Speeches (Lines) for Cassio
in "Othello"

Total: 110

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,243

The duke does greet you, general,
And he requires your haste-post-haste appearance,...

2

I,2,247

Something from Cyprus as I may divine:
It is a business of some heat: the galleys...

3

I,2,261

Ancient, what makes he here?

4

I,2,264

I do not understand.

5

I,2,266

To who?

6

I,2,270

Here comes another troop to seek for you.

7

II,1,812

Thanks, you the valiant of this warlike isle,
That so approve the Moor! O, let the heavens...

8

II,1,817

His bark is stoutly timber'd, his pilot
Of very expert and approved allowance;...

9

II,1,823

What noise?

10

II,1,826

My hopes do shape him for the governor.

11

II,1,830

I pray you, sir, go forth,
And give us truth who 'tis that is arrived.

12

II,1,835

Most fortunately: he hath achieved a maid
That paragons description and wild fame;...

13

II,1,843

Has had most favourable and happy speed:
Tempests themselves, high seas, and howling winds,...

14

II,1,851

She that I spake of, our great captain's captain,
Left in the conduct of the bold Iago,...

15

II,1,869

He is not yet arrived: nor know I aught
But that he's well and will be shortly here.

16

II,1,872

The great contention of the sea and skies
Parted our fellowship—But, hark! a sail.

17

II,1,877

See for the news.
[Exit Gentleman]...

18

II,1,953

He speaks home, madam: You may relish him more in
the soldier than in the scholar.

19

II,1,968

'Tis truly so.

20

II,1,970

Lo, where he comes!

21

II,3,1133

Iago hath direction what to do;
But, notwithstanding, with my personal eye...

22

II,3,1146

Welcome, Iago; we must to the watch.

23

II,3,1152

She's a most exquisite lady.

24

II,3,1154

Indeed, she's a most fresh and delicate creature.

25

II,3,1157

An inviting eye; and yet methinks right modest.

26

II,3,1159

She is indeed perfection.

27

II,3,1164

Not to-night, good Iago: I have very poor and
unhappy brains for drinking: I could well wish...

28

II,3,1170

I have drunk but one cup to-night, and that was
craftily qualified too, and, behold, what innovation...

29

II,3,1176

Where are they?

30

II,3,1178

I'll do't; but it dislikes me.

31

II,3,1197

'Fore God, they have given me a rouse already.

32

II,3,1208

'Fore God, an excellent song.

33

II,3,1213

Is your Englishman so expert in his drinking?

34

II,3,1218

To the health of our general!

35

II,3,1230

Why, this is a more exquisite song than the other.

36

II,3,1232

No; for I hold him to be unworthy of his place that
does those things. Well, God's above all; and there...

37

II,3,1236

For mine own part,—no offence to the general, nor
any man of quality,—I hope to be saved.

38

II,3,1239

Ay, but, by your leave, not before me; the
lieutenant is to be saved before the ancient. Let's...

39

II,3,1248

Why, very well then; you must not think then that I am drunk.

40

II,3,1282

You rogue! you rascal!

41

II,3,1284

A knave teach me my duty!
I'll beat the knave into a twiggen bottle.

42

II,3,1287

Dost thou prate, rogue?

43

II,3,1292

Let me go, sir,
Or I'll knock you o'er the mazzard.

44

II,3,1296

Drunk!

45

II,3,1335

I pray you, pardon me; I cannot speak.

46

II,3,1414

Ay, past all surgery.

47

II,3,1416

Reputation, reputation, reputation! O, I have lost
my reputation! I have lost the immortal part of...

48

II,3,1431

I will rather sue to be despised than to deceive so
good a commander with so slight, so drunken, and so...

49

II,3,1440

I know not.

50

II,3,1442

I remember a mass of things, but nothing distinctly;
a quarrel, but nothing wherefore. O God, that men...

51

II,3,1449

It hath pleased the devil drunkenness to give place
to the devil wrath; one unperfectness shows me...

52

II,3,1456

I will ask him for my place again; he shall tell me
I am a drunkard! Had I as many mouths as Hydra,...

53

II,3,1465

I have well approved it, sir. I drunk!

54

II,3,1479

You advise me well.

55

II,3,1481

I think it freely; and betimes in the morning I will
beseech the virtuous Desdemona to undertake for me:...

56

III,1,1546

Masters, play here; I will content your pains;
Something that's brief; and bid 'Good morrow, general.'

57

III,1,1569

Dost thou hear, my honest friend?

58

III,1,1571

Prithee, keep up thy quillets. There's a poor piece
of gold for thee: if the gentlewoman that attends...

59

III,1,1578

Do, good my friend.
[Exit Clown]...

60

III,1,1583

Why, no; the day had broke
Before we parted. I have made bold, Iago,...

61

III,1,1592

I humbly thank you for't.
[Exit IAGO]...

62

III,1,1607

Yet, I beseech you,
If you think fit, or that it may be done,...

63

III,1,1614

I am much bound to you.

64

III,3,1633

Bounteous madam,
Whatever shall become of Michael Cassio,...

65

III,3,1640

Ay, but, lady,
That policy may either last so long,...

66

III,3,1657

Madam, I'll take my leave.

67

III,3,1659

Madam, not now: I am very ill at ease,
Unfit for mine own purposes.

68

III,4,2301

Madam, my former suit: I do beseech you
That by your virtuous means I may again...

69

III,4,2363

I humbly thank your ladyship.

70

III,4,2367

What make you from home?
How is it with you, my most fair Bianca?...

71

III,4,2375

Pardon me, Bianca:
I have this while with leaden thoughts been press'd:...

72

III,4,2385

Go to, woman!
Throw your vile guesses in the devil's teeth,...

73

III,4,2391

I know not, sweet: I found it in my chamber.
I like the work well: ere it be demanded—...

74

III,4,2396

I do attend here on the general;
And think it no addition, nor my wish,...

75

III,4,2400

Not that I love you not.

76

III,4,2404

'Tis but a little way that I can bring you;
For I attend here: but I'll see you soon.

77

IV,1,2469

What's the matter?

78

IV,1,2472

Rub him about the temples.

79

IV,1,2533

The worser that you give me the addition
Whose want even kills me.

80

IV,1,2539

Alas, poor caitiff!

81

IV,1,2542

Alas, poor rogue! I think, i' faith, she loves me.

82

IV,1,2549

Ha, ha, ha!

83

IV,1,2551

I marry her! what? a customer! Prithee, bear some
charity to my wit: do not think it so unwholesome....

84

IV,1,2556

Prithee, say true.

85

IV,1,2559

This is the monkey's own giving out: she is
persuaded I will marry her, out of her own love and...

86

IV,1,2563

She was here even now; she haunts me in every place.
I was the other day talking on the sea-bank with...

87

IV,1,2569

So hangs, and lolls, and weeps upon me; so hales,
and pulls me: ha, ha, ha!

88

IV,1,2574

Well, I must leave her company.

89

IV,1,2576

'Tis such another fitchew! marry a perfumed one.
[Enter BIANCA]...

90

IV,1,2587

How now, my sweet Bianca! how now! how now!

91

IV,1,2593

'Faith, I must; she'll rail in the street else.

92

IV,1,2595

'Faith, I intend so.

93

IV,1,2598

Prithee, come; will you?

94

V,1,3162

That thrust had been mine enemy indeed,
But that my coat is better than thou know'st...

95

V,1,3168

I am maim'd for ever. Help, ho! murder! murder!

96

V,1,3174

O, help, ho! light! a surgeon!

97

V,1,3183

What, ho! no watch? no passage? murder! murder!

98

V,1,3185

O, help!

99

V,1,3198

Here, here! for heaven's sake, help me!

100

V,1,3203

Iago? O, I am spoil'd, undone by villains!
Give me some help.

101

V,1,3206

I think that one of them is hereabout,
And cannot make away.

102

V,1,3212

That's one of them.

103

V,1,3225

My leg is cut in two.

104

V,1,3235

No.

105

V,1,3265

None in the world; nor do I know the man.

106

V,2,3661

Dear general, I never gave you cause.

107

V,2,3677

Most heathenish and most gross!

108

V,2,3686

I found it in my chamber:
And he himself confess'd but even now...

109

V,2,3691

There is besides in Roderigo's letter,
How he upbraids Iago, that he made him...

110

V,2,3730

This did I fear, but thought he had no weapon;
For he was great of heart.

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