Speeches (Lines) for Julia
in "Two Gentlemen of Verona"

Total: 107

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,151

But say, Lucetta, now we are alone,
Wouldst thou then counsel me to fall in love?

2

I,2,154

Of all the fair resort of gentlemen
That every day with parle encounter me,
In thy opinion which is worthiest love?

3

I,2,159

What think'st thou of the fair Sir Eglamour?

4

I,2,162

What think'st thou of the rich Mercatio?

5

I,2,164

What think'st thou of the gentle Proteus?

6

I,2,166

How now! what means this passion at his name?

7

I,2,170

Why not on Proteus, as of all the rest?

8

I,2,172

Your reason?

9

I,2,175

And wouldst thou have me cast my love on him?

10

I,2,177

Why he, of all the rest, hath never moved me.

11

I,2,179

His little speaking shows his love but small.

12

I,2,181

They do not love that do not show their love.

13

I,2,183

I would I knew his mind.

14

I,2,185

'To Julia.' Say, from whom?

15

I,2,187

Say, say, who gave it thee?

16

I,2,192

Now, by my modesty, a goodly broker!
Dare you presume to harbour wanton lines?
To whisper and conspire against my youth?
Now, trust me, 'tis an office of great worth
And you an officer fit for the place.
Or else return no more into my sight.

17

I,2,199

Will ye be gone?

18

I,2,202

And yet I would I had o'erlooked the letter:
It were a shame to call her back again
And pray her to a fault for which I chid her.
What a fool is she, that knows I am a maid,
And would not force the letter to my view!
Since maids, in modesty, say 'no' to that
Which they would have the profferer construe 'ay.'
Fie, fie, how wayward is this foolish love
That, like a testy babe, will scratch the nurse
And presently all humbled kiss the rod!
How churlishly I chid Lucetta hence,
When willingly I would have had her here!
How angerly I taught my brow to frown,
When inward joy enforced my heart to smile!
My penance is to call Lucetta back
And ask remission for my folly past.
What ho! Lucetta!

19

I,2,221

Is't near dinner-time?

20

I,2,225

What is't that you took up so gingerly?

21

I,2,227

Why didst thou stoop, then?

22

I,2,229

And is that paper nothing?

23

I,2,231

Then let it lie for those that it concerns.

24

I,2,234

Some love of yours hath writ to you in rhyme.

25

I,2,237

As little by such toys as may be possible.
Best sing it to the tune of 'Light o' love.'

26

I,2,240

Heavy! belike it hath some burden then?

27

I,2,242

And why not you?

28

I,2,244

Let's see your song. How now, minion!

29

I,2,247

You do not?

30

I,2,249

You, minion, are too saucy.

31

I,2,253

The mean is drown'd with your unruly bass.

32

I,2,255

This babble shall not henceforth trouble me.
Here is a coil with protestation!
[Tears the letter]
Go get you gone, and let the papers lie:
You would be fingering them, to anger me.

33

I,2,263

Nay, would I were so anger'd with the same!
O hateful hands, to tear such loving words!
Injurious wasps, to feed on such sweet honey
And kill the bees that yield it with your stings!
I'll kiss each several paper for amends.
Look, here is writ 'kind Julia.' Unkind Julia!
As in revenge of thy ingratitude,
I throw thy name against the bruising stones,
Trampling contemptuously on thy disdain.
And here is writ 'love-wounded Proteus.'
Poor wounded name! my bosom as a bed
Shall lodge thee till thy wound be thoroughly heal'd;
And thus I search it with a sovereign kiss.
But twice or thrice was 'Proteus' written down.
Be calm, good wind, blow not a word away
Till I have found each letter in the letter,
Except mine own name: that some whirlwind bear
Unto a ragged fearful-hanging rock
And throw it thence into the raging sea!
Lo, here in one line is his name twice writ,
'Poor forlorn Proteus, passionate Proteus,
To the sweet Julia:' that I'll tear away.
And yet I will not, sith so prettily
He couples it to his complaining names.
Thus will I fold them one on another:
Now kiss, embrace, contend, do what you will.

34

I,2,292

Well, let us go.

35

I,2,294

If you respect them, best to take them up.

36

I,2,297

I see you have a month's mind to them.

37

I,2,300

Come, come; will't please you go?

38

II,2,567

I must, where is no remedy.

39

II,2,569

If you turn not, you will return the sooner.
Keep this remembrance for thy Julia's sake.

40

II,2,573

And seal the bargain with a holy kiss.

41

II,7,976

Counsel, Lucetta; gentle girl, assist me;
And even in kind love I do conjure thee,
Who art the table wherein all my thoughts
Are visibly character'd and engraved,
To lesson me and tell me some good mean
How, with my honour, I may undertake
A journey to my loving Proteus.

42

II,7,984

A true-devoted pilgrim is not weary
To measure kingdoms with his feeble steps;
Much less shall she that hath Love's wings to fly,
And when the flight is made to one so dear,
Of such divine perfection, as Sir Proteus.

43

II,7,990

O, know'st thou not his looks are my soul's food?
Pity the dearth that I have pined in,
By longing for that food so long a time.
Didst thou but know the inly touch of love,
Thou wouldst as soon go kindle fire with snow
As seek to quench the fire of love with words.

