Speeches (Lines) for Cassio
in "Othello"

Total: 110

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,243

Othello. The servants of the duke, and my lieutenant.
The goodness of the night upon you, friends!
What is the news?

Cassio. The duke does greet you, general,
And he requires your haste-post-haste appearance,
Even on the instant.


2

I,2,247

Othello. What is the matter, think you?

Cassio. Something from Cyprus as I may divine:
It is a business of some heat: the galleys
Have sent a dozen sequent messengers
This very night at one another's heels,
And many of the consuls, raised and met,
Are at the duke's already: you have been
hotly call'd for;
When, being not at your lodging to be found,
The senate hath sent about three several guests
To search you out.


3

I,2,261

(stage directions). [Exit]

Cassio. Ancient, what makes he here?


4

I,2,264

Iago. 'Faith, he to-night hath boarded a land carack:
If it prove lawful prize, he's made for ever.

Cassio. I do not understand.


5

I,2,266

Iago. He's married.

Cassio. To who?


6

I,2,270

Othello. Have with you.

Cassio. Here comes another troop to seek for you.


7

II,1,812

(stage directions). [Enter CASSIO]

Cassio. Thanks, you the valiant of this warlike isle,
That so approve the Moor! O, let the heavens
Give him defence against the elements,
For I have lost us him on a dangerous sea.


8

II,1,817

Montano. Is he well shipp'd?

Cassio. His bark is stoutly timber'd, his pilot
Of very expert and approved allowance;
Therefore my hopes, not surfeited to death,
Stand in bold cure.


9

II,1,823

(stage directions). [Enter a fourth Gentleman]

Cassio. What noise?


10

II,1,826

Fourth Gentleman. The town is empty; on the brow o' the sea
Stand ranks of people, and they cry 'A sail!'

Cassio. My hopes do shape him for the governor.


11

II,1,830

Second Gentleman. They do discharge their shot of courtesy:
Our friends at least.

Cassio. I pray you, sir, go forth,
And give us truth who 'tis that is arrived.


12

II,1,835

Montano. But, good lieutenant, is your general wived?

Cassio. Most fortunately: he hath achieved a maid
That paragons description and wild fame;
One that excels the quirks of blazoning pens,
And in the essential vesture of creation
Does tire the ingener.
[Re-enter second Gentleman]
How now! who has put in?


13

II,1,843

Second Gentleman. 'Tis one Iago, ancient to the general.

Cassio. Has had most favourable and happy speed:
Tempests themselves, high seas, and howling winds,
The gutter'd rocks and congregated sands—
Traitors ensteep'd to clog the guiltless keel,—
As having sense of beauty, do omit
Their mortal natures, letting go safely by
The divine Desdemona.


14

II,1,851

Montano. What is she?

Cassio. She that I spake of, our great captain's captain,
Left in the conduct of the bold Iago,
Whose footing here anticipates our thoughts
A se'nnight's speed. Great Jove, Othello guard,
And swell his sail with thine own powerful breath,
That he may bless this bay with his tall ship,
Make love's quick pants in Desdemona's arms,
Give renew'd fire to our extincted spirits
And bring all Cyprus comfort!
[Enter DESDEMONA, EMILIA, IAGO, RODERIGO, and Attendants]
O, behold,
The riches of the ship is come on shore!
Ye men of Cyprus, let her have your knees.
Hail to thee, lady! and the grace of heaven,
Before, behind thee, and on every hand,
Enwheel thee round!


15

II,1,869

Desdemona. I thank you, valiant Cassio.
What tidings can you tell me of my lord?

Cassio. He is not yet arrived: nor know I aught
But that he's well and will be shortly here.


16

II,1,872

Desdemona. O, but I fear—How lost you company?

Cassio. The great contention of the sea and skies
Parted our fellowship—But, hark! a sail.


17

II,1,877

Second Gentleman. They give their greeting to the citadel;
This likewise is a friend.

Cassio. See for the news.
[Exit Gentleman]
Good ancient, you are welcome.
[To EMILIA]
Welcome, mistress.
Let it not gall your patience, good Iago,
That I extend my manners; 'tis my breeding
That gives me this bold show of courtesy.


