Speeches (Lines) for Pericles
in "Pericles"

Total: 121

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# Act, Scene, Line
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Speech text

1

I,1,48

Antiochus. Young prince of Tyre, you have at large received
The danger of the task you undertake.

Pericles. I have, Antiochus, and, with a soul
Embolden'd with the glory of her praise,
Think death no hazard in this enterprise.


2

I,1,58

(stage directions). [Music. Enter the Daughter of ANTIOCHUS]

Pericles. See where she comes, apparell'd like the spring,
Graces her subjects, and her thoughts the king
Of every virtue gives renown to men!
Her face the book of praises, where is read
Nothing but curious pleasures, as from thence
Sorrow were ever razed and testy wrath
Could never be her mild companion.
You gods that made me man, and sway in love,
That have inflamed desire in my breast
To taste the fruit of yon celestial tree,
Or die in the adventure, be my helps,
As I am son and servant to your will,
To compass such a boundless happiness!


3

I,1,72

Antiochus. Prince Pericles,—

Pericles. That would be son to great Antiochus.


4

I,1,87

Antiochus. Before thee stands this fair Hesperides,
With golden fruit, but dangerous to be touch'd;
For death-like dragons here affright thee hard:
Her face, like heaven, enticeth thee to view
Her countless glory, which desert must gain;
And which, without desert, because thine eye
Presumes to reach, all thy whole heap must die.
Yon sometimes famous princes, like thyself,
Drawn by report, adventurous by desire,
Tell thee, with speechless tongues and semblance pale,
That without covering, save yon field of stars,
Here they stand martyrs, slain in Cupid's wars;
And with dead cheeks advise thee to desist
For going on death's net, whom none resist.

Pericles. Antiochus, I thank thee, who hath taught
My frail mortality to know itself,
And by those fearful objects to prepare
This body, like to them, to what I must;
For death remember'd should be like a mirror,
Who tells us life's but breath, to trust it error.
I'll make my will then, and, as sick men do
Who know the world, see heaven, but, feeling woe,
Gripe not at earthly joys as erst they did;
So I bequeath a happy peace to you
And all good men, as every prince should do;
My riches to the earth from whence they came;
But my unspotted fire of love to you.
[To the Daughter of ANTIOCHUS]
Thus ready for the way of life or death,
I wait the sharpest blow, Antiochus.


5

I,1,108

Daughter of Antiochus. Of all say'd yet, mayst thou prove prosperous!
Of all say'd yet, I wish thee happiness!

Pericles. Like a bold champion, I assume the lists,
Nor ask advice of any other thought
But faithfulness and courage.
[He reads the riddle]
I am no viper, yet I feed
On mother's flesh which did me breed.
I sought a husband, in which labour
I found that kindness in a father:
He's father, son, and husband mild;
I mother, wife, and yet his child.
How they may be, and yet in two,
As you will live, resolve it you.
Sharp physic is the last: but, O you powers
That give heaven countless eyes to view men's acts,
Why cloud they not their sights perpetually,
If this be true, which makes me pale to read it?
Fair glass of light, I loved you, and could still,
[Takes hold of the hand of the Daughter of ANTIOCHUS]
Were not this glorious casket stored with ill:
But I must tell you, now my thoughts revolt
For he's no man on whom perfections wait
That, knowing sin within, will touch the gate.
You are a fair viol, and your sense the strings;
Who, finger'd to make man his lawful music,
Would draw heaven down, and all the gods, to hearken:
But being play'd upon before your time,
Hell only danceth at so harsh a chime.
Good sooth, I care not for you.


6

I,1,140

Antiochus. Prince Pericles, touch not, upon thy life.
For that's an article within our law,
As dangerous as the rest. Your time's expired:
Either expound now, or receive your sentence.

Pericles. Great king,
Few love to hear the sins they love to act;
'Twould braid yourself too near for me to tell it.
Who has a book of all that monarchs do,
He's more secure to keep it shut than shown:
For vice repeated is like the wandering wind.
Blows dust in other's eyes, to spread itself;
And yet the end of all is bought thus dear,
The breath is gone, and the sore eyes see clear:
To stop the air would hurt them. The blind mole casts
Copp'd hills towards heaven, to tell the earth is throng'd
By man's oppression; and the poor worm doth die for't.
Kings are earth's gods; in vice their law's
their will;
And if Jove stray, who dares say Jove doth ill?
It is enough you know; and it is fit,
What being more known grows worse, to smother it.
All love the womb that their first being bred,
Then give my tongue like leave to love my head.


7

I,1,173

(stage directions). [Exeunt all but PERICLES]

Pericles. How courtesy would seem to cover sin,
When what is done is like an hypocrite,
The which is good in nothing but in sight!
If it be true that I interpret false,
Then were it certain you were not so bad
As with foul incest to abuse your soul;
Where now you're both a father and a son,
By your untimely claspings with your child,
Which pleasure fits an husband, not a father;
And she an eater of her mother's flesh,
By the defiling of her parent's bed;
And both like serpents are, who though they feed
On sweetest flowers, yet they poison breed.
Antioch, farewell! for wisdom sees, those men
Blush not in actions blacker than the night,
Will shun no course to keep them from the light.
One sin, I know, another doth provoke;
Murder's as near to lust as flame to smoke:
Poison and treason are the hands of sin,
Ay, and the targets, to put off the shame:
Then, lest my lie be cropp'd to keep you clear,
By flight I'll shun the danger which I fear.


8

I,2,236

(stage directions). [Enter PERICLES]

Pericles. [To Lords without] Let none disturb us.—Why should
this change of thoughts,
The sad companion, dull-eyed melancholy,
Be my so used a guest as not an hour,
In the day's glorious walk, or peaceful night,
The tomb where grief should sleep, can breed me quiet?
Here pleasures court mine eyes, and mine eyes shun them,
And danger, which I fear'd, is at Antioch,
Whose aim seems far too short to hit me here:
Yet neither pleasure's art can joy my spirits,
Nor yet the other's distance comfort me.
Then it is thus: the passions of the mind,
That have their first conception by mis-dread,
Have after-nourishment and life by care;
And what was first but fear what might be done,
Grows elder now and cares it be not done.
And so with me: the great Antiochus,
'Gainst whom I am too little to contend,
Since he's so great can make his will his act,
Will think me speaking, though I swear to silence;
Nor boots it me to say I honour him.
If he suspect I may dishonour him:
And what may make him blush in being known,
He'll stop the course by which it might be known;
With hostile forces he'll o'erspread the land,
And with the ostent of war will look so huge,
Amazement shall drive courage from the state;
Our men be vanquish'd ere they do resist,
And subjects punish'd that ne'er thought offence:
Which care of them, not pity of myself,
Who am no more but as the tops of trees,
Which fence the roots they grow by and defend them,
Makes both my body pine and soul to languish,
And punish that before that he would punish.


9

I,2,285

Helicanus. Peace, peace, and give experience tongue.
They do abuse the king that flatter him:
For flattery is the bellows blows up sin;
The thing which is flatter'd, but a spark,
To which that blast gives heat and stronger glowing;
Whereas reproof, obedient and in order,
Fits kings, as they are men, for they may err.
When Signior Sooth here does proclaim a peace,
He flatters you, makes war upon your life.
Prince, pardon me, or strike me, if you please;
I cannot be much lower than my knees.

Pericles. All leave us else; but let your cares o'erlook
What shipping and what lading's in our haven,
And then return to us.
[Exeunt Lords]
Helicanus, thou
Hast moved us: what seest thou in our looks?


10

I,2,292

Helicanus. An angry brow, dread lord.

Pericles. If there be such a dart in princes' frowns,
How durst thy tongue move anger to our face?


11

I,2,296

Helicanus. How dare the plants look up to heaven, from whence
They have their nourishment?

Pericles. Thou know'st I have power
To take thy life from thee.


12

I,2,301

Helicanus. [Kneeling]
I have ground the axe myself;
Do you but strike the blow.

Pericles. Rise, prithee, rise.
Sit down: thou art no flatterer:
I thank thee for it; and heaven forbid
That kings should let their ears hear their
faults hid!
Fit counsellor and servant for a prince,
Who by thy wisdom makest a prince thy servant,
What wouldst thou have me do?


13

I,2,311

Helicanus. To bear with patience
Such griefs as you yourself do lay upon yourself.

Pericles. Thou speak'st like a physician, Helicanus,
That minister'st a potion unto me
That thou wouldst tremble to receive thyself.
Attend me, then: I went to Antioch,
Where as thou know'st, against the face of death,
I sought the purchase of a glorious beauty.
From whence an issue I might propagate,
Are arms to princes, and bring joys to subjects.
Her face was to mine eye beyond all wonder;
The rest—hark in thine ear—as black as incest:
Which by my knowledge found, the sinful father
Seem'd not to strike, but smooth: but thou
know'st this,
'Tis time to fear when tyrants seem to kiss.
Such fear so grew in me, I hither fled,
Under the covering of a careful night,
Who seem'd my good protector; and, being here,
Bethought me what was past, what might succeed.
I knew him tyrannous; and tyrants' fears
Decrease not, but grow faster than the years:
And should he doubt it, as no doubt he doth,
That I should open to the listening air
How many worthy princes' bloods were shed,
To keep his bed of blackness unlaid ope,
To lop that doubt, he'll fill this land with arms,
And make pretence of wrong that I have done him:
When all, for mine, if I may call offence,
Must feel war's blow, who spares not innocence:
Which love to all, of which thyself art one,
Who now reprovest me for it,—


14

I,2,342

Helicanus. Alas, sir!

Pericles. Drew sleep out of mine eyes, blood from my cheeks,
Musings into my mind, with thousand doubts
How I might stop this tempest ere it came;
And finding little comfort to relieve them,
I thought it princely charity to grieve them.


15

I,2,357

Helicanus. Well, my lord, since you have given me leave to speak.
Freely will I speak. Antiochus you fear,
And justly too, I think, you fear the tyrant,
Who either by public war or private treason
Will take away your life.
Therefore, my lord, go travel for a while,
Till that his rage and anger be forgot,
Or till the Destinies do cut his thread of life.
Your rule direct to any; if to me.
Day serves not light more faithful than I'll be.

Pericles. I do not doubt thy faith;
But should he wrong my liberties in my absence?


16

I,2,361

Helicanus. We'll mingle our bloods together in the earth,
From whence we had our being and our birth.

Pericles. Tyre, I now look from thee then, and to Tarsus
Intend my travel, where I'll hear from thee;
And by whose letters I'll dispose myself.
The care I had and have of subjects' good
On thee I lay whose wisdom's strength can bear it.
I'll take thy word for faith, not ask thine oath:
Who shuns not to break one will sure crack both:
But in our orbs we'll live so round and safe,
That time of both this truth shall ne'er convince,
Thou show'dst a subject's shine, I a true prince.


17

I,4,504

(stage directions). [Enter PERICLES with Attendants]

Pericles. Lord governor, for so we hear you are,
Let not our ships and number of our men
Be like a beacon fired to amaze your eyes.
We have heard your miseries as far as Tyre,
And seen the desolation of your streets:
Nor come we to add sorrow to your tears,
But to relieve them of their heavy load;
And these our ships, you happily may think
Are like the Trojan horse was stuff'd within
With bloody veins, expecting overthrow,
Are stored with corn to make your needy bread,
And give them life whom hunger starved half dead.


18

I,4,518

All. The gods of Greece protect you!
And we'll pray for you.

Pericles. Arise, I pray you, rise:
We do not look for reverence, but to love,
And harbourage for ourself, our ships, and men.


19

I,4,527

Cleon. The which when any shall not gratify,
Or pay you with unthankfulness in thought,
Be it our wives, our children, or ourselves,
The curse of heaven and men succeed their evils!
Till when,—the which I hope shall ne'er be seen,—
Your grace is welcome to our town and us.

Pericles. Which welcome we'll accept; feast here awhile,
Until our stars that frown lend us a smile.


20

II,1,580

(stage directions). [Enter PERICLES, wet]

Pericles. Yet cease your ire, you angry stars of heaven!
Wind, rain, and thunder, remember, earthly man
Is but a substance that must yield to you;
And I, as fits my nature, do obey you:
Alas, the sea hath cast me on the rocks,
Wash'd me from shore to shore, and left me breath
Nothing to think on but ensuing death:
Let it suffice the greatness of your powers
To have bereft a prince of all his fortunes;
And having thrown him from your watery grave,
Here to have death in peace is all he'll crave.


21

II,1,616

First Fisherman. Why, as men do a-land; the great ones eat up the
little ones: I can compare our rich misers to
nothing so fitly as to a whale; a' plays and
tumbles, driving the poor fry before him, and at
last devours them all at a mouthful: such whales
have I heard on o' the land, who never leave gaping
till they've swallowed the whole parish, church,
steeple, bells, and all.

Pericles. [Aside] A pretty moral.


22

II,1,626

Third Fisherman. Because he should have swallowed me too: and when I
had been in his belly, I would have kept such a
jangling of the bells, that he should never have
left, till he cast bells, steeple, church, and
parish up again. But if the good King Simonides
were of my mind,—

Pericles. [Aside] Simonides!


23

II,1,629

Third Fisherman. We would purge the land of these drones, that rob
the bee of her honey.

Pericles. [Aside] How from the finny subject of the sea
These fishers tell the infirmities of men;
And from their watery empire recollect
All that may men approve or men detect!
Peace be at your labour, honest fishermen.


24

II,1,637

Second Fisherman. Honest! good fellow, what's that? If it be a day
fits you, search out of the calendar, and nobody
look after it.

Pericles. May see the sea hath cast upon your coast.


25

II,1,640

Second Fisherman. What a drunken knave was the sea to cast thee in our
way!

Pericles. A man whom both the waters and the wind,
In that vast tennis-court, have made the ball
For them to play upon, entreats you pity him:
He asks of you, that never used to beg.


26

II,1,648

Second Fisherman. Canst thou catch any fishes, then?

Pericles. I never practised it.


27

II,1,651

Second Fisherman. Nay, then thou wilt starve, sure; for here's nothing
to be got now-a-days, unless thou canst fish for't.

Pericles. What I have been I have forgot to know;
But what I am, want teaches me to think on:
A man throng'd up with cold: my veins are chill,
And have no more of life than may suffice
To give my tongue that heat to ask your help;
Which if you shall refuse, when I am dead,
For that I am a man, pray see me buried.


28

II,1,664

First Fisherman. Die quoth-a? Now gods forbid! I have a gown here;
come, put it on; keep thee warm. Now, afore me, a
handsome fellow! Come, thou shalt go home, and
we'll have flesh for holidays, fish for
fasting-days, and moreo'er puddings and flap-jacks,
and thou shalt be welcome.

Pericles. I thank you, sir.


29

II,1,666

Second Fisherman. Hark you, my friend; you said you could not beg.

Pericles. I did but crave.


30

II,1,669

Second Fisherman. But crave! Then I'll turn craver too, and so I
shall 'scape whipping.

Pericles. Why, are all your beggars whipped, then?


31

II,1,675

(stage directions). [Exit with Third Fisherman]

Pericles. [Aside] How well this honest mirth becomes their labour!


32

II,1,677

First Fisherman. Hark you, sir, do you know where ye are?

Pericles. Not well.


33

II,1,680

First Fisherman. Why, I'll tell you: this is called Pentapolis, and
our king the good Simonides.

