Speeches (Lines) for Messenger
in "Antony and Cleopatra"

Total: 42

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,170

Fulvia thy wife first came into the field.

2

I,2,172

Ay:
But soon that war had end, and the time's state...

3

I,2,178

The nature of bad news infects the teller.

4

I,2,183

Labienus—
This is stiff news—hath, with his Parthian force,...

5

I,2,189

O, my lord!

6

I,2,197

At your noble pleasure.

7

I,4,461

Thy biddings have been done; and every hour,
Most noble Caesar, shalt thou have report...

8

I,4,476

Caesar, I bring thee word,
Menecrates and Menas, famous pirates,...

9

II,5,1081

Madam, madam,—

10

II,5,1087

First, madam, he is well.

11

II,5,1093

Good madam, hear me.

12

II,5,1100

Will't please you hear me?

13

II,5,1106

Madam, he's well.

14

II,5,1108

And friends with Caesar.

15

II,5,1110

Caesar and he are greater friends than ever.

16

II,5,1112

But yet, madam,—

17

II,5,1120

Free, madam! no; I made no such report:
He's bound unto Octavia.

18

II,5,1123

For the best turn i' the bed.

19

II,5,1125

Madam, he's married to Octavia.

20

II,5,1128

Good madam, patience.

21

II,5,1136

Gracious madam,
I that do bring the news made not the match.

22

II,5,1143

He's married, madam.

23

II,5,1146

Nay, then I'll run.
What mean you, madam? I have made no fault.

24

II,5,1167

I have done my duty.

25

II,5,1171

He's married, madam.

26

II,5,1173

Should I lie, madam?

27

II,5,1179

I crave your highness' pardon.

28

II,5,1181

Take no offence that I would not offend you:
To punish me for what you make me do....

29

III,3,1693

Most gracious majesty,—

30

III,3,1695

Ay, dread queen.

31

III,3,1697

Madam, in Rome;
I look'd her in the face, and saw her led...

32

III,3,1701

She is not, madam.

33

III,3,1703

Madam, I heard her speak; she is low-voiced.

34

III,3,1709

She creeps:
Her motion and her station are as one;...

35

III,3,1714

Or I have no observance.

36

III,3,1722

Madam,
She was a widow,—

37

III,3,1725

And I do think she's thirty.

38

III,3,1727

Round even to faultiness.

39

III,3,1730

Brown, madam: and her forehead
As low as she would wish it.

40

III,7,2005

The news is true, my lord; he is descried;
Caesar has taken Toryne.

41

III,7,2039

The emperor calls Canidius.

42

IV,6,2713

Antony
Is come into the field.

Return to the "Antony and Cleopatra" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS