Speeches (Lines) for Patroclus
in "Troilus and Cressida"

Total: 37

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,947

Good words, Thersites.

2

II,1,970

No more words, Thersites; peace!

3

II,1,977

A good riddance.

4

II,3,1238

Who's there? Thersites! Good Thersites, come in and rail.

5

II,3,1249

What, art thou devout? wast thou in prayer?

6

II,3,1253

Thersites, my lord.

7

II,3,1259

Thy lord, Thersites: then tell me, I pray thee,
what's thyself?

8

II,3,1263

Thou mayst tell that knowest.

9

II,3,1268

You rascal!

10

II,3,1278

Why am I a fool?

11

II,3,1292

Within his tent; but ill disposed, my lord.

12

II,3,1299

I shall say so to him.

13

II,3,1324

Achilles bids me say, he is much sorry,
If any thing more than your sport and pleasure
Did move your greatness and this noble state
To call upon him; he hopes it is no other
But for your health and your digestion sake,
And after-dinner's breath.

14

II,3,1358

I shall; and bring his answer presently.

15

III,3,1942

They pass by strangely: they were used to bend
To send their smiles before them to Achilles;
To come as humbly as they used to creep
To holy altars.

16

III,3,2097

To this effect, Achilles, have I moved you:
A woman impudent and mannish grown
Is not more loathed than an effeminate man
In time of action. I stand condemn'd for this;
They think my little stomach to the war
And your great love to me restrains you thus:
Sweet, rouse yourself; and the weak wanton Cupid
Shall from your neck unloose his amorous fold,
And, like a dew-drop from the lion's mane,
Be shook to air.

17

III,3,2108

Ay, and perhaps receive much honour by him.

18

III,3,2111

O, then, beware;
Those wounds heal ill that men do give themselves:
Omission to do what is necessary
Seals a commission to a blank of danger;
And danger, like an ague, subtly taints
Even then when we sit idly in the sun.

19

III,3,2163

Jove bless great Ajax!

20

III,3,2165

I come from the worthy Achilles,—

21

III,3,2167

Who most humbly desires you to invite Hector to his tent,—

22

III,3,2169

And to procure safe-conduct from Agamemnon.

23

III,3,2171

Ay, my lord.

24

III,3,2173

What say you to't?

25

III,3,2175

Your answer, sir.

26

III,3,2179

Your answer, sir.

27

IV,5,2626

But that's no argument for kissing now;
For this popp'd Paris in his hardiment,
And parted thus you and your argument.

28

IV,5,2631

The first was Menelaus' kiss; this, mine:
Patroclus kisses you.

29

IV,5,2634

Paris and I kiss evermore for him.

30

IV,5,2637

Both take and give.

31

V,1,2933

Here comes Thersites.

32

V,1,2941

Who keeps the tent now?

33

V,1,2943

Well said, adversity! and what need these tricks?

34

V,1,2946

Male varlet, you rogue! what's that?

35

V,1,2955

Why thou damnable box of envy, thou, what meanest
thou to curse thus?

36

V,1,2958

Why no, you ruinous butt, you whoreson
indistinguishable cur, no.

37

V,1,2965

Out, gall!

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