read to her?

Lucentio. Whate'er I read to her, I'll plead for you
As for my patron, stand you so assur'd,
As firmly as yourself were still in place;
Yea, and perhaps with more successful words
Than you, unless you were a scholar, sir.


19

I,2,779

Tranio. I love no chiders, sir. Biondello, let's away.

Lucentio. [Aside] Well begun, Tranio.


20

I,2,802

Gremio. What, this gentleman will out-talk us all!

Lucentio. Sir, give him head; I know he'll prove a jade.


21

III,1,1268

(stage directions). Enter LUCENTIO as CAMBIO, HORTENSIO as LICIO, and BIANCA

Lucentio. Fiddler, forbear; you grow too forward, sir.
Have you so soon forgot the entertainment
Her sister Katherine welcome'd you withal?


22

III,1,1276

Hortensio. But, wrangling pedant, this is
The patroness of heavenly harmony.
Then give me leave to have prerogative;
And when in music we have spent an hour,
Your lecture shall have leisure for as much.

Lucentio. Preposterous ass, that never read so far
To know the cause why music was ordain'd!
Was it not to refresh the mind of man
After his studies or his usual pain?
Then give me leave to read philosophy,
And while I pause serve in your harmony.


23

III,1,1292

Hortensio. You'll leave his lecture when I am in tune?

Lucentio. That will be never- tune your instrument.


24

III,1,1294

Bianca. Where left we last?

Lucentio. Here, madam:
'Hic ibat Simois, hic est Sigeia tellus,
Hic steterat Priami regia celsa senis.'


25

III,1,1298

Bianca. Construe them.

Lucentio. 'Hic ibat' as I told you before- 'Simois' I am Lucentio-
'hic est' son unto Vincentio of Pisa- 'Sigeia tellus' disguised
thus to get your love- 'Hic steterat' and that Lucentio that
comes a-wooing- 'Priami' is my man Tranio- 'regia' bearing my
port- 'celsa senis' that we might beguile the old pantaloon.


26

III,1,1305

Bianca. Let's hear. O fie! the treble jars.

Lucentio. Spit in the hole, man, and tune again.


27

III,1,1311

Hortensio. Madam, 'tis now in tune.

Lucentio. All but the bass.


28

III,1,1317

Bianca. In time I may believe, yet I mistrust.

Lucentio. Mistrust it not- for sure, AEacides
Was Ajax, call'd so from his grandfather.


29

III,1,1327

Hortensio. [To LUCENTIO] You may go walk and give me leave
awhile;
My lessons make no music in three Parts.

Lucentio. Are you so formal, sir? Well, I must wait,
[Aside] And watch withal; for, but I be deceiv'd,
Our fine musician groweth amorous.


30

III,1,1355

(stage directions). Exeunt BIANCA and SERVANT

Lucentio. Faith, mistress, then I have no cause to stay.


31

III,2,1499

Tranio. But to her love concerneth us to add
Her father's liking; which to bring to pass,
As I before imparted to your worship,
I am to get a man- whate'er he be
It skills not much; we'll fit him to our turn-
And he shall be Vincentio of Pisa,
And make assurance here in Padua
Of greater sums than I have promised.
So shall you quietly enjoy your hope
And marry sweet Bianca with consent.

Lucentio. Were it not that my fellow schoolmaster
Doth watch Bianca's steps so narrowly,
'Twere good, methinks, to steal our marriage;
Which once perform'd, let all the world say no,
I'll keep mine own despite of all the world.


32

III,2,1610

Tranio. Of all mad matches, never was the like.

Lucentio. Mistress, what's your opinion of your sister?


33

IV,2,1831

(stage directions). Enter BIANCA, and LUCENTIO as CAMBIO

Lucentio. Now, mistress, profit you in what you read?


34

IV,2,1833

Bianca. What, master, read you, First resolve me that.

Lucentio. I read that I profess, 'The Art to Love.'


35

IV,2,1835

Bianca. And may you prove, sir, master of your art!

Lucentio. While you, sweet dear, prove mistress of my heart.


36

IV,2,1876

Tranio. Mistress, we have.

Lucentio. Then we are rid of Licio.


37

IV,2,1896

Biondello. Master, a mercatante or a pedant,
I know not what; but formal in apparel,
In gait and countenance surely like a father.

Lucentio. And what of him, Tranio?


38

IV,4,2235

Biondello. Cambio.

Lucentio. What say'st thou, Biondello?


39

IV,4,2237

Biondello. You saw my master wink and laugh upon you?

Lucentio. Biondello, what of that?


40

IV,4,2240

Biondello. Faith, nothing; but has left me here behind to expound
the meaning or moral of his signs and tokens.

Lucentio. I pray thee moralize them.


41

IV,4,2243

Biondello. Then thus: Baptista is safe, talking with the deceiving
father of a deceitful son.

Lucentio. And what of him?


42

IV,4,2245

Biondello. His daughter is to be brought by you to the supper.

Lucentio. And then?


43

IV,4,2248

Biondello. The old priest at Saint Luke's church is at your command
at all hours.

Lucentio. And what of all this?


44

IV,4,2255

Biondello. I cannot tell, except they are busied about a
counterfeit assurance. Take your assurance of her, cum privilegio
ad imprimendum solum; to th' church take the priest, clerk, and
some sufficient honest witnesses.
If this be not that you look for, I have more to say,
But bid Bianca farewell for ever and a day.

Lucentio. Hear'st thou, Biondello?


45

IV,4,2262

(stage directions). Exit

Lucentio. I may and will, if she be so contented.
She will be pleas'd; then wherefore should I doubt?
Hap what hap may, I'll roundly go about her;
It shall go hard if Cambio go without her. Exit


46

V,1,2351

Biondello. Softly and swiftly, sir, for the priest is ready.

Lucentio. I fly, Biondello; but they may chance to need the at
home, therefore leave us.


47

V,1,2447

(stage directions). Exeunt BIONDELLO, TRANIO, and PEDANT, as fast as may be

Lucentio. [Kneeling] Pardon, sweet father.


48

V,1,2452

Baptista Minola. How hast thou offended?
Where is Lucentio?

Lucentio. Here's Lucentio,
Right son to the right Vincentio,
That have by marriage made thy daughter mine,
While counterfeit supposes blear'd thine eyne.


49

V,1,2461

Bianca. Cambio is chang'd into Lucentio.

Lucentio. Love wrought these miracles. Bianca's love
Made me exchange my state with Tranio,
While he did bear my countenance in the town;
And happily I have arrived at the last
Unto the wished haven of my bliss.
What Tranio did, myself enforc'd him to;
Then pardon him, sweet father, for my sake.


50

V,1,2475

Baptista Minola. And I to sound the depth of this knavery. Exit

Lucentio. Look not pale, Bianca; thy father will not frown.


51

V,2,2489

(stage directions). Enter BAPTISTA, VINCENTIO, GREMIO, the PEDANT, LUCENTIO, BIANCA, PETRUCHIO, KATHERINA, HORTENSIO, and WIDOW. The SERVINGMEN with TRANIO, BIONDELLO, and GRUMIO, bringing in a banquet

Lucentio. At last, though long, our jarring notes agree;
And time it is when raging war is done
To smile at scapes and perils overblown.
My fair Bianca, bid my father welcome,
While I with self-same kindness welcome thine.
Brother Petruchio, sister Katherina,
And thou, Hortensio, with thy loving widow,
Feast with the best, and welcome to my house.
My banquet is to close our stomachs up
After our great good cheer. Pray you, sit down;
For now we sit to chat as well as eat. [They sit]


52

V,2,2550

Baptista Minola. O, O, Petruchio! Tranio hits you now.

Lucentio. I thank thee for that gird, good Tranio.


53

V,2,2563

Hortensio. Content. What's the wager?

Lucentio. Twenty crowns.


54

V,2,2567

Petruchio. Twenty crowns?
I'll venture so much of my hawk or hound,
But twenty times so much upon my wife.

Lucentio. A hundred then.


55

V,2,2571

Hortensio. Who shall begin?

Lucentio. That will I.
Go, Biondello, bid your mistress come to me.


56

V,2,2575

Baptista Minola. Son, I'll be your half Bianca comes.

Lucentio. I'll have no halves; I'll bear it all myself.
[Re-enter BIONDELLO]
How now! what news?


57

V,2,2612

(stage directions). [Exit KATHERINA]

Lucentio. Here is a wonder, if you talk of a wonder.


58

V,2,2634

Bianca. Fie! what a foolish duty call you this?

Lucentio. I would your duty were as foolish too;
The wisdom of your duty, fair Bianca,
Hath cost me a hundred crowns since supper-time!


59

V,2,2689

Petruchio. Why, there's a wench! Come on, and kiss me, Kate.

Lucentio. Well, go thy ways, old lad, for thou shalt ha't.


60

V,2,2691

Vincentio. 'Tis a good hearing when children are toward.

Lucentio. But a harsh hearing when women are froward.


61

V,2,2698

Hortensio. Now go thy ways; thou hast tam'd a curst shrow.

Lucentio. 'Tis a wonder, by your leave, she will be tam'd so.


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