Pericles. The good King Simonides, do you call him.


34

II,1,683

First Fisherman. Ay, sir; and he deserves so to be called for his
peaceable reign and good government.

Pericles. He is a happy king, since he gains from his subjects
the name of good by his government. How far is his
court distant from this shore?


35

II,1,690

First Fisherman. Marry, sir, half a day's journey: and I'll tell
you, he hath a fair daughter, and to-morrow is her
birth-day; and there are princes and knights come
from all parts of the world to just and tourney for her love.

Pericles. Were my fortunes equal to my desires, I could wish
to make one there.


36

II,1,699

Second Fisherman. Help, master, help! here's a fish hangs in the net,
like a poor man's right in the law; 'twill hardly
come out. Ha! bots on't, 'tis come at last, and
'tis turned to a rusty armour.

Pericles. An armour, friends! I pray you, let me see it.
Thanks, fortune, yet, that, after all my crosses,
Thou givest me somewhat to repair myself;
And though it was mine own, part of my heritage,
Which my dead father did bequeath to me.
With this strict charge, even as he left his life,
'Keep it, my Pericles; it hath been a shield
Twixt me and death;'—and pointed to this brace;—
'For that it saved me, keep it; in like necessity—
The which the gods protect thee from!—may
defend thee.'
It kept where I kept, I so dearly loved it;
Till the rough seas, that spare not any man,
Took it in rage, though calm'd have given't again:
I thank thee for't: my shipwreck now's no ill,
Since I have here my father's gift in's will.


37

II,1,716

First Fisherman. What mean you, sir?

Pericles. To beg of you, kind friends, this coat of worth,
For it was sometime target to a king;
I know it by this mark. He loved me dearly,
And for his sake I wish the having of it;
And that you'ld guide me to your sovereign's court,
Where with it I may appear a gentleman;
And if that ever my low fortune's better,
I'll pay your bounties; till then rest your debtor.


38

II,1,725

First Fisherman. Why, wilt thou tourney for the lady?

Pericles. I'll show the virtue I have borne in arms.


39

II,1,732

Second Fisherman. Ay, but hark you, my friend; 'twas we that made up
this garment through the rough seams of the waters:
there are certain condolements, certain vails. I
hope, sir, if you thrive, you'll remember from
whence you had it.

Pericles. Believe 't, I will.
By your furtherance I am clothed in steel;
And, spite of all the rapture of the sea,
This jewel holds his building on my arm:
Unto thy value I will mount myself
Upon a courser, whose delightful steps
Shall make the gazer joy to see him tread.
Only, my friend, I yet am unprovided
Of a pair of bases.


40

II,1,743

Second Fisherman. We'll sure provide: thou shalt have my best gown to
make thee a pair; and I'll bring thee to the court myself.

Pericles. Then honour be but a goal to my will,
This day I'll rise, or else add ill to ill.


41

II,3,832

Thaisa. But you, my knight and guest;
To whom this wreath of victory I give,
And crown you king of this day's happiness.

Pericles. 'Tis more by fortune, lady, than by merit.


42

II,3,845

Marshal. Sir, yonder is your place.

Pericles. Some other is more fit.


43

II,3,849

First Knight. Contend not, sir; for we are gentlemen
That neither in our hearts nor outward eyes
Envy the great nor do the low despise.

Pericles. You are right courteous knights.


44

II,3,851

Simonides. Sit, sir, sit.

Pericles. By Jove, I wonder, that is king of thoughts,
These cates resist me, she but thought upon.


45

II,3,860

Thaisa. To me he seems like diamond to glass.

Pericles. Yon king's to me like to my father's picture,
Which tells me in that glory once he was;
Had princes sit, like stars, about his throne,
And he the sun, for them to reverence;
None that beheld him, but, like lesser lights,
Did vail their crowns to his supremacy:
Where now his son's like a glow-worm in the night,
The which hath fire in darkness, none in light:
Whereby I see that Time's the king of men,
He's both their parent, and he is their grave,
And gives them what he will, not what they crave.


46

II,3,902

Thaisa. The king my father, sir, has drunk to you.

Pericles. I thank him.


47

II,3,904

Thaisa. Wishing it so much blood unto your life.

Pericles. I thank both him and you, and pledge him freely.


48

II,3,907

Thaisa. And further he desires to know of you,
Of whence you are, your name and parentage.

Pericles. A gentleman of Tyre; my name, Pericles;
My education been in arts and arms;
Who, looking for adventures in the world,
Was by the rough seas reft of ships and men,
And after shipwreck driven upon this shore.


49

II,3,932

Simonides. Now, by the gods, I pity his misfortune,
And will awake him from his melancholy.
Come, gentlemen, we sit too long on trifles,
And waste the time, which looks for other revels.
Even in your armours, as you are address'd,
Will very well become a soldier's dance.
I will not have excuse, with saying this
Loud music is too harsh for ladies' heads,
Since they love men in arms as well as beds.
[The Knights dance]
So, this was well ask'd,'twas so well perform'd.
Come, sir;
Here is a lady that wants breathing too:
And I have heard, you knights of Tyre
Are excellent in making ladies trip;
And that their measures are as excellent.

Pericles. In those that practise them they are, my lord.


50

II,3,944

Simonides. O, that's as much as you would be denied
Of your fair courtesy.
[The Knights and Ladies dance]
Unclasp, unclasp:
Thanks, gentlemen, to all; all have done well.
[To PERICLES]
But you the best. Pages and lights, to conduct
These knights unto their several lodgings!
[To PERICLES]
Yours, sir,
We have given order to be next our own.

Pericles. I am at your grace's pleasure.


51

II,5,1039

(stage directions). [Enter PERICLES]

Pericles. All fortune to the good Simonides!


52

II,5,1044

Simonides. To you as much, sir! I am beholding to you
For your sweet music this last night: I do
Protest my ears were never better fed
With such delightful pleasing harmony.

Pericles. It is your grace's pleasure to commend;
Not my desert.


53

II,5,1047

Simonides. Sir, you are music's master.

Pericles. The worst of all her scholars, my good lord.


54

II,5,1050

Simonides. Let me ask you one thing:
What do you think of my daughter, sir?

Pericles. A most virtuous princess.


55

II,5,1052

Simonides. And she is fair too, is she not?

Pericles. As a fair day in summer, wondrous fair.


56

II,5,1056

Simonides. Sir, my daughter thinks very well of you;
Ay, so well, that you must be her master,
And she will be your scholar: therefore look to it.

Pericles. I am unworthy for her schoolmaster.


57

II,5,1058

Simonides. She thinks not so; peruse this writing else.

Pericles. [Aside] What's here?
A letter, that she loves the knight of Tyre!
'Tis the king's subtlety to have my life.
O, seek not to entrap me, gracious lord,
A stranger and distressed gentleman,
That never aim'd so high to love your daughter,
But bent all offices to honour her.


58

II,5,1067

Simonides. Thou hast bewitch'd my daughter, and thou art
A villain.

Pericles. By the gods, I have not:
Never did thought of mine levy offence;
Nor never did my actions yet commence
A deed might gain her love or your displeasure.


59

II,5,1072

Simonides. Traitor, thou liest.

Pericles. Traitor!


60

II,5,1074

Simonides. Ay, traitor.

Pericles. Even in his throat—unless it be the king—
That calls me traitor, I return the lie.


61

II,5,1077

Simonides. [Aside] Now, by the gods, I do applaud his courage.

Pericles. My actions are as noble as my thoughts,
That never relish'd of a base descent.
I came unto your court for honour's cause,
And not to be a rebel to her state;
And he that otherwise accounts of me,
This sword shall prove he's honour's enemy.


62

II,5,1086

(stage directions). [Enter THAISA]

Pericles. Then, as you are as virtuous as fair,
Resolve your angry father, if my tongue
Did ere solicit, or my hand subscribe
To any syllable that made love to you.


63

II,5,1112

Thaisa. Yes, if you love me, sir.

Pericles. Even as my life, or blood that fosters it.


64

III,1,1191

(stage directions). [Enter PERICLES, on shipboard]

Pericles. Thou god of this great vast, rebuke these surges,
Which wash both heaven and hell; and thou, that hast
Upon the winds command, bind them in brass,
Having call'd them from the deep! O, still
Thy deafening, dreadful thunders; gently quench
Thy nimble, sulphurous flashes! O, how, Lychorida,
How does my queen? Thou stormest venomously;
Wilt thou spit all thyself? The seaman's whistle
Is as a whisper in the ears of death,
Unheard. Lychorida!—Lucina, O
Divinest patroness, and midwife gentle
To those that cry by night, convey thy deity
Aboard our dancing boat; make swift the pangs
Of my queen's travails!
[Enter LYCHORIDA, with an Infant]
Now, Lychorida!


65

III,1,1211

Lychorida. Here is a thing too young for such a place,
Who, if it had conceit, would die, as I
Am like to do: take in your arms this piece
Of your dead queen.

Pericles. How, how, Lychorida!


66

III,1,1216

Lychorida. Patience, good sir; do not assist the storm.
Here's all that is left living of your queen,
A little daughter: for the sake of it,
Be manly, and take comfort.

Pericles. O you gods!
Why do you make us love your goodly gifts,
And snatch them straight away? We here below
Recall not what we give, and therein may
Use honour with you.


67

III,1,1223

Lychorida. Patience, good sir,
Even for this charge.

Pericles. Now, mild may be thy life!
For a more blustrous birth had never babe:
Quiet and gentle thy conditions! for
Thou art the rudeliest welcome to this world
That ever was prince's child. Happy what follows!
Thou hast as chiding a nativity
As fire, air, water, earth, and heaven can make,
To herald thee from the womb: even at the first
Thy loss is more than can thy portage quit,
With all thou canst find here. Now, the good gods
Throw their best eyes upon't!


68

III,1,1236

First Sailor. What courage, sir? God save you!

Pericles. Courage enough: I do not fear the flaw;
It hath done to me the worst. Yet, for the love
Of this poor infant, this fresh-new sea-farer,
I would it would be quiet.


69

III,1,1247

First Sailor. Sir, your queen must overboard: the sea works high,
the wind is loud, and will not lie till the ship be
cleared of the dead.

Pericles. That's your superstition.


70

III,1,1251

First Sailor. Pardon us, sir; with us at sea it hath been still
observed: and we are strong in custom. Therefore
briefly yield her; for she must overboard straight.

Pericles. As you think meet. Most wretched queen!


71

III,1,1253

Lychorida. Here she lies, sir.

Pericles. A terrible childbed hast thou had, my dear;
No light, no fire: the unfriendly elements
Forgot thee utterly: nor have I time
To give thee hallow'd to thy grave, but straight
Must cast thee, scarcely coffin'd, in the ooze;
Where, for a monument upon thy bones,
And e'er-remaining lamps, the belching whale
And humming water must o'erwhelm thy corpse,
Lying with simple shells. O Lychorida,
Bid Nestor bring me spices, ink and paper,
My casket and my jewels; and bid Nicander
Bring me the satin coffer: lay the babe
Upon the pillow: hie thee, whiles I say
A priestly farewell to her: suddenly, woman.


72

III,1,1270

Second Sailor. Sir, we have a chest beneath the hatches, caulked
and bitumed ready.

Pericles. I thank thee. Mariner, say what coast is this?


73

III,1,1272

Second Sailor. We are near Tarsus.

Pericles. Thither, gentle mariner.
Alter thy course for Tyre. When canst thou reach it?


74

III,1,1275

Second Sailor. By break of day, if the wind cease.

Pericles. O, make for Tarsus!
There will I visit Cleon, for the babe
Cannot hold out to Tyrus: there I'll leave it
At careful nursing. Go thy ways, good mariner:
I'll bring the body presently.


75

III,3,1423

(stage directions). [Enter PERICLES, CLEON, DIONYZA, and LYCHORIDA with]
MARINA in her arms]

Pericles. Most honour'd Cleon, I must needs be gone;
My twelve months are expired, and Tyrus stands
In a litigious peace. You, and your lady,
Take from my heart all thankfulness! The gods
Make up the rest upon you!


76

III,3,1433

Dionyza. O your sweet queen!
That the strict fates had pleased you had brought her hither,
To have bless'd mine eyes with her!

Pericles. We cannot but obey
The powers above us. Could I rage and roar
As doth the sea she lies in, yet the end
Must be as 'tis. My gentle babe Marina, whom,
For she was born at sea, I have named so, here
I charge your charity withal, leaving her
The infant of your care; beseeching you
To give her princely training, that she may be
Manner'd as she is born.


77

III,3,1451

Cleon. Fear not, my lord, but think
Your grace, that fed my country with your corn,
For which the people's prayers still fall upon you,
Must in your child be thought on. If neglection
Should therein make me vile, the common body,
By you relieved, would force me to my duty:
But if to that my nature need a spur,
The gods revenge it upon me and mine,
To the end of generation!

Pericles. I believe you;
Your honour and your goodness teach me to't,
Without your vows. Till she be married, madam,
By bright Diana, whom we honour, all
Unscissor'd shall this hair of mine remain,
Though I show ill in't. So I take my leave.
Good madam, make me blessed in your care
In bringing up my child.


78

III,3,1462

Dionyza. I have one myself,
Who shall not be more dear to my respect
Than yours, my lord.

Pericles. Madam, my thanks and prayers.


79

III,3,1466

Cleon. We'll bring your grace e'en to the edge o' the shore,
Then give you up to the mask'd Neptune and
The gentlest winds of heaven.

Pericles. I will embrace
Your offer. Come, dearest madam. O, no tears,
Lychorida, no tears:
Look to your little mistress, on whose grace
You may depend hereafter. Come, my lord.


80

V,1,2276

Marina. Hail, sir! my lord, lend ear.

Pericles. Hum, ha!


81

V,1,2292

Marina. I am a maid,
My lord, that ne'er before invited eyes,
But have been gazed on like a comet: she speaks,
My lord, that, may be, hath endured a grief
Might equal yours, if both were justly weigh'd.
Though wayward fortune did malign my state,
My derivation was from ancestors
Who stood equivalent with mighty kings:
But time hath rooted out my parentage,
And to the world and awkward casualties
Bound me in servitude.
[Aside]
I will desist;
But there is something glows upon my cheek,
And whispers in mine ear, 'Go not till he speak.'

Pericles. My fortunes—parentage—good parentage—
To equal mine!—was it not thus? what say you?


82

V,1,2296

Marina. I said, my lord, if you did know my parentage,
You would not do me violence.

Pericles. I do think so. Pray you, turn your eyes upon me.
You are like something that—What country-woman?
Here of these shores?


83

V,1,2302

Marina. No, nor of any shores:
Yet I was mortally brought forth, and am
No other than I appear.

Pericles. I am great with woe, and shall deliver weeping.
My dearest wife was like this maid, and such a one
My daughter might have been: my queen's square brows;
Her stature to an inch; as wand-like straight;
As silver-voiced; her eyes as jewel-like
And cased as richly; in pace another Juno;
Who starves the ears she feeds, and makes them hungry,
The more she gives them speech. Where do you live?


84

V,1,2312

Marina. Where I am but a stranger: from the deck
You may discern the place.

Pericles. Where were you bred?
And how achieved you these endowments, which
You make more rich to owe?


85

V,1,2317

Marina. If I should tell my history, it would seem
Like lies disdain'd in the reporting.

