Speeches (Lines) for Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury
in "Henry VI, Part I"

Total: 59

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,4,485

The Duke of Bedford had a prisoner
Call'd the brave Lord Ponton de Santrailles;...

2

I,4,497

With scoffs and scorns and contumelious taunts.
In open market-place produced they me,...

3

I,4,527

For aught I see, this city must be famish'd,
Or with light skirmishes enfeebled.

4

I,4,532

What chance is this that suddenly hath cross'd us?
Speak, Salisbury; at least, if thou canst speak:...

5

I,4,567

Hear, hear how dying Salisbury doth groan!
It irks his heart he cannot be revenged....

6

I,5,580

Where is my strength, my valour, and my force?
Our English troops retire, I cannot stay them:...

7

I,5,590

Heavens, can you suffer hell so to prevail?
My breast I'll burst with straining of my courage...

8

I,5,603

My thoughts are whirled like a potter's wheel;
I know not where I am, nor what I do;...

9

II,1,673

Lord Regent, and redoubted Burgundy,
By whose approach the regions of Artois,...

10

II,1,686

A maid, they say.

11

II,1,691

Well, let them practise and converse with spirits:
God is our fortress, in whose conquering name...

12

II,1,695

Not all together: better far, I guess,
That we do make our entrance several ways;...

13

II,1,701

And here will Talbot mount, or make his grave.
Now, Salisbury, for thee, and for the right...

14

II,2,764

Bring forth the body of old Salisbury,
And here advance it in the market-place,...

15

II,2,798

Here is the Talbot: who would speak with him?

16

II,2,809

Ne'er trust me then; for when a world of men
Could not prevail with all their oratory,...

17

II,2,818

Well then, alone, since there's no remedy,
I mean to prove this lady's courtesy....

18

II,3,853

Madam, I have been bold to trouble you;
But since your ladyship is not at leisure,...

19

II,3,859

Marry, for that she's in a wrong belief,
I go to certify her Talbot's here.

20

II,3,863

Prisoner! to whom?

21

II,3,873

Ha, ha, ha!

22

II,3,875

I laugh to see your ladyship so fond
To think that you have aught but Talbot's shadow...

23

II,3,879

I am indeed.

24

II,3,881

No, no, I am but shadow of myself:
You are deceived, my substance is not here;...

25

II,3,891

That will I show you presently.
[Winds his horn. Drums strike up: a peal of]...

26

II,3,906

Be not dismay'd, fair lady; nor misconstrue
The mind of Talbot, as you did mistake...

27

III,2,1484

France, thou shalt rue this treason with thy tears,
If Talbot but survive thy treachery....

28

III,2,1505

Foul fiend of France, and hag of all despite,
Encompass'd with thy lustful paramours!...

29

III,2,1515

Dare ye come forth and meet us in the field?

30

III,2,1518

I speak not to that railing Hecate,
But unto thee, Alencon, and the rest;...

31

III,2,1522

Signior, hang! base muleters of France!
Like peasant foot-boys do they keep the walls...

32

III,2,1530

And there will we be too, ere it be long,
Or else reproach be Talbot's greatest fame!...

33

III,2,1541

But, ere we go, regard this dying prince,
The valiant Duke of Bedford. Come, my lord,...

34

III,2,1554

Undaunted spirit in a dying breast!
Then be it so: heavens keep old Bedford safe!...

35

III,2,1580

Lost, and recover'd in a day again!
This is a double honour, Burgundy:...

36

III,2,1586

Thanks, gentle duke. But where is Pucelle now?
I think her old familiar is asleep:...

37

III,2,1596

But yet, before we go, let's not forget
The noble Duke of Bedford late deceased,...

38

III,4,1707

My gracious prince, and honourable peers,
Hearing of your arrival in this realm,...

39

IV,1,1772

Shame to the Duke of Burgundy and thee!
I vow'd, base knight, when I did meet thee next,...

40

IV,1,1793

When first this order was ordain'd, my lords,
Knights of the garter were of noble birth,...

41

IV,1,1834

Content, my liege! yes, but that I am prevented,
I should have begg'd I might have been employ'd.

42

IV,1,1839

I go, my lord, in heart desiring still
You may behold confusion of your foes.

43

IV,2,1966

Go to the gates of Bourdeaux, trumpeter:
Summon their general unto the wall....

44

IV,2,2010

He fables not; I hear the enemy:
Out, some light horsemen, and peruse their wings....

45

IV,5,2135

O young John Talbot! I did send for thee
To tutor thee in stratagems of war,...

46

IV,5,2152

Fly, to revenge my death, if I be slain.

47

IV,5,2154

If we both stay, we both are sure to die.

48

IV,5,2168

Shall all thy mother's hopes lie in one tomb?

49

IV,5,2170

Upon my blessing, I command thee go.

50

IV,5,2172

Part of thy father may be saved in thee.

51

IV,5,2174

Thou never hadst renown, nor canst not lose it.

52

IV,5,2176

Thy father's charge shall clear thee from that stain.

53

IV,5,2179

And leave my followers here to fight and die?
My age was never tainted with such shame.

54

IV,5,2186

Then here I take my leave of thee, fair son,
Born to eclipse thy life this afternoon....

55

IV,6,2193

Saint George and victory! fight, soldiers, fight.
The regent hath with Talbot broke his word...

56

IV,6,2202

When from the Dauphin's crest thy sword struck fire,
It warm'd thy father's heart with proud desire...

57

IV,6,2246

Then follow thou thy desperate sire of Crete,
Thou Icarus; thy life to me is sweet:...

58

IV,7,2252

Where is my other life? mine own is gone;
O, where's young Talbot? where is valiant John?...

59

IV,7,2270

Thou antic death, which laugh'st us here to scorn,
Anon, from thy insulting tyranny,...

Return to the "Henry VI, Part I" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS