Speeches (Lines) for Julia
in "Two Gentlemen of Verona"

Total: 107

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,151

But say, Lucetta, now we are alone,
Wouldst thou then counsel me to fall in love?

2

I,2,154

Of all the fair resort of gentlemen
That every day with parle encounter me,...

3

I,2,159

What think'st thou of the fair Sir Eglamour?

4

I,2,162

What think'st thou of the rich Mercatio?

5

I,2,164

What think'st thou of the gentle Proteus?

6

I,2,166

How now! what means this passion at his name?

7

I,2,170

Why not on Proteus, as of all the rest?

8

I,2,172

Your reason?

9

I,2,175

And wouldst thou have me cast my love on him?

10

I,2,177

Why he, of all the rest, hath never moved me.

11

I,2,179

His little speaking shows his love but small.

12

I,2,181

They do not love that do not show their love.

13

I,2,183

I would I knew his mind.

14

I,2,185

'To Julia.' Say, from whom?

15

I,2,187

Say, say, who gave it thee?

16

I,2,192

Now, by my modesty, a goodly broker!
Dare you presume to harbour wanton lines?...

17

I,2,199

Will ye be gone?

18

I,2,202

And yet I would I had o'erlooked the letter:
It were a shame to call her back again...

19

I,2,221

Is't near dinner-time?

20

I,2,225

What is't that you took up so gingerly?

21

I,2,227

Why didst thou stoop, then?

22

I,2,229

And is that paper nothing?

23

I,2,231

Then let it lie for those that it concerns.

24

I,2,234

Some love of yours hath writ to you in rhyme.

25

I,2,237

As little by such toys as may be possible.
Best sing it to the tune of 'Light o' love.'

26

I,2,240

Heavy! belike it hath some burden then?

27

I,2,242

And why not you?

28

I,2,244

Let's see your song. How now, minion!

29

I,2,247

You do not?

30

I,2,249

You, minion, are too saucy.

31

I,2,253

The mean is drown'd with your unruly bass.

32

I,2,255

This babble shall not henceforth trouble me.
Here is a coil with protestation!...

33

I,2,263

Nay, would I were so anger'd with the same!
O hateful hands, to tear such loving words!...

34

I,2,292

Well, let us go.

35

I,2,294

If you respect them, best to take them up.

36

I,2,297

I see you have a month's mind to them.

37

I,2,300

Come, come; will't please you go?

38

II,2,567

I must, where is no remedy.

39

II,2,569

If you turn not, you will return the sooner.
Keep this remembrance for thy Julia's sake.

40

II,2,573

And seal the bargain with a holy kiss.

41

II,7,976

Counsel, Lucetta; gentle girl, assist me;
And even in kind love I do conjure thee,...

42

II,7,984

A true-devoted pilgrim is not weary
To measure kingdoms with his feeble steps;...

43

II,7,990

O, know'st thou not his looks are my soul's food?
Pity the dearth that I have pined in,...

44

II,7,999

The more thou damm'st it up, the more it burns.
The current that with gentle murmur glides,...

45

II,7,1015

Not like a woman; for I would prevent
The loose encounters of lascivious men:...

46

II,7,1020

No, girl, I'll knit it up in silken strings
With twenty odd-conceited true-love knots....

47

II,7,1025

That fits as well as 'Tell me, good my lord,
What compass will you wear your farthingale?'...

48

II,7,1029

Out, out, Lucetta! that would be ill-favour'd.

49

II,7,1032

Lucetta, as thou lovest me, let me have
What thou thinkest meet and is most mannerly....

50

II,7,1038

Nay, that I will not.

51

II,7,1043

That is the least, Lucetta, of my fear:
A thousand oaths, an ocean of his tears...

52

II,7,1048

Base men, that use them to so base effect!
But truer stars did govern Proteus' birth...

53

II,7,1055

Now, as thou lovest me, do him not that wrong
To bear a hard opinion of his truth:...

54

IV,2,1661

Marry, mine host, because I cannot be merry.

55

IV,2,1664

But shall I hear him speak?

56

IV,2,1666

That will be music.

57

IV,2,1669

Is he among these?

58

IV,2,1689

You mistake; the musician likes me not.

59

IV,2,1691

He plays false, father.

60

IV,2,1693

Not so; but yet so false that he grieves my very
heart-strings.

61

IV,2,1696

Ay, I would I were deaf; it makes me have a slow heart.

62

IV,2,1698

Not a whit, when it jars so.

63

IV,2,1700

Ay, that change is the spite.

64

IV,2,1702

I would always have one play but one thing.
But, host, doth this Sir Proteus that we talk on...

65

IV,2,1707

Where is Launce?

66

IV,2,1710

Peace! stand aside: the company parts.

67

IV,2,1741

[Aside] 'Twere false, if I should speak it;
For I am sure she is not buried.

68

IV,2,1753

[Aside] He heard not that.

69

IV,2,1761

[Aside] If 'twere a substance, you would, sure,
deceive it,...

70

IV,2,1772

Host, will you go?

71

IV,2,1774

Pray you, where lies Sir Proteus?

72

IV,2,1777

Not so; but it hath been the longest night
That e'er I watch'd and the most heaviest.

73

IV,4,1876

In what you please: I'll do what I can.

74

IV,4,1909

It seems you loved not her, to leave her token.
She is dead, belike?

75

IV,4,1912

Alas!

76

IV,4,1914

I cannot choose
But pity her.

77

IV,4,1917

Because methinks that she loved you as well
As you do love your lady Silvia:...

78

IV,4,1929

How many women would do such a message?
Alas, poor Proteus! thou hast entertain'd...

79

IV,4,1951

If you be she, I do entreat your patience
To hear me speak the message I am sent on.

80

IV,4,1954

From my master, Sir Proteus, madam.

81

IV,4,1956

Ay, madam.

82

IV,4,1961

Madam, please you peruse this letter.—
Pardon me, madam; I have unadvised...

83

IV,4,1966

It may not be; good madam, pardon me.

84

IV,4,1972

Madam, he sends your ladyship this ring.

85

IV,4,1978

She thanks you.

86

IV,4,1980

I thank you, madam, that you tender her.
Poor gentlewoman! my master wrongs her much.

87

IV,4,1983

Almost as well as I do know myself:
To think upon her woes I do protest...

88

IV,4,1987

I think she doth; and that's her cause of sorrow.

89

IV,4,1989

She hath been fairer, madam, than she is:
When she did think my master loved her well,...

90

IV,4,1998

About my stature; for at Pentecost,
When all our pageants of delight were play'd,...

91

IV,4,2020

And she shall thank you for't, if e'er you know her.
A virtuous gentlewoman, mild and beautiful...

92

V,2,2071

[Aside] But love will not be spurr'd to what
it loathes.

93

V,2,2078

[Aside] 'Tis true; such pearls as put out
ladies' eyes;...

94

V,2,2084

[Aside] But better, indeed, when you hold your peace.

95

V,2,2087

[Aside] She needs not, when she knows it cowardice.

96

V,2,2090

[Aside] True; from a gentleman to a fool.

97

V,2,2094

[Aside] That such an ass should owe them.

98

V,2,2096

Here comes the duke.

99

V,2,2128

And I will follow, more to cross that love
Than hate for Silvia that is gone for love.

100

V,4,2181

[Aside] And me, when he approacheth to your presence.

101

V,4,2238

O me unhappy!

102

V,4,2243

O good sir, my master charged me to deliver a ring
to Madam Silvia, which, out of my neglect, was never done.

103

V,4,2246

Here 'tis; this is it.

104

V,4,2249

O, cry you mercy, sir, I have mistook:
This is the ring you sent to Silvia.

105

V,4,2253

And Julia herself did give it me;
And Julia herself hath brought it hither.

106

V,4,2256

Behold her that gave aim to all thy oaths,
And entertain'd 'em deeply in her heart....

107

V,4,2276

And I mine.

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