Speeches (Lines) for Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury
in "Henry VI, Part I"

Total: 59

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# Act, Scene, Line
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Speech text

1

I,4,485

Earl of Salisbury. Talbot, my life, my joy, again return'd!
How wert thou handled being prisoner?
Or by what means got'st thou to be released?
Discourse, I prithee, on this turret's top.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. The Duke of Bedford had a prisoner
Call'd the brave Lord Ponton de Santrailles;
For him was I exchanged and ransomed.
But with a baser man of arms by far
Once in contempt they would have barter'd me:
Which I, disdaining, scorn'd; and craved death,
Rather than I would be so vile esteem'd.
In fine, redeem'd I was as I desired.
But, O! the treacherous Fastolfe wounds my heart,
Whom with my bare fists I would execute,
If I now had him brought into my power.


2

I,4,497

Earl of Salisbury. Yet tell'st thou not how thou wert entertain'd.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. With scoffs and scorns and contumelious taunts.
In open market-place produced they me,
To be a public spectacle to all:
Here, said they, is the terror of the French,
The scarecrow that affrights our children so.
Then broke I from the officers that led me,
And with my nails digg'd stones out of the ground,
To hurl at the beholders of my shame:
My grisly countenance made others fly;
None durst come near for fear of sudden death.
In iron walls they deem'd me not secure;
So great fear of my name 'mongst them was spread,
That they supposed I could rend bars of steel,
And spurn in pieces posts of adamant:
Wherefore a guard of chosen shot I had,
That walked about me every minute-while;
And if I did but stir out of my bed,
Ready they were to shoot me to the heart.


3

I,4,527

Sir William Glansdale. And I, here, at the bulwark of the bridge.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. For aught I see, this city must be famish'd,
Or with light skirmishes enfeebled.


4

I,4,532

Sir Thomas Gargrave. O Lord, have mercy on me, woful man!

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. What chance is this that suddenly hath cross'd us?
Speak, Salisbury; at least, if thou canst speak:
How farest thou, mirror of all martial men?
One of thy eyes and thy cheek's side struck off!
Accursed tower! accursed fatal hand
That hath contrived this woful tragedy!
In thirteen battles Salisbury o'ercame;
Henry the Fifth he first train'd to the wars;
Whilst any trump did sound, or drum struck up,
His sword did ne'er leave striking in the field.
Yet livest thou, Salisbury? though thy speech doth fail,
One eye thou hast, to look to heaven for grace:
The sun with one eye vieweth all the world.
Heaven, be thou gracious to none alive,
If Salisbury wants mercy at thy hands!
Bear hence his body; I will help to bury it.
Sir Thomas Gargrave, hast thou any life?
Speak unto Talbot; nay, look up to him.
Salisbury, cheer thy spirit with this comfort;
Thou shalt not die whiles—
He beckons with his hand and smiles on me.
As who should say 'When I am dead and gone,
Remember to avenge me on the French.'
Plantagenet, I will; and like thee, Nero,
Play on the lute, beholding the towns burn:
Wretched shall France be only in my name.
[Here an alarum, and it thunders and lightens]
What stir is this? what tumult's in the heavens?
Whence cometh this alarum and the noise?


5

I,4,567

(stage directions). [Here SALISBURY lifteth himself up and groans]

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Hear, hear how dying Salisbury doth groan!
It irks his heart he cannot be revenged.
Frenchmen, I'll be a Salisbury to you:
Pucelle or puzzel, dolphin or dogfish,
Your hearts I'll stamp out with my horse's heels,
And make a quagmire of your mingled brains.
Convey me Salisbury into his tent,
And then we'll try what these dastard Frenchmen dare.


6

I,5,580

(stage directions). [Here an alarum again: and TALBOT pursueth the]
DAUPHIN, and driveth him: then enter JOAN LA
PUCELLE, driving Englishmen before her, and exit
after them then re-enter TALBOT]

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Where is my strength, my valour, and my force?
Our English troops retire, I cannot stay them:
A woman clad in armour chaseth them.
[Re-enter JOAN LA PUCELLE]
Here, here she comes. I'll have a bout with thee;
Devil or devil's dam, I'll conjure thee:
Blood will I draw on thee, thou art a witch,
And straightway give thy soul to him thou servest.


7

I,5,590

(stage directions). [Here they fight]

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Heavens, can you suffer hell so to prevail?
My breast I'll burst with straining of my courage
And from my shoulders crack my arms asunder.
But I will chastise this high-minded strumpet.


8

I,5,603

(stage directions). [Exit]

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. My thoughts are whirled like a potter's wheel;
I know not where I am, nor what I do;
A witch, by fear, not force, like Hannibal,
Drives back our troops and conquers as she lists:
So bees with smoke and doves with noisome stench
Are from their hives and houses driven away.
They call'd us for our fierceness English dogs;
Now, like to whelps, we crying run away.
[A short alarum]
Hark, countrymen! either renew the fight,
Or tear the lions out of England's coat;
Renounce your soil, give sheep in lions' stead:
Sheep run not half so treacherous from the wolf,
Or horse or oxen from the leopard,
As you fly from your oft-subdued slaves.
[Alarum. Here another skirmish]
It will not be: retire into your trenches:
You all consented unto Salisbury's death,
For none would strike a stroke in his revenge.
Pucelle is enter'd into Orleans,
In spite of us or aught that we could do.
O, would I were to die with Salisbury!
The shame hereof will make me hide my head.


9

II,1,673

First Sentinel. Sergeant, you shall.
[Exit Sergeant]
Thus are poor servitors,
When others sleep upon their quiet beds,
Constrain'd to watch in darkness, rain and cold.
[Enter TALBOT, BEDFORD, BURGUNDY, and Forces, with]
scaling-ladders, their drums beating a dead march]

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Lord Regent, and redoubted Burgundy,
By whose approach the regions of Artois,
Wallon and Picardy are friends to us,
This happy night the Frenchmen are secure,
Having all day caroused and banqueted:
Embrace we then this opportunity
As fitting best to quittance their deceit
Contrived by art and baleful sorcery.


10

II,1,686

Duke of Burgundy. Traitors have never other company.
But what's that Pucelle whom they term so pure?

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. A maid, they say.


11

II,1,691

Duke of Burgundy. Pray God she prove not masculine ere long,
If underneath the standard of the French
She carry armour as she hath begun.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Well, let them practise and converse with spirits:
God is our fortress, in whose conquering name
Let us resolve to scale their flinty bulwarks.


12

II,1,695

Duke of Bedford. Ascend, brave Talbot; we will follow thee.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Not all together: better far, I guess,
That we do make our entrance several ways;
That, if it chance the one of us do fail,
The other yet may rise against their force.


13

II,1,701

Duke of Burgundy. And I to this.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. And here will Talbot mount, or make his grave.
Now, Salisbury, for thee, and for the right
Of English Henry, shall this night appear
How much in duty I am bound to both.


14

II,2,764

(stage directions). [Retreat sounded]

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Bring forth the body of old Salisbury,
And here advance it in the market-place,
The middle centre of this cursed town.
Now have I paid my vow unto his soul;
For every drop of blood was drawn from him,
There hath at least five Frenchmen died tonight.
And that hereafter ages may behold
What ruin happen'd in revenge of him,
Within their chiefest temple I'll erect
A tomb, wherein his corpse shall be interr'd:
Upon the which, that every one may read,
Shall be engraved the sack of Orleans,
The treacherous manner of his mournful death
And what a terror he had been to France.
But, lords, in all our bloody massacre,
I muse we met not with the Dauphin's grace,
His new-come champion, virtuous Joan of Arc,
Nor any of his false confederates.


15

II,2,798

Messenger. All hail, my lords! which of this princely train
Call ye the warlike Talbot, for his acts
So much applauded through the realm of France?

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Here is the Talbot: who would speak with him?


16

II,2,809

Duke of Burgundy. Is it even so? Nay, then, I see our wars
Will turn unto a peaceful comic sport,
When ladies crave to be encounter'd with.
You may not, my lord, despise her gentle suit.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Ne'er trust me then; for when a world of men
Could not prevail with all their oratory,
Yet hath a woman's kindness over-ruled:
And therefore tell her I return great thanks,
And in submission will attend on her.
Will not your honours bear me company?


17

II,2,818

Duke of Bedford. No, truly; it is more than manners will:
And I have heard it said, unbidden guests
Are often welcomest when they are gone.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Well then, alone, since there's no remedy,
I mean to prove this lady's courtesy.
Come hither, captain.
[Whispers]
You perceive my mind?


18

II,3,853

Countess of Auvergne. Is this the scourge of France?
Is this the Talbot, so much fear'd abroad
That with his name the mothers still their babes?
I see report is fabulous and false:
I thought I should have seen some Hercules,
A second Hector, for his grim aspect,
And large proportion of his strong-knit limbs.
Alas, this is a child, a silly dwarf!
It cannot be this weak and writhled shrimp
Should strike such terror to his enemies.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Madam, I have been bold to trouble you;
But since your ladyship is not at leisure,
I'll sort some other time to visit you.


19

II,3,859

Messenger. Stay, my Lord Talbot; for my lady craves
To know the cause of your abrupt departure.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Marry, for that she's in a wrong belief,
I go to certify her Talbot's here.


20

II,3,863

Countess of Auvergne. If thou be he, then art thou prisoner.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Prisoner! to whom?


21

II,3,873

Countess of Auvergne. To me, blood-thirsty lord;
And for that cause I trained thee to my house.
Long time thy shadow hath been thrall to me,
For in my gallery thy picture hangs:
But now the substance shall endure the like,
And I will chain these legs and arms of thine,
That hast by tyranny these many years
Wasted our country, slain our citizens
And sent our sons and husbands captivate.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Ha, ha, ha!


22

II,3,875

Countess of Auvergne. Laughest thou, wretch? thy mirth shall turn to moan.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. I laugh to see your ladyship so fond
To think that you have aught but Talbot's shadow
Whereon to practise your severity.


23

II,3,879

Countess of Auvergne. Why, art not thou the man?

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. I am indeed.


24

II,3,881

Countess of Auvergne. Then have I substance too.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. No, no, I am but shadow of myself:
You are deceived, my substance is not here;
For what you see is but the smallest part
And least proportion of humanity:
I tell you, madam, were the whole frame here,
It is of such a spacious lofty pitch,
Your roof were not sufficient to contain't.


25

II,3,891

Countess of Auvergne. This is a riddling merchant for the nonce;
He will be here, and yet he is not here:
How can these contrarieties agree?

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. That will I show you presently.
[Winds his horn. Drums strike up: a peal of]
ordnance. Enter soldiers]
How say you, madam? are you now persuaded
That Talbot is but shadow of himself?
These are his substance, sinews, arms and strength,
With which he yoketh your rebellious necks,
Razeth your cities and subverts your towns
And in a moment makes them desolate.


26

II,3,906

Countess of Auvergne. Victorious Talbot! pardon my abuse:
I find thou art no less than fame hath bruited
And more than may be gather'd by thy shape.
Let my presumption not provoke thy wrath;
For I am sorry that with reverence
I did not entertain thee as thou art.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Be not dismay'd, fair lady; nor misconstrue
The mind of Talbot, as you did mistake
The outward composition of his body.
What you have done hath not offended me;
Nor other satisfaction do I crave,
But only, with your patience, that we may
Taste of your wine and see what cates you have;
For soldiers' stomachs always serve them well.


27

III,2,1484

(stage directions). [An alarum. Enter TALBOT in an excursion]

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. France, thou shalt rue this treason with thy tears,
If Talbot but survive thy treachery.
Pucelle, that witch, that damned sorceress,
Hath wrought this hellish mischief unawares,
That hardly we escaped the pride of France.
[Exit]
[An alarum: excursions. BEDFORD, brought in sick]
in a chair. Enter TALBOT and BURGUNDY without:
within JOAN LA PUCELLE, CHARLES, BASTARD OF ORLEANS,
ALENCON, and REIGNIER, on the walls]


28

III,2,1505

Joan la Pucelle. What will you do, good grey-beard? break a lance,
And run a tilt at death within a chair?

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Foul fiend of France, and hag of all despite,
Encompass'd with thy lustful paramours!
Becomes it thee to taunt his valiant age
And twit with cowardice a man half dead?
Damsel, I'll have a bout with you again,
Or else let Talbot perish with this shame.


29

III,2,1515

Joan la Pucelle. Are ye so hot, sir? yet, Pucelle, hold thy peace;
If Talbot do but thunder, rain will follow.
[The English whisper together in council]
God speed the parliament! who shall be the speaker?

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Dare ye come forth and meet us in the field?


30

III,2,1518

Joan la Pucelle. Belike your lordship takes us then for fools,
To try if that our own be ours or no.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. I speak not to that railing Hecate,
But unto thee, Alencon, and the rest;
Will ye, like soldiers, come and fight it out?


31

III,2,1522

Duke of Alencon. Signior, no.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Signior, hang! base muleters of France!
Like peasant foot-boys do they keep the walls
And dare not take up arms like gentlemen.


