Speeches (Lines) for Grumio
in "Taming of the Shrew"

Total: 63

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,557

Knock, sir! Whom should I knock?
Is there any man has rebus'd your worship?

2

I,2,560

Knock you here, sir? Why, sir, what am I, sir, that I
should knock you here, sir?

3

I,2,564

My master is grown quarrelsome. I should knock you first,
And then I know after who comes by the worst.

4

I,2,570

Help, masters, help! My master is mad.

5

I,2,580

Nay, 'tis no matter, sir, what he 'leges in Latin. If this
be not a lawful cause for me to leave his service- look you, sir:...

6

I,2,590

Knock at the gate? O heavens! Spake you not these words
plain: 'Sirrah knock me here, rap me here, knock me well, and...

7

I,2,626

Nay, look you, sir, he tells you flatly what his mind is.
Why, give him gold enough and marry him to a puppet or an...

8

I,2,655

I pray you, sir, let him go while the humour lasts. O' my
word, and she knew him as well as I do, she would think scolding...

9

I,2,675

Katherine the curst!
A title for a maid of all titles the worst.

10

I,2,685

Here's no knavery! See, to beguile the old folks, how the
young folks lay their heads together! Master, master, look about...

11

I,2,690

A proper stripling, and an amorous!

12

I,2,708

O this woodcock, what an ass it is!

13

I,2,726

And that his bags shall prove.

14

I,2,747

Will he woo her? Ay, or I'll hang her.

15

I,2,761

For he fears none.

16

I,2,768

I would I were as sure of a good dinner.
Enter TRANIO, bravely apparelled as LUCENTIO, and BIONDELLO

17

I,2,833

[with BIONDELLO:] O excellent motion! Fellows, let's be gone.

18

III,2,1572

Ay, sir, they be ready; the oats have eaten the horses.

19

IV,1,1621

Fie, fie on all tired jades, on all mad masters, and all
foul ways! Was ever man so beaten? Was ever man so ray'd? Was...

20

IV,1,1632

A piece of ice. If thou doubt it, thou mayst slide from my
shoulder to my heel with no greater a run but my head and my...

21

IV,1,1636

O, ay, Curtis, ay; and therefore fire, fire; cast on no
water.

22

IV,1,1639

She was, good Curtis, before this frost; but thou know'st
winter tames man, woman, and beast; for it hath tam'd my old...

23

IV,1,1643

Am I but three inches? Why, thy horn is a foot, and so long
am I at the least. But wilt thou make a fire, or shall I complain...

24

IV,1,1649

A cold world, Curtis, in every office but thine; and
therefore fire. Do thy duty, and have thy duty, for my master and...

25

IV,1,1653

Why, 'Jack boy! ho, boy!' and as much news as thou wilt.

26

IV,1,1655

Why, therefore, fire; for I have caught extreme cold.
Where's the cook? Is supper ready, the house trimm'd, rushes...

27

IV,1,1662

First know my horse is tired; my master and mistress fall'n
out.

28

IV,1,1665

Out of their saddles into the dirt; and thereby hangs a
tale.

29

IV,1,1668

Lend thine ear.

30

IV,1,1670

There. [Striking him]

31

IV,1,1672

And therefore 'tis call'd a sensible tale; and this cuff
was but to knock at your car and beseech list'ning. Now I begin:...

32

IV,1,1677

What's that to thee?

33

IV,1,1679

Tell thou the tale. But hadst thou not cross'd me, thou
shouldst have heard how her horse fell and she under her horse;...

34

IV,1,1690

Ay, and that thou and the proudest of you all shall find
when he comes home. But what talk I of this? Call forth...

35

IV,1,1698

Call them forth.

36

IV,1,1701

Why, she hath a face of her own.

37

IV,1,1703

Thou, it seems, that calls for company to countenance her.

38

IV,1,1705

Why, she comes to borrow nothing of them.

39

IV,1,1712

Welcome, you!- how now, you!- what, you!- fellow, you!- and
thus much for greeting. Now, my spruce companions, is all ready,...

40

IV,1,1716

E'en at hand, alighted by this; and therefore be not-
Cock's passion, silence! I hear my master.

41

IV,1,1727

Here, sir; as foolish as I was before.

42

IV,1,1731

Nathaniel's coat, sir, was not fully made,
And Gabriel's pumps were all unpink'd i' th' heel;...

43

IV,1,1792

Where is he?

44

IV,3,1957

No, no, forsooth; I dare not for my life.

45

IV,3,1973

What say you to a neat's foot?

46

IV,3,1975

I fear it is too choleric a meat.
How say you to a fat tripe finely broil'd?

47

IV,3,1978

I cannot tell; I fear 'tis choleric.
What say you to a piece of beef and mustard?

48

IV,3,1981

Ay, but the mustard is too hot a little.

49

IV,3,1983

Nay, then I will not; you shall have the mustard,
Or else you get no beef of Grumio.

50

IV,3,1986

Why then the mustard without the beef.

51

IV,3,2082

I gave him no order; I gave him the stuff.

52

IV,3,2084

Marry, sir, with needle and thread.

53

IV,3,2086

Thou hast fac'd many things.

54

IV,3,2088

Face not me. Thou hast brav'd many men; brave not me. I
will neither be fac'd nor brav'd. I say unto thee, I bid thy...

55

IV,3,2094

The note lies in's throat, if he say I said so.

56

IV,3,2096

Master, if ever I said loose-bodied gown, sew me in the
skirts of it and beat me to death with a bottom of brown bread; I...

57

IV,3,2101

I confess the cape.

58

IV,3,2103

I confess two sleeves.

59

IV,3,2106

Error i' th' bill, sir; error i' th' bill! I commanded the
sleeves should be cut out, and sew'd up again; and that I'll...

60

IV,3,2111

I am for thee straight; take thou the bill, give me thy
meteyard, and spare not me.

61

IV,3,2115

You are i' th' right, sir; 'tis for my mistress.

62

IV,3,2117

Villain, not for thy life! Take up my mistress' gown for
thy master's use!

63

IV,3,2120

O, sir, the conceit is deeper than you think for.
Take up my mistress' gown to his master's use!...

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