Speeches (Lines) for Sir Thomas Lovell
in "Henry VIII"

Total: 21

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,590

Faith, my lord,
I hear of none, but the new proclamation
That's clapp'd upon the court-gate.

2

I,3,594

The reformation of our travell'd gallants,
That fill the court with quarrels, talk, and tailors.

3

I,3,599

They must either,
For so run the conditions, leave those remnants
Of fool and feather that they got in France,
With all their honourable point of ignorance
Pertaining thereunto, as fights and fireworks,
Abusing better men than they can be,
Out of a foreign wisdom, renouncing clean
The faith they have in tennis, and tall stockings,
Short blister'd breeches, and those types of travel,
And understand again like honest men;
Or pack to their old playfellows: there, I take it,
They may, 'cum privilegio,' wear away
The lag end of their lewdness and be laugh'd at.

4

I,3,616

Ay, marry,
There will be woe indeed, lords: the sly whoresons
Have got a speeding trick to lay down ladies;
A French song and a fiddle has no fellow.

5

I,3,632

To the cardinal's:
Your lordship is a guest too.

6

I,3,638

That churchman bears a bounteous mind indeed,
A hand as fruitful as the land that feeds us;
His dews fall every where.

7

I,4,675

O, that your lordship were but now confessor
To one or two of these!

8

I,4,679

Faith, how easy?

9

I,4,801

Yes, my lord.

10

II,1,913

I do beseech your grace, for charity,
If ever any malice in your heart
Were hid against me, now to forgive me frankly.

11

II,1,930

To the water side I must conduct your grace;
Then give my charge up to Sir Nicholas Vaux,
Who undertakes you to your end.

12

V,1,2784

Came you from the king, my lord

13

V,1,2787

I must to him too,
Before he go to bed. I'll take my leave.

14

V,1,2796

My lord, I love you;
And durst commend a secret to your ear
Much weightier than this work. The queen's in labour,
They say, in great extremity; and fear'd
She'll with the labour end.

15

V,1,2805

Methinks I could
Cry the amen; and yet my conscience says
She's a good creature, and, sweet lady, does
Deserve our better wishes.

16

V,1,2816

Now, sir, you speak of two
The most remark'd i' the kingdom. As for Cromwell,
Beside that of the jewel house, is made master
O' the rolls, and the king's secretary; further, sir,
Stands in the gap and trade of moe preferments,
With which the time will load him. The archbishop
Is the king's hand and tongue; and who dare speak
One syllable against him?

17

V,1,2840

Many good nights, my lord: I rest your servant.

18

V,1,2849

I could not personally deliver to her
What you commanded me, but by her woman
I sent your message; who return'd her thanks
In the great'st humbleness, and desired your highness
Most heartily to pray for her.

19

V,1,2856

So said her woman; and that her sufferance made
Almost each pang a death.

20

V,1,2881

[Aside] This is about that which the bishop spake:
I am happily come hither.

21

V,1,2988

Sir?

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