32

III,2,1530

(stage directions). [Exeunt from the walls]

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. And there will we be too, ere it be long,
Or else reproach be Talbot's greatest fame!
Vow, Burgundy, by honour of thy house,
Prick'd on by public wrongs sustain'd in France,
Either to get the town again or die:
And I, as sure as English Henry lives
And as his father here was conqueror,
As sure as in this late-betrayed town
Great Coeur-de-lion's heart was buried,
So sure I swear to get the town or die.


33

III,2,1541

Duke of Burgundy. My vows are equal partners with thy vows.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. But, ere we go, regard this dying prince,
The valiant Duke of Bedford. Come, my lord,
We will bestow you in some better place,
Fitter for sickness and for crazy age.


34

III,2,1554

Duke of Bedford. Not to be gone from hence; for once I read
That stout Pendragon in his litter sick
Came to the field and vanquished his foes:
Methinks I should revive the soldiers' hearts,
Because I ever found them as myself.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Undaunted spirit in a dying breast!
Then be it so: heavens keep old Bedford safe!
And now no more ado, brave Burgundy,
But gather we our forces out of hand
And set upon our boasting enemy.
[Exeunt all but BEDFORD and Attendants]
[An alarum: excursions. Enter FASTOLFE and]
a Captain]


35

III,2,1580

(stage directions). [An alarum. Re-enter TALBOT, BURGUNDY, and the rest]

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Lost, and recover'd in a day again!
This is a double honour, Burgundy:
Yet heavens have glory for this victory!


36

III,2,1586

Duke of Burgundy. Warlike and martial Talbot, Burgundy
Enshrines thee in his heart and there erects
Thy noble deeds as valour's monuments.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Thanks, gentle duke. But where is Pucelle now?
I think her old familiar is asleep:
Now where's the Bastard's braves, and Charles his gleeks?
What, all amort? Rouen hangs her head for grief
That such a valiant company are fled.
Now will we take some order in the town,
Placing therein some expert officers,
And then depart to Paris to the king,
For there young Henry with his nobles lie.


37

III,2,1596

Duke of Burgundy. What wills Lord Talbot pleaseth Burgundy.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. But yet, before we go, let's not forget
The noble Duke of Bedford late deceased,
But see his exequies fulfill'd in Rouen:
A braver soldier never couched lance,
A gentler heart did never sway in court;
But kings and mightiest potentates must die,
For that's the end of human misery.


38

III,4,1707

(stage directions). [Enter KING HENRY VI, GLOUCESTER, BISHOP OF]
WINCHESTER, YORK, SUFFOLK, SOMERSET, WARWICK,
EXETER, VERNON. BASSET, and others. To them
with his Soldiers, TALBOT]

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. My gracious prince, and honourable peers,
Hearing of your arrival in this realm,
I have awhile given truce unto my wars,
To do my duty to my sovereign:
In sign, whereof, this arm, that hath reclaim'd
To your obedience fifty fortresses,
Twelve cities and seven walled towns of strength,
Beside five hundred prisoners of esteem,
Lets fall his sword before your highness' feet,
And with submissive loyalty of heart
Ascribes the glory of his conquest got
First to my God and next unto your grace.


39

IV,1,1772

Sir John Fastolfe. My gracious sovereign, as I rode from Calais,
To haste unto your coronation,
A letter was deliver'd to my hands,
Writ to your grace from the Duke of Burgundy.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Shame to the Duke of Burgundy and thee!
I vow'd, base knight, when I did meet thee next,
To tear the garter from thy craven's leg,
[Plucking it off]
Which I have done, because unworthily
Thou wast installed in that high degree.
Pardon me, princely Henry, and the rest
This dastard, at the battle of Patay,
When but in all I was six thousand strong
And that the French were almost ten to one,
Before we met or that a stroke was given,
Like to a trusty squire did run away:
In which assault we lost twelve hundred men;
Myself and divers gentlemen beside
Were there surprised and taken prisoners.
Then judge, great lords, if I have done amiss;
Or whether that such cowards ought to wear
This ornament of knighthood, yea or no.


40

IV,1,1793

Duke of Gloucester. To say the truth, this fact was infamous
And ill beseeming any common man,
Much more a knight, a captain and a leader.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. When first this order was ordain'd, my lords,
Knights of the garter were of noble birth,
Valiant and virtuous, full of haughty courage,
Such as were grown to credit by the wars;
Not fearing death, nor shrinking for distress,
But always resolute in most extremes.
He then that is not furnish'd in this sort
Doth but usurp the sacred name of knight,
Profaning this most honourable order,
And should, if I were worthy to be judge,
Be quite degraded, like a hedge-born swain
That doth presume to boast of gentle blood.


41

IV,1,1834

Henry VI. Why, then, Lord Talbot there shall talk with him
And give him chastisement for this abuse.
How say you, my lord? are you not content?

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Content, my liege! yes, but that I am prevented,
I should have begg'd I might have been employ'd.


42

IV,1,1839

Henry VI. Then gather strength and march unto him straight:
Let him perceive how ill we brook his treason
And what offence it is to flout his friends.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. I go, my lord, in heart desiring still
You may behold confusion of your foes.


43

IV,2,1966

(stage directions). [Enter TALBOT, with trump and drum]

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Go to the gates of Bourdeaux, trumpeter:
Summon their general unto the wall.
[Trumpet sounds. Enter General and others, aloft]
English John Talbot, captains, calls you forth,
Servant in arms to Harry King of England;
And thus he would: Open your city gates;
Be humble to us; call my sovereign yours,
And do him homage as obedient subjects;
And I'll withdraw me and my bloody power:
But, if you frown upon this proffer'd peace,
You tempt the fury of my three attendants,
Lean famine, quartering steel, and climbing fire;
Who in a moment even with the earth
Shall lay your stately and air-braving towers,
If you forsake the offer of their love.


44

IV,2,2010

(stage directions). [Exeunt General, &c]

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. He fables not; I hear the enemy:
Out, some light horsemen, and peruse their wings.
O, negligent and heedless discipline!
How are we park'd and bounded in a pale,
A little herd of England's timorous deer,
Mazed with a yelping kennel of French curs!
If we be English deer, be then in blood;
Not rascal-like, to fall down with a pinch,
But rather, moody-mad and desperate stags,
Turn on the bloody hounds with heads of steel
And make the cowards stand aloof at bay:
Sell every man his life as dear as mine,
And they shall find dear deer of us, my friends.
God and Saint George, Talbot and England's right,
Prosper our colours in this dangerous fight!


45

IV,5,2135

(stage directions). [Enter TALBOT and JOHN his son]

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. O young John Talbot! I did send for thee
To tutor thee in stratagems of war,
That Talbot's name might be in thee revived
When sapless age and weak unable limbs
Should bring thy father to his drooping chair.
But, O malignant and ill-boding stars!
Now thou art come unto a feast of death,
A terrible and unavoided danger:
Therefore, dear boy, mount on my swiftest horse;
And I'll direct thee how thou shalt escape
By sudden flight: come, dally not, be gone.


46

IV,5,2152

John Talbot. Is my name Talbot? and am I your son?
And shall I fly? O if you love my mother,
Dishonour not her honourable name,
To make a bastard and a slave of me!
The world will say, he is not Talbot's blood,
That basely fled when noble Talbot stood.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Fly, to revenge my death, if I be slain.


47

IV,5,2154

John Talbot. He that flies so will ne'er return again.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. If we both stay, we both are sure to die.


48

IV,5,2168

John Talbot. Then let me stay; and, father, do you fly:
Your loss is great, so your regard should be;
My worth unknown, no loss is known in me.
Upon my death the French can little boast;
In yours they will, in you all hopes are lost.
Flight cannot stain the honour you have won;
But mine it will, that no exploit have done:
You fled for vantage, everyone will swear;
But, if I bow, they'll say it was for fear.
There is no hope that ever I will stay,
If the first hour I shrink and run away.
Here on my knee I beg mortality,
Rather than life preserved with infamy.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Shall all thy mother's hopes lie in one tomb?


49

IV,5,2170

John Talbot. Ay, rather than I'll shame my mother's womb.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Upon my blessing, I command thee go.


50

IV,5,2172

John Talbot. To fight I will, but not to fly the foe.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Part of thy father may be saved in thee.


51

IV,5,2174

John Talbot. No part of him but will be shame in me.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Thou never hadst renown, nor canst not lose it.


52

IV,5,2176

John Talbot. Yes, your renowned name: shall flight abuse it?

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Thy father's charge shall clear thee from that stain.


53

IV,5,2179

John Talbot. You cannot witness for me, being slain.
If death be so apparent, then both fly.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. And leave my followers here to fight and die?
My age was never tainted with such shame.


54

IV,5,2186

John Talbot. And shall my youth be guilty of such blame?
No more can I be sever'd from your side,
Than can yourself yourself in twain divide:
Stay, go, do what you will, the like do I;
For live I will not, if my father die.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Then here I take my leave of thee, fair son,
Born to eclipse thy life this afternoon.
Come, side by side together live and die.
And soul with soul from France to heaven fly.