18

II,1,953

Desdemona. O most lame and impotent conclusion! Do not learn
of him, Emilia, though he be thy husband. How say
you, Cassio? is he not a most profane and liberal
counsellor?

Cassio. He speaks home, madam: You may relish him more in
the soldier than in the scholar.


19

II,1,968

Iago. [Aside] He takes her by the palm: ay, well said,
whisper: with as little a web as this will I
ensnare as great a fly as Cassio. Ay, smile upon
her, do; I will gyve thee in thine own courtship.
You say true; 'tis so, indeed: if such tricks as
these strip you out of your lieutenantry, it had
been better you had not kissed your three fingers so
oft, which now again you are most apt to play the
sir in. Very good; well kissed! an excellent
courtesy! 'tis so, indeed. Yet again your fingers
to your lips? would they were clyster-pipes for your sake!
[Trumpet within]
The Moor! I know his trumpet.

Cassio. 'Tis truly so.


20

II,1,970

Desdemona. Let's meet him and receive him.

Cassio. Lo, where he comes!


21

II,3,1133

Othello. Good Michael, look you to the guard to-night:
Let's teach ourselves that honourable stop,
Not to outsport discretion.

Cassio. Iago hath direction what to do;
But, notwithstanding, with my personal eye
Will I look to't.


22

II,3,1146

(stage directions). [Enter IAGO]

Cassio. Welcome, Iago; we must to the watch.


23

II,3,1152

Iago. Not this hour, lieutenant; 'tis not yet ten o' the
clock. Our general cast us thus early for the love
of his Desdemona; who let us not therefore blame:
he hath not yet made wanton the night with her; and
she is sport for Jove.

Cassio. She's a most exquisite lady.


24

II,3,1154

Iago. And, I'll warrant her, fun of game.

Cassio. Indeed, she's a most fresh and delicate creature.


25

II,3,1157

Iago. What an eye she has! methinks it sounds a parley of
provocation.

Cassio. An inviting eye; and yet methinks right modest.


26

II,3,1159

Iago. And when she speaks, is it not an alarum to love?

Cassio. She is indeed perfection.


27

II,3,1164

Iago. Well, happiness to their sheets! Come, lieutenant, I
have a stoup of wine; and here without are a brace
of Cyprus gallants that would fain have a measure to
the health of black Othello.

Cassio. Not to-night, good Iago: I have very poor and
unhappy brains for drinking: I could well wish
courtesy would invent some other custom of
entertainment.


28

II,3,1170

Iago. O, they are our friends; but one cup: I'll drink for
you.

Cassio. I have drunk but one cup to-night, and that was
craftily qualified too, and, behold, what innovation
it makes here: I am unfortunate in the infirmity,
and dare not task my weakness with any more.


29

II,3,1176

Iago. What, man! 'tis a night of revels: the gallants
desire it.

Cassio. Where are they?


30

II,3,1178

Iago. Here at the door; I pray you, call them in.

Cassio. I'll do't; but it dislikes me.


31

II,3,1197

(stage directions). [Re-enter CASSIO; with him MONTANO and Gentlemen; servants following with wine]

Cassio. 'Fore God, they have given me a rouse already.


32

II,3,1208

Iago. Some wine, ho!
[Sings]
And let me the canakin clink, clink;
And let me the canakin clink
A soldier's a man;
A life's but a span;
Why, then, let a soldier drink.
Some wine, boys!

Cassio. 'Fore God, an excellent song.


33

II,3,1213

Iago. I learned it in England, where, indeed, they are
most potent in potting: your Dane, your German, and
your swag-bellied Hollander—Drink, ho!—are nothing
to your English.

Cassio. Is your Englishman so expert in his drinking?


34

II,3,1218

Iago. Why, he drinks you, with facility, your Dane dead
drunk; he sweats not to overthrow your Almain; he
gives your Hollander a vomit, ere the next pottle
can be filled.

Cassio. To the health of our general!


35

II,3,1230

Iago. O sweet England!
King Stephen was a worthy peer,
His breeches cost him but a crown;
He held them sixpence all too dear,
With that he call'd the tailor lown.
He was a wight of high renown,
And thou art but of low degree:
'Tis pride that pulls the country down;
Then take thine auld cloak about thee.
Some wine, ho!

Cassio. Why, this is a more exquisite song than the other.


