Speeches (Lines) for Messenger
in "Antony and Cleopatra"

Total: 42

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,170

(stage directions). [Enter MARK ANTONY with a Messenger and Attendants]

Messenger. Fulvia thy wife first came into the field.


2

I,2,172

Antony. Against my brother Lucius?

Messenger. Ay:
But soon that war had end, and the time's state
Made friends of them, joining their force 'gainst Caesar;
Whose better issue in the war, from Italy,
Upon the first encounter, drave them.


3

I,2,178

Antony. Well, what worst?

Messenger. The nature of bad news infects the teller.


4

I,2,183

Antony. When it concerns the fool or coward. On:
Things that are past are done with me. 'Tis thus:
Who tells me true, though in his tale lie death,
I hear him as he flatter'd.

Messenger. Labienus—
This is stiff news—hath, with his Parthian force,
Extended Asia from Euphrates;
His conquering banner shook from Syria
To Lydia and to Ionia; Whilst—


5

I,2,189

Antony. Antony, thou wouldst say,—

Messenger. O, my lord!


6

I,2,197

Antony. Speak to me home, mince not the general tongue:
Name Cleopatra as she is call'd in Rome;
Rail thou in Fulvia's phrase; and taunt my faults
With such full licence as both truth and malice
Have power to utter. O, then we bring forth weeds,
When our quick minds lie still; and our ills told us
Is as our earing. Fare thee well awhile.

Messenger. At your noble pleasure.


7

I,4,461

Lepidus. Here's more news.

Messenger. Thy biddings have been done; and every hour,
Most noble Caesar, shalt thou have report
How 'tis abroad. Pompey is strong at sea;
And it appears he is beloved of those
That only have fear'd Caesar: to the ports
The discontents repair, and men's reports
Give him much wrong'd.


8

I,4,476

Octavius. I should have known no less.
It hath been taught us from the primal state,
That he which is was wish'd until he were;
And the ebb'd man, ne'er loved till ne'er worth love,
Comes dear'd by being lack'd. This common body,
Like to a vagabond flag upon the stream,
Goes to and back, lackeying the varying tide,
To rot itself with motion.

Messenger. Caesar, I bring thee word,
Menecrates and Menas, famous pirates,
Make the sea serve them, which they ear and wound
With keels of every kind: many hot inroads
They make in Italy; the borders maritime
Lack blood to think on't, and flush youth revolt:
No vessel can peep forth, but 'tis as soon
Taken as seen; for Pompey's name strikes more
Than could his war resisted.


9

II,5,1081

Cleopatra. That time,—O times!—
I laugh'd him out of patience; and that night
I laugh'd him into patience; and next morn,
Ere the ninth hour, I drunk him to his bed;
Then put my tires and mantles on him, whilst
I wore his sword Philippan.
[Enter a Messenger]
O, from Italy
Ram thou thy fruitful tidings in mine ears,
That long time have been barren.

Messenger. Madam, madam,—


10

II,5,1087

Cleopatra. Antonius dead!—If thou say so, villain,
Thou kill'st thy mistress: but well and free,
If thou so yield him, there is gold, and here
My bluest veins to kiss; a hand that kings
Have lipp'd, and trembled kissing.

Messenger. First, madam, he is well.


11

II,5,1093

Cleopatra. Why, there's more gold.
But, sirrah, mark, we use
To say the dead are well: bring it to that,
The gold I give thee will I melt and pour
Down thy ill-uttering throat.

Messenger. Good madam, hear me.


12

II,5,1100

Cleopatra. Well, go to, I will;
But there's no goodness in thy face: if Antony
Be free and healthful,—so tart a favour
To trumpet such good tidings! If not well,
Thou shouldst come like a Fury crown'd with snakes,
Not like a formal man.

Messenger. Will't please you hear me?


13

II,5,1106

Cleopatra. I have a mind to strike thee ere thou speak'st:
Yet if thou say Antony lives, is well,
Or friends with Caesar, or not captive to him,
I'll set thee in a shower of gold, and hail
Rich pearls upon thee.

Messenger. Madam, he's well.


14

II,5,1108

Cleopatra. Well said.

Messenger. And friends with Caesar.


15

II,5,1110

Cleopatra. Thou'rt an honest man.

Messenger. Caesar and he are greater friends than ever.


16

II,5,1112

Cleopatra. Make thee a fortune from me.

Messenger. But yet, madam,—


17

II,5,1120

Cleopatra. I do not like 'But yet,' it does allay
The good precedence; fie upon 'But yet'!
'But yet' is as a gaoler to bring forth
Some monstrous malefactor. Prithee, friend,
Pour out the pack of matter to mine ear,
The good and bad together: he's friends with Caesar:
In state of health thou say'st; and thou say'st free.

Messenger. Free, madam! no; I made no such report:
He's bound unto Octavia.


18

II,5,1123

Cleopatra. For what good turn?

Messenger. For the best turn i' the bed.


19

II,5,1125

Cleopatra. I am pale, Charmian.

Messenger. Madam, he's married to Octavia.


20

II,5,1128

(stage directions). [Strikes him down]

Messenger. Good madam, patience.


21

II,5,1136

Cleopatra. What say you? Hence,
[Strikes him again]
Horrible villain! or I'll spurn thine eyes
Like balls before me; I'll unhair thy head:
[She hales him up and down]
Thou shalt be whipp'd with wire, and stew'd in brine,
Smarting in lingering pickle.

Messenger. Gracious madam,
I that do bring the news made not the match.


22

II,5,1143

Cleopatra. Say 'tis not so, a province I will give thee,
And make thy fortunes proud: the blow thou hadst
Shall make thy peace for moving me to rage;
And I will boot thee with what gift beside
Thy modesty can beg.

Messenger. He's married, madam.


23

II,5,1146

(stage directions). [Draws a knife]

Messenger. Nay, then I'll run.
What mean you, madam? I have made no fault.


24

II,5,1167

Cleopatra. I will not hurt him.
[Exit CHARMIAN]
These hands do lack nobility, that they strike
A meaner than myself; since I myself
Have given myself the cause.
[Re-enter CHARMIAN and Messenger]
Come hither, sir.
Though it be honest, it is never good
To bring bad news: give to a gracious message.
An host of tongues; but let ill tidings tell
Themselves when they be felt.

Messenger. I have done my duty.


25

II,5,1171

Cleopatra. Is he married?
I cannot hate thee worser than I do,
If thou again say 'Yes.'

Messenger. He's married, madam.


26

II,5,1173

Cleopatra. The gods confound thee! dost thou hold there still?

Messenger. Should I lie, madam?


27

II,5,1179

Cleopatra. O, I would thou didst,
So half my Egypt were submerged and made
A cistern for scaled snakes! Go, get thee hence:
Hadst thou Narcissus in thy face, to me
Thou wouldst appear most ugly. He is married?

Messenger. I crave your highness' pardon.


28

II,5,1181

Cleopatra. He is married?

Messenger. Take no offence that I would not offend you:
To punish me for what you make me do.
Seems much unequal: he's married to Octavia.


29

III,3,1693

Cleopatra. That Herod's head
I'll have: but how, when Antony is gone
Through whom I might command it? Come thou near.

Messenger. Most gracious majesty,—


30

III,3,1695

Cleopatra. Didst thou behold Octavia?

Messenger. Ay, dread queen.


31

III,3,1697

Cleopatra. Where?

Messenger. Madam, in Rome;
I look'd her in the face, and saw her led
Between her brother and Mark Antony.


32

III,3,1701

Cleopatra. Is she as tall as me?

Messenger. She is not, madam.


33

III,3,1703

Cleopatra. Didst hear her speak? is she shrill-tongued or low?

Messenger. Madam, I heard her speak; she is low-voiced.


34

III,3,1709

Cleopatra. I think so, Charmian: dull of tongue, and dwarfish!
What majesty is in her gait? Remember,
If e'er thou look'dst on majesty.

Messenger. She creeps:
Her motion and her station are as one;
She shows a body rather than a life,
A statue than a breather.


35

III,3,1714

Cleopatra. Is this certain?

Messenger. Or I have no observance.


36

III,3,1722

Cleopatra. Guess at her years, I prithee.

Messenger. Madam,
She was a widow,—


37

III,3,1725

Cleopatra. Widow! Charmian, hark.

Messenger. And I do think she's thirty.


38

III,3,1727

Cleopatra. Bear'st thou her face in mind? is't long or round?

Messenger. Round even to faultiness.


39

III,3,1730

Cleopatra. For the most part, too, they are foolish that are so.
Her hair, what colour?

Messenger. Brown, madam: and her forehead
As low as she would wish it.


40

III,7,2005

Antony. Our overplus of shipping will we burn;
And, with the rest full-mann'd, from the head of Actium
Beat the approaching Caesar. But if we fail,
We then can do't at land.
[Enter a Messenger]
Thy business?

Messenger. The news is true, my lord; he is descried;
Caesar has taken Toryne.


41

III,7,2039

(stage directions). [Enter a Messenger]

Messenger. The emperor calls Canidius.


42

IV,6,2713

(stage directions). [Enter a Messenger]

Messenger. Antony
Is come into the field.


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