Speeches (Lines) for Sir Thomas Lovell
in "Henry VIII"

Total: 21

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,590

Lord Chamberlain. Death! my lord,
Their clothes are after such a pagan cut too,
That, sure, they've worn out Christendom.
[Enter LOVELL]
How now!
What news, Sir Thomas Lovell?

Sir Thomas Lovell. Faith, my lord,
I hear of none, but the new proclamation
That's clapp'd upon the court-gate.


2

I,3,594

Lord Chamberlain. What is't for?

Sir Thomas Lovell. The reformation of our travell'd gallants,
That fill the court with quarrels, talk, and tailors.


3

I,3,599

Lord Chamberlain. I'm glad 'tis there: now I would pray our monsieurs
To think an English courtier may be wise,
And never see the Louvre.

Sir Thomas Lovell. They must either,
For so run the conditions, leave those remnants
Of fool and feather that they got in France,
With all their honourable point of ignorance
Pertaining thereunto, as fights and fireworks,
Abusing better men than they can be,
Out of a foreign wisdom, renouncing clean
The faith they have in tennis, and tall stockings,
Short blister'd breeches, and those types of travel,
And understand again like honest men;
Or pack to their old playfellows: there, I take it,
They may, 'cum privilegio,' wear away
The lag end of their lewdness and be laugh'd at.


4

I,3,616

Lord Chamberlain. What a loss our ladies
Will have of these trim vanities!

Sir Thomas Lovell. Ay, marry,
There will be woe indeed, lords: the sly whoresons
Have got a speeding trick to lay down ladies;
A French song and a fiddle has no fellow.


5

I,3,632

Lord Chamberlain. Sir Thomas,
Whither were you a-going?

Sir Thomas Lovell. To the cardinal's:
Your lordship is a guest too.


6

I,3,638

Lord Chamberlain. O, 'tis true:
This night he makes a supper, and a great one,
To many lords and ladies; there will be
The beauty of this kingdom, I'll assure you.

Sir Thomas Lovell. That churchman bears a bounteous mind indeed,
A hand as fruitful as the land that feeds us;
His dews fall every where.


7

I,4,675

Lord Sands. Sir Thomas Lovell, had the cardinal
But half my lay thoughts in him, some of these
Should find a running banquet ere they rested,
I think would better please 'em: by my life,
They are a sweet society of fair ones.

Sir Thomas Lovell. O, that your lordship were but now confessor
To one or two of these!


8

I,4,679

Lord Sands. I would I were;
They should find easy penance.

Sir Thomas Lovell. Faith, how easy?


9

I,4,801

Cardinal Wolsey. Sir Thomas Lovell, is the banquet ready
I' the privy chamber?

Sir Thomas Lovell. Yes, my lord.


10

II,1,913

Duke of Buckingham. All good people,
You that thus far have come to pity me,
Hear what I say, and then go home and lose me.
I have this day received a traitor's judgment,
And by that name must die: yet, heaven bear witness,
And if I have a conscience, let it sink me,
Even as the axe falls, if I be not faithful!
The law I bear no malice for my death;
'T has done, upon the premises, but justice:
But those that sought it I could wish more Christians:
Be what they will, I heartily forgive 'em:
Yet let 'em look they glory not in mischief,
Nor build their evils on the graves of great men;
For then my guiltless blood must cry against 'em.
For further life in this world I ne'er hope,
Nor will I sue, although the king have mercies
More than I dare make faults. You few that loved me,
And dare be bold to weep for Buckingham,
His noble friends and fellows, whom to leave
Is only bitter to him, only dying,
Go with me, like good angels, to my end;
And, as the long divorce of steel falls on me,
Make of your prayers one sweet sacrifice,
And lift my soul to heaven. Lead on, o' God's name.

Sir Thomas Lovell. I do beseech your grace, for charity,
If ever any malice in your heart
Were hid against me, now to forgive me frankly.


