Speeches (Lines) for Pericles
in "Pericles"

Total: 121

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,48

I have, Antiochus, and, with a soul
Embolden'd with the glory of her praise,...

2

I,1,58

See where she comes, apparell'd like the spring,
Graces her subjects, and her thoughts the king...

3

I,1,72

That would be son to great Antiochus.

4

I,1,87

Antiochus, I thank thee, who hath taught
My frail mortality to know itself,...

5

I,1,108

Like a bold champion, I assume the lists,
Nor ask advice of any other thought...

6

I,1,140

Great king,
Few love to hear the sins they love to act;...

7

I,1,173

How courtesy would seem to cover sin,
When what is done is like an hypocrite,...

8

I,2,236

[To Lords without] Let none disturb us.—Why should
this change of thoughts,...

9

I,2,285

All leave us else; but let your cares o'erlook
What shipping and what lading's in our haven,...

10

I,2,292

If there be such a dart in princes' frowns,
How durst thy tongue move anger to our face?

11

I,2,296

Thou know'st I have power
To take thy life from thee.

12

I,2,301

Rise, prithee, rise.
Sit down: thou art no flatterer:...

13

I,2,311

Thou speak'st like a physician, Helicanus,
That minister'st a potion unto me...

14

I,2,342

Drew sleep out of mine eyes, blood from my cheeks,
Musings into my mind, with thousand doubts...

15

I,2,357

I do not doubt thy faith;
But should he wrong my liberties in my absence?

16

I,2,361

Tyre, I now look from thee then, and to Tarsus
Intend my travel, where I'll hear from thee;...

17

I,4,504

Lord governor, for so we hear you are,
Let not our ships and number of our men...

18

I,4,518

Arise, I pray you, rise:
We do not look for reverence, but to love,...

19

I,4,527

Which welcome we'll accept; feast here awhile,
Until our stars that frown lend us a smile.

20

II,1,580

Yet cease your ire, you angry stars of heaven!
Wind, rain, and thunder, remember, earthly man...

21

II,1,616

[Aside] A pretty moral.

22

II,1,626

[Aside] Simonides!

23

II,1,629

[Aside] How from the finny subject of the sea
These fishers tell the infirmities of men;...

24

II,1,637

May see the sea hath cast upon your coast.

25

II,1,640

A man whom both the waters and the wind,
In that vast tennis-court, have made the ball...

26

II,1,648

I never practised it.

27

II,1,651

What I have been I have forgot to know;
But what I am, want teaches me to think on:...

28

II,1,664

I thank you, sir.

29

II,1,666

I did but crave.

30

II,1,669

Why, are all your beggars whipped, then?

31

II,1,675

[Aside] How well this honest mirth becomes their labour!

32

II,1,677

Not well.

33

II,1,680

The good King Simonides, do you call him.

34

II,1,683

He is a happy king, since he gains from his subjects
the name of good by his government. How far is his...

35

II,1,690

Were my fortunes equal to my desires, I could wish
to make one there.

36

II,1,699

An armour, friends! I pray you, let me see it.
Thanks, fortune, yet, that, after all my crosses,...

37

II,1,716

To beg of you, kind friends, this coat of worth,
For it was sometime target to a king;...

38

II,1,725

I'll show the virtue I have borne in arms.

39

II,1,732

Believe 't, I will.
By your furtherance I am clothed in steel;...

40

II,1,743

Then honour be but a goal to my will,
This day I'll rise, or else add ill to ill.

41

II,3,832

'Tis more by fortune, lady, than by merit.

42

II,3,845

Some other is more fit.

43

II,3,849

You are right courteous knights.

44

II,3,851

By Jove, I wonder, that is king of thoughts,
These cates resist me, she but thought upon.

45

II,3,860

Yon king's to me like to my father's picture,
Which tells me in that glory once he was;...

46

II,3,902

I thank him.

47

II,3,904

I thank both him and you, and pledge him freely.

48

II,3,907

A gentleman of Tyre; my name, Pericles;
My education been in arts and arms;...

49

II,3,932

In those that practise them they are, my lord.

50

II,3,944

I am at your grace's pleasure.

51

II,5,1039

All fortune to the good Simonides!

52

II,5,1044

It is your grace's pleasure to commend;
Not my desert.

53

II,5,1047

The worst of all her scholars, my good lord.

54

II,5,1050

A most virtuous princess.

55

II,5,1052

As a fair day in summer, wondrous fair.

56

II,5,1056

I am unworthy for her schoolmaster.

57

II,5,1058

[Aside] What's here?
A letter, that she loves the knight of Tyre!...

58

II,5,1067

By the gods, I have not:
Never did thought of mine levy offence;...

59

II,5,1072

Traitor!

60

II,5,1074

Even in his throat—unless it be the king—
That calls me traitor, I return the lie.

61

II,5,1077

My actions are as noble as my thoughts,
That never relish'd of a base descent....

62

II,5,1086

Then, as you are as virtuous as fair,
Resolve your angry father, if my tongue...

63

II,5,1112

Even as my life, or blood that fosters it.

64

III,1,1191

Thou god of this great vast, rebuke these surges,
Which wash both heaven and hell; and thou, that hast...

65

III,1,1211

How, how, Lychorida!

66

III,1,1216

O you gods!
Why do you make us love your goodly gifts,...

67

III,1,1223

Now, mild may be thy life!
For a more blustrous birth had never babe:...

68

III,1,1236

Courage enough: I do not fear the flaw;
It hath done to me the worst. Yet, for the love...

69

III,1,1247

That's your superstition.

70

III,1,1251

As you think meet. Most wretched queen!

71

III,1,1253

A terrible childbed hast thou had, my dear;
No light, no fire: the unfriendly elements...

72

III,1,1270

I thank thee. Mariner, say what coast is this?

73

III,1,1272

Thither, gentle mariner.
Alter thy course for Tyre. When canst thou reach it?

74

III,1,1275

O, make for Tarsus!
There will I visit Cleon, for the babe...

75

III,3,1423

Most honour'd Cleon, I must needs be gone;
My twelve months are expired, and Tyrus stands...

76

III,3,1433

We cannot but obey
The powers above us. Could I rage and roar...

77

III,3,1451

I believe you;
Your honour and your goodness teach me to't,...

78

III,3,1462

Madam, my thanks and prayers.

79

III,3,1466

I will embrace
Your offer. Come, dearest madam. O, no tears,...

80

V,1,2276

Hum, ha!

81

V,1,2292

My fortunes—parentage—good parentage—
To equal mine!—was it not thus? what say you?

82

V,1,2296

I do think so. Pray you, turn your eyes upon me.
You are like something that—What country-woman?...

83

V,1,2302

I am great with woe, and shall deliver weeping.
My dearest wife was like this maid, and such a one...

84

V,1,2312

Where were you bred?
And how achieved you these endowments, which...

85

V,1,2317

Prithee, speak:
Falseness cannot come from thee; for thou look'st...

86

V,1,2329

Report thy parentage. I think thou said'st
Thou hadst been toss'd from wrong to injury,...

87

V,1,2336

Tell thy story;
If thine consider'd prove the thousandth part...

88

V,1,2345

O, I am mock'd,
And thou by some incensed god sent hither...

89

V,1,2350

Nay, I'll be patient.
Thou little know'st how thou dost startle me,...

90

V,1,2356

How! a king's daughter?
And call'd Marina?

91

V,1,2361

But are you flesh and blood?
Have you a working pulse? and are no fairy?...

92

V,1,2367

At sea! what mother?

93

V,1,2372

O, stop there a little!
[Aside]...

94

V,1,2380

I will believe you by the syllable
Of what you shall deliver. Yet, give me leave:...

95

V,1,2394

Ho, Helicanus!

96

V,1,2396

Thou art a grave and noble counsellor,
Most wise in general: tell me, if thou canst,...

97

V,1,2406

O Helicanus, strike me, honour'd sir;
Give me a gash, put me to present pain;...

98

V,1,2421

I am Pericles of Tyre: but tell me now
My drown'd queen's name, as in the rest you said...

99

V,1,2430

Now, blessing on thee! rise; thou art my child.
Give me fresh garments. Mine own, Helicanus;...

100

V,1,2439

I embrace you.
Give me my robes. I am wild in my beholding....

101

V,1,2446

None!
The music of the spheres! List, my Marina.

102

V,1,2449

Rarest sounds! Do ye not hear?

103

V,1,2452

Most heavenly music!
It nips me unto listening, and thick slumber...

104

V,1,2473

Celestial Dian, goddess argentine,
I will obey thee. Helicanus!

105

V,1,2477

My purpose was for Tarsus, there to strike
The inhospitable Cleon; but I am...

106

V,1,2488

You shall prevail,
Were it to woo my daughter; for it seems...

107

V,1,2492

Come, my Marina.

108

V,3,2521

Hail, Dian! to perform thy just command,
I here confess myself the king of Tyre;...

109

V,3,2537

What means the nun? she dies! help, gentlemen!

110

V,3,2541

Reverend appearer, no;
I threw her overboard with these very arms.

111

V,3,2544

'Tis most certain.

112

V,3,2550

May we see them?

113

V,3,2560

The voice of dead Thaisa!

114

V,3,2563

Immortal Dian!

115

V,3,2568

This, this: no more, you gods! your present kindness
Makes my past miseries sports: you shall do well,...

116

V,3,2576

Look, who kneels here! Flesh of thy flesh, Thaisa;
Thy burden at the sea, and call'd Marina...

117

V,3,2582

You have heard me say, when I did fly from Tyre,
I left behind an ancient substitute:...

118

V,3,2587

Still confirmation:
Embrace him, dear Thaisa; this is he....

119

V,3,2595

Reverend sir,
The gods can have no mortal officer...

120

V,3,2604

Pure Dian, bless thee for thy vision! I
Will offer night-oblations to thee. Thaisa,...

121

V,3,2614

Heavens make a star of him! Yet there, my queen,
We'll celebrate their nuptials, and ourselves...

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