Pericles. Prithee, speak:
Falseness cannot come from thee; for thou look'st
Modest as Justice, and thou seem'st a palace
For the crown'd Truth to dwell in: I will
believe thee,
And make my senses credit thy relation
To points that seem impossible; for thou look'st
Like one I loved indeed. What were thy friends?
Didst thou not say, when I did push thee back—
Which was when I perceived thee—that thou camest
From good descending?


86

V,1,2329

Marina. So indeed I did.

Pericles. Report thy parentage. I think thou said'st
Thou hadst been toss'd from wrong to injury,
And that thou thought'st thy griefs might equal mine,
If both were open'd.


87

V,1,2336

Marina. Some such thing
I said, and said no more but what my thoughts
Did warrant me was likely.

Pericles. Tell thy story;
If thine consider'd prove the thousandth part
Of my endurance, thou art a man, and I
Have suffer'd like a girl: yet thou dost look
Like Patience gazing on kings' graves, and smiling
Extremity out of act. What were thy friends?
How lost thou them? Thy name, my most kind virgin?
Recount, I do beseech thee: come, sit by me.


88

V,1,2345

Marina. My name is Marina.

Pericles. O, I am mock'd,
And thou by some incensed god sent hither
To make the world to laugh at me.


89

V,1,2350

Marina. Patience, good sir,
Or here I'll cease.

Pericles. Nay, I'll be patient.
Thou little know'st how thou dost startle me,
To call thyself Marina.


90

V,1,2356

Marina. The name
Was given me by one that had some power,
My father, and a king.

Pericles. How! a king's daughter?
And call'd Marina?


91

V,1,2361

Marina. You said you would believe me;
But, not to be a troubler of your peace,
I will end here.

Pericles. But are you flesh and blood?
Have you a working pulse? and are no fairy?
Motion! Well; speak on. Where were you born?
And wherefore call'd Marina?


92

V,1,2367

Marina. Call'd Marina
For I was born at sea.

Pericles. At sea! what mother?


93

V,1,2372

Marina. My mother was the daughter of a king;
Who died the minute I was born,
As my good nurse Lychorida hath oft
Deliver'd weeping.

Pericles. O, stop there a little!
[Aside]
This is the rarest dream that e'er dull sleep
Did mock sad fools withal: this cannot be:
My daughter's buried. Well: where were you bred?
I'll hear you more, to the bottom of your story,
And never interrupt you.


94

V,1,2380

Marina. You scorn: believe me, 'twere best I did give o'er.

Pericles. I will believe you by the syllable
Of what you shall deliver. Yet, give me leave:
How came you in these parts? where were you bred?


95

V,1,2394

Marina. The king my father did in Tarsus leave me;
Till cruel Cleon, with his wicked wife,
Did seek to murder me: and having woo'd
A villain to attempt it, who having drawn to do't,
A crew of pirates came and rescued me;
Brought me to Mytilene. But, good sir,
Whither will you have me? Why do you weep?
It may be,
You think me an impostor: no, good faith;
I am the daughter to King Pericles,
If good King Pericles be.

Pericles. Ho, Helicanus!


96

V,1,2396

Helicanus. Calls my lord?

Pericles. Thou art a grave and noble counsellor,
Most wise in general: tell me, if thou canst,
What this maid is, or what is like to be,
That thus hath made me weep?


97

V,1,2406

Lysimachus. She would never tell
Her parentage; being demanded that,
She would sit still and weep.

Pericles. O Helicanus, strike me, honour'd sir;
Give me a gash, put me to present pain;
Lest this great sea of joys rushing upon me
O'erbear the shores of my mortality,
And drown me with their sweetness. O, come hither,
Thou that beget'st him that did thee beget;
Thou that wast born at sea, buried at Tarsus,
And found at sea again! O Helicanus,
Down on thy knees, thank the holy gods as loud
As thunder threatens us: this is Marina.
What was thy mother's name? tell me but that,
For truth can never be confirm'd enough,
Though doubts did ever sleep.


98

V,1,2421

Marina. First, sir, I pray,
What is your title?

Pericles. I am Pericles of Tyre: but tell me now
My drown'd queen's name, as in the rest you said
Thou hast been godlike perfect,
The heir of kingdoms and another like
To Pericles thy father.


99

V,1,2430

Marina. Is it no more to be your daughter than
To say my mother's name was Thaisa?
Thaisa was my mother, who did end
The minute I began.

Pericles. Now, blessing on thee! rise; thou art my child.
Give me fresh garments. Mine own, Helicanus;
She is not dead at Tarsus, as she should have been,
By savage Cleon: she shall tell thee all;
When thou shalt kneel, and justify in knowledge
She is thy very princess. Who is this?


100

V,1,2439

Helicanus. Sir, 'tis the governor of Mytilene,
Who, hearing of your melancholy state,
Did come to see you.

Pericles. I embrace you.
Give me my robes. I am wild in my beholding.
O heavens bless my girl! But, hark, what music?
Tell Helicanus, my Marina, tell him
O'er, point by point, for yet he seems to doubt,
How sure you are my daughter. But, what music?


101

V,1,2446

Helicanus. My lord, I hear none.

Pericles. None!
The music of the spheres! List, my Marina.


102

V,1,2449

Lysimachus. It is not good to cross him; give him way.

Pericles. Rarest sounds! Do ye not hear?


103

V,1,2452

(stage directions). [Music]

Pericles. Most heavenly music!
It nips me unto listening, and thick slumber
Hangs upon mine eyes: let me rest.


104

V,1,2473

(stage directions). [Disappears]

Pericles. Celestial Dian, goddess argentine,
I will obey thee. Helicanus!


105

V,1,2477

Helicanus. Sir?

Pericles. My purpose was for Tarsus, there to strike
The inhospitable Cleon; but I am
For other service first: toward Ephesus
Turn our blown sails; eftsoons I'll tell thee why.
[To LYSIMACHUS]
Shall we refresh us, sir, upon your shore,
And give you gold for such provision
As our intents will need?


106

V,1,2488

Lysimachus. Sir,
With all my heart; and, when you come ashore,
I have another suit.

Pericles. You shall prevail,
Were it to woo my daughter; for it seems
You have been noble towards her.


107

V,1,2492

Lysimachus. Sir, lend me your arm.

Pericles. Come, my Marina.


108

V,3,2521

(stage directions). near the altar, as high priestess; a number of
Virgins on each side; CERIMON and other Inhabitants
of Ephesus attending.
[Enter PERICLES, with his train; LYSIMACHUS,]
HELICANUS, MARINA, and a Lady]

Pericles. Hail, Dian! to perform thy just command,
I here confess myself the king of Tyre;
Who, frighted from my country, did wed
At Pentapolis the fair Thaisa.
At sea in childbed died she, but brought forth
A maid-child call'd Marina; who, O goddess,
Wears yet thy silver livery. She at Tarsus
Was nursed with Cleon; who at fourteen years
He sought to murder: but her better stars
Brought her to Mytilene; 'gainst whose shore
Riding, her fortunes brought the maid aboard us,
Where, by her own most clear remembrance, she
Made known herself my daughter.


109

V,3,2537

(stage directions). [Faints]

Pericles. What means the nun? she dies! help, gentlemen!


110

V,3,2541

Cerimon. Noble sir,
If you have told Diana's altar true,
This is your wife.

Pericles. Reverend appearer, no;
I threw her overboard with these very arms.


111

V,3,2544

Cerimon. Upon this coast, I warrant you.

Pericles. 'Tis most certain.


112

V,3,2550

Cerimon. Look to the lady; O, she's but o'erjoy'd.
Early in blustering morn this lady was
Thrown upon this shore. I oped the coffin,
Found there rich jewels; recover'd her, and placed her
Here in Diana's temple.

Pericles. May we see them?


113

V,3,2560

Thaisa. O, let me look!
If he be none of mine, my sanctity
Will to my sense bend no licentious ear,
But curb it, spite of seeing. O, my lord,
Are you not Pericles? Like him you spake,
Like him you are: did you not name a tempest,
A birth, and death?

Pericles. The voice of dead Thaisa!


114

V,3,2563

Thaisa. That Thaisa am I, supposed dead
And drown'd.

Pericles. Immortal Dian!


115

V,3,2568

(stage directions). [Shows a ring]

Pericles. This, this: no more, you gods! your present kindness
Makes my past miseries sports: you shall do well,
That on the touching of her lips I may
Melt and no more be seen. O, come, be buried
A second time within these arms.


116

V,3,2576

(stage directions). [Kneels to THAISA]

Pericles. Look, who kneels here! Flesh of thy flesh, Thaisa;
Thy burden at the sea, and call'd Marina
For she was yielded there.


117

V,3,2582

Thaisa. I know you not.

Pericles. You have heard me say, when I did fly from Tyre,
I left behind an ancient substitute:
Can you remember what I call'd the man?
I have named him oft.


118

V,3,2587

Thaisa. 'Twas Helicanus then.

Pericles. Still confirmation:
Embrace him, dear Thaisa; this is he.
Now do I long to hear how you were found;
How possibly preserved; and who to thank,
Besides the gods, for this great miracle.


119

V,3,2595

Thaisa. Lord Cerimon, my lord; this man,
Through whom the gods have shown their power; that can
From first to last resolve you.

Pericles. Reverend sir,
The gods can have no mortal officer
More like a god than you. Will you deliver
How this dead queen re-lives?


120

V,3,2604

Cerimon. I will, my lord.
Beseech you, first go with me to my house,
Where shall be shown you all was found with her;
How she came placed here in the temple;
No needful thing omitted.

Pericles. Pure Dian, bless thee for thy vision! I
Will offer night-oblations to thee. Thaisa,
This prince, the fair-betrothed of your daughter,
Shall marry her at Pentapolis. And now,
This ornament
Makes me look dismal will I clip to form;
And what this fourteen years no razor touch'd,
To grace thy marriage-day, I'll beautify.


121

V,3,2614

Thaisa. Lord Cerimon hath letters of good credit, sir,
My father's dead.

Pericles. Heavens make a star of him! Yet there, my queen,
We'll celebrate their nuptials, and ourselves
Will in that kingdom spend our following days:
Our son and daughter shall in Tyrus reign.
Lord Cerimon, we do our longing stay
To hear the rest untold: sir, lead's the way.


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