55

IV,6,2193

(stage directions). [Alarum: excursions, wherein JOHN TALBOT is]
hemmed about, and TALBOT rescues him]

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Saint George and victory! fight, soldiers, fight.
The regent hath with Talbot broke his word
And left us to the rage of France his sword.
Where is John Talbot? Pause, and take thy breath;
I gave thee life and rescued thee from death.


56

IV,6,2202

John Talbot. O, twice my father, twice am I thy son!
The life thou gavest me first was lost and done,
Till with thy warlike sword, despite of late,
To my determined time thou gavest new date.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. When from the Dauphin's crest thy sword struck fire,
It warm'd thy father's heart with proud desire
Of bold-faced victory. Then leaden age,
Quicken'd with youthful spleen and warlike rage,
Beat down Alencon, Orleans, Burgundy,
And from the pride of Gallia rescued thee.
The ireful bastard Orleans, that drew blood
From thee, my boy, and had the maidenhood
Of thy first fight, I soon encountered,
And interchanging blows I quickly shed
Some of his bastard blood; and in disgrace
Bespoke him thus; 'Contaminated, base
And misbegotten blood I spill of thine,
Mean and right poor, for that pure blood of mine
Which thou didst force from Talbot, my brave boy:'
Here, purposing the Bastard to destroy,
Came in strong rescue. Speak, thy father's care,
Art thou not weary, John? how dost thou fare?
Wilt thou yet leave the battle, boy, and fly,
Now thou art seal'd the son of chivalry?
Fly, to revenge my death when I am dead:
The help of one stands me in little stead.
O, too much folly is it, well I wot,
To hazard all our lives in one small boat!
If I to-day die not with Frenchmen's rage,
To-morrow I shall die with mickle age:
By me they nothing gain an if I stay;
'Tis but the shortening of my life one day:
In thee thy mother dies, our household's name,
My death's revenge, thy youth, and England's fame:
All these and more we hazard by thy stay;
All these are saved if thou wilt fly away.


57

IV,6,2246

John Talbot. The sword of Orleans hath not made me smart;
These words of yours draw life-blood from my heart:
On that advantage, bought with such a shame,
To save a paltry life and slay bright fame,
Before young Talbot from old Talbot fly,
The coward horse that bears me fail and die!
And like me to the peasant boys of France,
To be shame's scorn and subject of mischance!
Surely, by all the glory you have won,
An if I fly, I am not Talbot's son:
Then talk no more of flight, it is no boot;
If son to Talbot, die at Talbot's foot.

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Then follow thou thy desperate sire of Crete,
Thou Icarus; thy life to me is sweet:
If thou wilt fight, fight by thy father's side;
And, commendable proved, let's die in pride.


58

IV,7,2252

(stage directions). [Alarum: excursions. Enter TALBOT led by a Servant]

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Where is my other life? mine own is gone;
O, where's young Talbot? where is valiant John?
Triumphant death, smear'd with captivity,
Young Talbot's valour makes me smile at thee:
When he perceived me shrink and on my knee,
His bloody sword he brandish'd over me,
And, like a hungry lion, did commence
Rough deeds of rage and stern impatience;
But when my angry guardant stood alone,
Tendering my ruin and assail'd of none,
Dizzy-eyed fury and great rage of heart
Suddenly made him from my side to start
Into the clustering battle of the French;
And in that sea of blood my boy did drench
His over-mounting spirit, and there died,
My Icarus, my blossom, in his pride.


59

IV,7,2270

(stage directions). [Enter Soldiers, with the body of JOHN TALBOT]

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Thou antic death, which laugh'st us here to scorn,
Anon, from thy insulting tyranny,
Coupled in bonds of perpetuity,
Two Talbots, winged through the lither sky,
In thy despite shall 'scape mortality.
O, thou, whose wounds become hard-favour'd death,
Speak to thy father ere thou yield thy breath!
Brave death by speaking, whether he will or no;
Imagine him a Frenchman and thy foe.
Poor boy! he smiles, methinks, as who should say,
Had death been French, then death had died to-day.
Come, come and lay him in his father's arms:
My spirit can no longer bear these harms.
Soldiers, adieu! I have what I would have,
Now my old arms are young John Talbot's grave.
[Dies]
[Enter CHARLES, ALENCON, BURGUNDY, BASTARD OF]
ORLEANS, JOAN LA PUCELLE, and forces]


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