11

II,1,930

Duke of Buckingham. Sir Thomas Lovell, I as free forgive you
As I would be forgiven: I forgive all;
There cannot be those numberless offences
'Gainst me, that I cannot take peace with:
no black envy
Shall mark my grave. Commend me to his grace;
And if he speak of Buckingham, pray, tell him
You met him half in heaven: my vows and prayers
Yet are the king's; and, till my soul forsake,
Shall cry for blessings on him: may he live
Longer than I have time to tell his years!
Ever beloved and loving may his rule be!
And when old time shall lead him to his end,
Goodness and he fill up one monument!

Sir Thomas Lovell. To the water side I must conduct your grace;
Then give my charge up to Sir Nicholas Vaux,
Who undertakes you to your end.


12

V,1,2784

Gardiner. These should be hours for necessities,
Not for delights; times to repair our nature
With comforting repose, and not for us
To waste these times. Good hour of night, Sir Thomas!
Whither so late?

Sir Thomas Lovell. Came you from the king, my lord


13

V,1,2787

Gardiner. I did, Sir Thomas: and left him at primero
With the Duke of Suffolk.

Sir Thomas Lovell. I must to him too,
Before he go to bed. I'll take my leave.


14

V,1,2796

Gardiner. Not yet, Sir Thomas Lovell. What's the matter?
It seems you are in haste: an if there be
No great offence belongs to't, give your friend
Some touch of your late business: affairs, that walk,
As they say spirits do, at midnight, have
In them a wilder nature than the business
That seeks dispatch by day.

Sir Thomas Lovell. My lord, I love you;
And durst commend a secret to your ear
Much weightier than this work. The queen's in labour,
They say, in great extremity; and fear'd
She'll with the labour end.


15

V,1,2805

Gardiner. The fruit she goes with
I pray for heartily, that it may find
Good time, and live: but for the stock, Sir Thomas,
I wish it grubb'd up now.

Sir Thomas Lovell. Methinks I could
Cry the amen; and yet my conscience says
She's a good creature, and, sweet lady, does
Deserve our better wishes.


16

V,1,2816

Gardiner. But, sir, sir,
Hear me, Sir Thomas: you're a gentleman
Of mine own way; I know you wise, religious;
And, let me tell you, it will ne'er be well,
'Twill not, Sir Thomas Lovell, take't of me,
Till Cranmer, Cromwell, her two hands, and she,
Sleep in their graves.

Sir Thomas Lovell. Now, sir, you speak of two
The most remark'd i' the kingdom. As for Cromwell,
Beside that of the jewel house, is made master
O' the rolls, and the king's secretary; further, sir,
Stands in the gap and trade of moe preferments,
With which the time will load him. The archbishop
Is the king's hand and tongue; and who dare speak
One syllable against him?


17

V,1,2840

Gardiner. Yes, yes, Sir Thomas,
There are that dare; and I myself have ventured
To speak my mind of him: and indeed this day,
Sir, I may tell it you, I think I have
Incensed the lords o' the council, that he is,
For so I know he is, they know he is,
A most arch heretic, a pestilence
That does infect the land: with which they moved
Have broken with the king; who hath so far
Given ear to our complaint, of his great grace
And princely care foreseeing those fell mischiefs
Our reasons laid before him, hath commanded
To-morrow morning to the council-board
He be convented. He's a rank weed, Sir Thomas,
And we must root him out. From your affairs
I hinder you too long: good night, Sir Thomas.

Sir Thomas Lovell. Many good nights, my lord: I rest your servant.


18

V,1,2849

Henry VIII. But little, Charles;
Nor shall not, when my fancy's on my play.
Now, Lovell, from the queen what is the news?

Sir Thomas Lovell. I could not personally deliver to her
What you commanded me, but by her woman
I sent your message; who return'd her thanks
In the great'st humbleness, and desired your highness
Most heartily to pray for her.


19

V,1,2856

Henry VIII. What say'st thou, ha?
To pray for her? what, is she crying out?

Sir Thomas Lovell. So said her woman; and that her sufferance made
Almost each pang a death.


20

V,1,2881

(stage directions). [Exit DENNY]

Sir Thomas Lovell. [Aside] This is about that which the bishop spake:
I am happily come hither.


21

V,1,2988

Henry VIII. Lovell!

Sir Thomas Lovell. Sir?


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