36

II,3,1232

Iago. Will you hear't again?

Cassio. No; for I hold him to be unworthy of his place that
does those things. Well, God's above all; and there
be souls must be saved, and there be souls must not be saved.


37

II,3,1236

Iago. It's true, good lieutenant.

Cassio. For mine own part,—no offence to the general, nor
any man of quality,—I hope to be saved.


38

II,3,1239

Iago. And so do I too, lieutenant.

Cassio. Ay, but, by your leave, not before me; the
lieutenant is to be saved before the ancient. Let's
have no more of this; let's to our affairs.—Forgive
us our sins!—Gentlemen, let's look to our business.
Do not think, gentlemen. I am drunk: this is my
ancient; this is my right hand, and this is my left:
I am not drunk now; I can stand well enough, and
speak well enough.


39

II,3,1248

All. Excellent well.

Cassio. Why, very well then; you must not think then that I am drunk.


40

II,3,1282

(stage directions). [Re-enter CASSIO, driving in RODERIGO]

Cassio. You rogue! you rascal!


41

II,3,1284

Montano. What's the matter, lieutenant?

Cassio. A knave teach me my duty!
I'll beat the knave into a twiggen bottle.


42

II,3,1287

Roderigo. Beat me!

Cassio. Dost thou prate, rogue?


43

II,3,1292

Montano. Nay, good lieutenant;
[Staying him]
I pray you, sir, hold your hand.

Cassio. Let me go, sir,
Or I'll knock you o'er the mazzard.


44

II,3,1296

Montano. Come, come,
you're drunk.

Cassio. Drunk!


45

II,3,1335

Othello. How comes it, Michael, you are thus forgot?

Cassio. I pray you, pardon me; I cannot speak.


46

II,3,1414

Iago. What, are you hurt, lieutenant?

Cassio. Ay, past all surgery.


47

II,3,1416

Iago. Marry, heaven forbid!

Cassio. Reputation, reputation, reputation! O, I have lost
my reputation! I have lost the immortal part of
myself, and what remains is bestial. My reputation,
Iago, my reputation!


48

II,3,1431

Iago. As I am an honest man, I thought you had received
some bodily wound; there is more sense in that than
in reputation. Reputation is an idle and most false
imposition: oft got without merit, and lost without
deserving: you have lost no reputation at all,
unless you repute yourself such a loser. What, man!
there are ways to recover the general again: you
are but now cast in his mood, a punishment more in
policy than in malice, even so as one would beat his
offenceless dog to affright an imperious lion: sue
to him again, and he's yours.

Cassio. I will rather sue to be despised than to deceive so
good a commander with so slight, so drunken, and so
indiscreet an officer. Drunk? and speak parrot?
and squabble? swagger? swear? and discourse
fustian with one's own shadow? O thou invisible
spirit of wine, if thou hast no name to be known by,
let us call thee devil!


49

II,3,1440

Iago. What was he that you followed with your sword? What
had he done to you?

Cassio. I know not.


50

II,3,1442

Iago. Is't possible?

Cassio. I remember a mass of things, but nothing distinctly;
a quarrel, but nothing wherefore. O God, that men
should put an enemy in their mouths to steal away
their brains! that we should, with joy, pleasance
revel and applause, transform ourselves into beasts!


51

II,3,1449

Iago. Why, but you are now well enough: how came you thus
recovered?

Cassio. It hath pleased the devil drunkenness to give place
to the devil wrath; one unperfectness shows me
another, to make me frankly despise myself.


52

II,3,1456

Iago. Come, you are too severe a moraler: as the time,
the place, and the condition of this country
stands, I could heartily wish this had not befallen;
but, since it is as it is, mend it for your own good.

Cassio. I will ask him for my place again; he shall tell me
I am a drunkard! Had I as many mouths as Hydra,
such an answer would stop them all. To be now a
sensible man, by and by a fool, and presently a
beast! O strange! Every inordinate cup is
unblessed and the ingredient is a devil.


53

II,3,1465

Iago. Come, come, good wine is a good familiar creature,
if it be well used: exclaim no more against it.
And, good lieutenant, I think you think I love you.

Cassio. I have well approved it, sir. I drunk!


54

II,3,1479

Iago. You or any man living may be drunk! at a time, man.
I'll tell you what you shall do. Our general's wife
is now the general: may say so in this respect, for
that he hath devoted and given up himself to the
contemplation, mark, and denotement of her parts and
graces: confess yourself freely to her; importune
her help to put you in your place again: she is of
so free, so kind, so apt, so blessed a disposition,
she holds it a vice in her goodness not to do more
than she is requested: this broken joint between
you and her husband entreat her to splinter; and, my
fortunes against any lay worth naming, this
crack of your love shall grow stronger than it was before.

Cassio. You advise me well.


55

II,3,1481

Iago. I protest, in the sincerity of love and honest kindness.

Cassio. I think it freely; and betimes in the morning I will
beseech the virtuous Desdemona to undertake for me:
I am desperate of my fortunes if they cheque me here.


56

III,1,1546

(stage directions). [Enter CASSIO and some Musicians]

Cassio. Masters, play here; I will content your pains;
Something that's brief; and bid 'Good morrow, general.'


57

III,1,1569

(stage directions). [Exeunt Musicians]

Cassio. Dost thou hear, my honest friend?


58

III,1,1571

Clown. No, I hear not your honest friend; I hear you.

Cassio. Prithee, keep up thy quillets. There's a poor piece
of gold for thee: if the gentlewoman that attends
the general's wife be stirring, tell her there's
one Cassio entreats her a little favour of speech:
wilt thou do this?


59

III,1,1578

Clown. She is stirring, sir: if she will stir hither, I
shall seem to notify unto her.

Cassio. Do, good my friend.
[Exit Clown]
[Enter IAGO]
In happy time, Iago.


60

III,1,1583

Iago. You have not been a-bed, then?

Cassio. Why, no; the day had broke
Before we parted. I have made bold, Iago,
To send in to your wife: my suit to her
Is, that she will to virtuous Desdemona
Procure me some access.


61

III,1,1592

Iago. I'll send her to you presently;
And I'll devise a mean to draw the Moor
Out of the way, that your converse and business
May be more free.

Cassio. I humbly thank you for't.
[Exit IAGO]
I never knew
A Florentine more kind and honest.


62

III,1,1607

Emilia. Good morrow, good Lieutenant: I am sorry
For your displeasure; but all will sure be well.
The general and his wife are talking of it;
And she speaks for you stoutly: the Moor replies,
That he you hurt is of great fame in Cyprus,
And great affinity, and that in wholesome wisdom
He might not but refuse you; but he protests he loves you
And needs no other suitor but his likings
To take the safest occasion by the front
To bring you in again.

Cassio. Yet, I beseech you,
If you think fit, or that it may be done,
Give me advantage of some brief discourse
With Desdemona alone.


63

III,1,1614

Emilia. Pray you, come in;
I will bestow you where you shall have time
To speak your bosom freely.

Cassio. I am much bound to you.


64

III,3,1633

Desdemona. O, that's an honest fellow. Do not doubt, Cassio,
But I will have my lord and you again
As friendly as you were.

Cassio. Bounteous madam,
Whatever shall become of Michael Cassio,
He's never any thing but your true servant.


65

III,3,1640

Desdemona. I know't; I thank you. You do love my lord:
You have known him long; and be you well assured
He shall in strangeness stand no further off
Than in a polite distance.

Cassio. Ay, but, lady,
That policy may either last so long,
Or feed upon such nice and waterish diet,
Or breed itself so out of circumstance,
That, I being absent and my place supplied,
My general will forget my love and service.


66

III,3,1657

Emilia. Madam, here comes my lord.

Cassio. Madam, I'll take my leave.


67

III,3,1659

Desdemona. Why, stay, and hear me speak.

Cassio. Madam, not now: I am very ill at ease,
Unfit for mine own purposes.


68

III,4,2301

Desdemona. How now, good Cassio! what's the news with you?

Cassio. Madam, my former suit: I do beseech you
That by your virtuous means I may again
Exist, and be a member of his love
Whom I with all the office of my heart
Entirely honour: I would not be delay'd.
If my offence be of such mortal kind
That nor my service past, nor present sorrows,
Nor purposed merit in futurity,
Can ransom me into his love again,
But to know so must be my benefit;
So shall I clothe me in a forced content,
And shut myself up in some other course,
To fortune's alms.


69

III,4,2363

Desdemona. I will go seek him. Cassio, walk hereabout:
If I do find him fit, I'll move your suit
And seek to effect it to my uttermost.

Cassio. I humbly thank your ladyship.


70

III,4,2367

Bianca. Save you, friend Cassio!

Cassio. What make you from home?
How is it with you, my most fair Bianca?
I' faith, sweet love, I was coming to your house.


71

III,4,2375

Bianca. And I was going to your lodging, Cassio.
What, keep a week away? seven days and nights?
Eight score eight hours? and lovers' absent hours,
More tedious than the dial eight score times?
O weary reckoning!

Cassio. Pardon me, Bianca:
I have this while with leaden thoughts been press'd:
But I shall, in a more continuate time,
Strike off this score of absence. Sweet Bianca,
[Giving her DESDEMONA's handkerchief]
Take me this work out.


72

III,4,2385

Bianca. O Cassio, whence came this?
This is some token from a newer friend:
To the felt absence now I feel a cause:
Is't come to this? Well, well.

Cassio. Go to, woman!
Throw your vile guesses in the devil's teeth,
From whence you have them. You are jealous now
That this is from some mistress, some remembrance:
No, in good troth, Bianca.


73

III,4,2391

Bianca. Why, whose is it?

Cassio. I know not, sweet: I found it in my chamber.
I like the work well: ere it be demanded—
As like enough it will—I'ld have it copied:
Take it, and do't; and leave me for this time.


74

III,4,2396

Bianca. Leave you! wherefore?

Cassio. I do attend here on the general;
And think it no addition, nor my wish,
To have him see me woman'd.


75

III,4,2400

Bianca. Why, I pray you?

Cassio. Not that I love you not.


76

III,4,2404

Bianca. But that you do not love me.
I pray you, bring me on the way a little,
And say if I shall see you soon at night.

Cassio. 'Tis but a little way that I can bring you;
For I attend here: but I'll see you soon.


77

IV,1,2469

Iago. Work on,
My medicine, work! Thus credulous fools are caught;
And many worthy and chaste dames even thus,
All guiltless, meet reproach. What, ho! my lord!
My lord, I say! Othello!
[Enter CASSIO]
How now, Cassio!

Cassio. What's the matter?


78

IV,1,2472

Iago. My lord is fall'n into an epilepsy:
This is his second fit; he had one yesterday.

Cassio. Rub him about the temples.


79

IV,1,2533

Iago. That's not amiss;
But yet keep time in all. Will you withdraw?
[OTHELLO retires]
Now will I question Cassio of Bianca,
A housewife that by selling her desires
Buys herself bread and clothes: it is a creature
That dotes on Cassio; as 'tis the strumpet's plague
To beguile many and be beguiled by one:
He, when he hears of her, cannot refrain
From the excess of laughter. Here he comes:
[Re-enter CASSIO]
As he shall smile, Othello shall go mad;
And his unbookish jealousy must construe
Poor Cassio's smiles, gestures and light behavior,
Quite in the wrong. How do you now, lieutenant?

Cassio. The worser that you give me the addition
Whose want even kills me.


80

IV,1,2539

Iago. Ply Desdemona well, and you are sure on't.
[Speaking lower]
Now, if this suit lay in Bianco's power,
How quickly should you speed!

Cassio. Alas, poor caitiff!


81

IV,1,2542

Iago. I never knew woman love man so.

Cassio. Alas, poor rogue! I think, i' faith, she loves me.


82

IV,1,2549

Iago. She gives it out that you shall marry hey:
Do you intend it?

Cassio. Ha, ha, ha!


83

IV,1,2551

Othello. Do you triumph, Roman? do you triumph?

Cassio. I marry her! what? a customer! Prithee, bear some
charity to my wit: do not think it so unwholesome.
Ha, ha, ha!


84

IV,1,2556

Iago. 'Faith, the cry goes that you shall marry her.

Cassio. Prithee, say true.


85

IV,1,2559

Othello. Have you scored me? Well.

Cassio. This is the monkey's own giving out: she is
persuaded I will marry her, out of her own love and
flattery, not out of my promise.


86

IV,1,2563

Othello. Iago beckons me; now he begins the story.

Cassio. She was here even now; she haunts me in every place.
I was the other day talking on the sea-bank with
certain Venetians; and thither comes the bauble,
and, by this hand, she falls me thus about my neck—


87

IV,1,2569

Othello. Crying 'O dear Cassio!' as it were: his gesture
imports it.

Cassio. So hangs, and lolls, and weeps upon me; so hales,
and pulls me: ha, ha, ha!


88

IV,1,2574

Othello. Now he tells how she plucked him to my chamber. O,
I see that nose of yours, but not that dog I shall
throw it to.

Cassio. Well, I must leave her company.


89

IV,1,2576

Iago. Before me! look, where she comes.

Cassio. 'Tis such another fitchew! marry a perfumed one.
[Enter BIANCA]
What do you mean by this haunting of me?


90

IV,1,2587

Bianca. Let the devil and his dam haunt you! What did you
mean by that same handkerchief you gave me even now?
I was a fine fool to take it. I must take out the
work?—A likely piece of work, that you should find
it in your chamber, and not know who left it there!
This is some minx's token, and I must take out the
work? There; give it your hobby-horse: wheresoever
you had it, I'll take out no work on't.

Cassio. How now, my sweet Bianca! how now! how now!


91

IV,1,2593

Iago. After her, after her.

Cassio. 'Faith, I must; she'll rail in the street else.


92

IV,1,2595

Iago. Will you sup there?

Cassio. 'Faith, I intend so.


93

IV,1,2598

Iago. Well, I may chance to see you; for I would very fain
speak with you.

Cassio. Prithee, come; will you?


94

V,1,3162

(stage directions). [Makes a pass at CASSIO]

Cassio. That thrust had been mine enemy indeed,
But that my coat is better than thou know'st
I will make proof of thine.


95

V,1,3168

(stage directions). [IAGO from behind wounds CASSIO in the leg, and exit]

Cassio. I am maim'd for ever. Help, ho! murder! murder!


96

V,1,3174

Othello. It is even so.

Cassio. O, help, ho! light! a surgeon!


97

V,1,3183

(stage directions). [Enter LODOVICO and GRATIANO]

Cassio. What, ho! no watch? no passage? murder! murder!


98

V,1,3185

Gratiano. 'Tis some mischance; the cry is very direful.

Cassio. O, help!


99

V,1,3198

Iago. Did not you hear a cry?

Cassio. Here, here! for heaven's sake, help me!


100

V,1,3203

Iago. What are you here that cry so grievously?

Cassio. Iago? O, I am spoil'd, undone by villains!
Give me some help.


101

V,1,3206

Iago. O me, lieutenant! what villains have done this?

Cassio. I think that one of them is hereabout,
And cannot make away.


102

V,1,3212

Roderigo. O, help me here!

Cassio. That's one of them.


103

V,1,3225

Iago. How is't, brother!

Cassio. My leg is cut in two.


104

V,1,3235

Iago. O notable strumpet! Cassio, may you suspect
Who they should be that have thus many led you?

Cassio. No.


105

V,1,3265

Gratiano. Some good man bear him carefully from hence;
I'll fetch the general's surgeon.
[To BIANCA]
For you, mistress,
Save you your labour. He that lies slain
here, Cassio,
Was my dear friend: what malice was between you?

Cassio. None in the world; nor do I know the man.


106

V,2,3661

Othello. Ay.

Cassio. Dear general, I never gave you cause.


107

V,2,3677

Othello. O villain!

Cassio. Most heathenish and most gross!


108

V,2,3686

Othello. O the pernicious caitiff!
How came you, Cassio, by that handkerchief
That was my wife's?

Cassio. I found it in my chamber:
And he himself confess'd but even now
That there he dropp'd it for a special purpose
Which wrought to his desire.


109

V,2,3691

Othello. O fool! fool! fool!

Cassio. There is besides in Roderigo's letter,
How he upbraids Iago, that he made him
Brave me upon the watch; whereon it came
That I was cast: and even but now he spake,
After long seeming dead, Iago hurt him,
Iago set him on.


110

V,2,3730

(stage directions). [Falls on the bed, and dies]

Cassio. This did I fear, but thought he had no weapon;
For he was great of heart.


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