44

II,7,999

The more thou damm'st it up, the more it burns.
The current that with gentle murmur glides,
Thou know'st, being stopp'd, impatiently doth rage;
But when his fair course is not hindered,
He makes sweet music with the enamell'ed stones,
Giving a gentle kiss to every sedge
He overtaketh in his pilgrimage,
And so by many winding nooks he strays
With willing sport to the wild ocean.
Then let me go and hinder not my course
I'll be as patient as a gentle stream
And make a pastime of each weary step,
Till the last step have brought me to my love;
And there I'll rest, as after much turmoil
A blessed soul doth in Elysium.

45

II,7,1015

Not like a woman; for I would prevent
The loose encounters of lascivious men:
Gentle Lucetta, fit me with such weeds
As may beseem some well-reputed page.

46

II,7,1020

No, girl, I'll knit it up in silken strings
With twenty odd-conceited true-love knots.
To be fantastic may become a youth
Of greater time than I shall show to be.

47

II,7,1025

That fits as well as 'Tell me, good my lord,
What compass will you wear your farthingale?'
Why even what fashion thou best likest, Lucetta.

48

II,7,1029

Out, out, Lucetta! that would be ill-favour'd.

49

II,7,1032

Lucetta, as thou lovest me, let me have
What thou thinkest meet and is most mannerly.
But tell me, wench, how will the world repute me
For undertaking so unstaid a journey?
I fear me, it will make me scandalized.

50

II,7,1038

Nay, that I will not.

51

II,7,1043

That is the least, Lucetta, of my fear:
A thousand oaths, an ocean of his tears
And instances of infinite of love
Warrant me welcome to my Proteus.

52

II,7,1048

Base men, that use them to so base effect!
But truer stars did govern Proteus' birth
His words are bonds, his oaths are oracles,
His love sincere, his thoughts immaculate,
His tears pure messengers sent from his heart,
His heart as far from fraud as heaven from earth.

53

II,7,1055

Now, as thou lovest me, do him not that wrong
To bear a hard opinion of his truth:
Only deserve my love by loving him;
And presently go with me to my chamber,
To take a note of what I stand in need of,
To furnish me upon my longing journey.
All that is mine I leave at thy dispose,
My goods, my lands, my reputation;
Only, in lieu thereof, dispatch me hence.
Come, answer not, but to it presently!
I am impatient of my tarriance.

54

IV,2,1661

Marry, mine host, because I cannot be merry.

55

IV,2,1664

But shall I hear him speak?

56

IV,2,1666

That will be music.

57

IV,2,1669

Is he among these?

58

IV,2,1689

You mistake; the musician likes me not.

59

IV,2,1691

He plays false, father.

60

IV,2,1693

Not so; but yet so false that he grieves my very
heart-strings.

61

IV,2,1696

Ay, I would I were deaf; it makes me have a slow heart.

62

IV,2,1698

Not a whit, when it jars so.

63

IV,2,1700

Ay, that change is the spite.

64

IV,2,1702

I would always have one play but one thing.
But, host, doth this Sir Proteus that we talk on
Often resort unto this gentlewoman?

65

IV,2,1707

Where is Launce?

66

IV,2,1710

Peace! stand aside: the company parts.

67

IV,2,1741

[Aside] 'Twere false, if I should speak it;
For I am sure she is not buried.

68

IV,2,1753

[Aside] He heard not that.

69

IV,2,1761

[Aside] If 'twere a substance, you would, sure,
deceive it,
And make it but a shadow, as I am.

70

IV,2,1772

Host, will you go?

71

IV,2,1774

Pray you, where lies Sir Proteus?

72

IV,2,1777

Not so; but it hath been the longest night
That e'er I watch'd and the most heaviest.

73

IV,4,1876

In what you please: I'll do what I can.

74

IV,4,1909

It seems you loved not her, to leave her token.
She is dead, belike?

75

IV,4,1912

Alas!

76

IV,4,1914

I cannot choose
But pity her.

77

IV,4,1917

Because methinks that she loved you as well
As you do love your lady Silvia:
She dreams of him that has forgot her love;
You dote on her that cares not for your love.
'Tis pity love should be so contrary;
And thinking of it makes me cry 'alas!'

78

IV,4,1929

How many women would do such a message?
Alas, poor Proteus! thou hast entertain'd
A fox to be the shepherd of thy lambs.
Alas, poor fool! why do I pity him
That with his very heart despiseth me?
Because he loves her, he despiseth me;
Because I love him I must pity him.
This ring I gave him when he parted from me,
To bind him to remember my good will;
And now am I, unhappy messenger,
To plead for that which I would not obtain,
To carry that which I would have refused,
To praise his faith which I would have dispraised.
I am my master's true-confirmed love;
But cannot be true servant to my master,
Unless I prove false traitor to myself.
Yet will I woo for him, but yet so coldly
As, heaven it knows, I would not have him speed.
[Enter SILVIA, attended]
Gentlewoman, good day! I pray you, be my mean
To bring me where to speak with Madam Silvia.

79

IV,4,1951

If you be she, I do entreat your patience
To hear me speak the message I am sent on.

80

IV,4,1954

From my master, Sir Proteus, madam.

81

IV,4,1956

Ay, madam.

82

IV,4,1961

Madam, please you peruse this letter.—
Pardon me, madam; I have unadvised
Deliver'd you a paper that I should not:
This is the letter to your ladyship.

83

IV,4,1966

It may not be; good madam, pardon me.

84

IV,4,1972

Madam, he sends your ladyship this ring.

85

IV,4,1978

She thanks you.

86

IV,4,1980

I thank you, madam, that you tender her.
Poor gentlewoman! my master wrongs her much.

87

IV,4,1983

Almost as well as I do know myself:
To think upon her woes I do protest
That I have wept a hundred several times.

88

IV,4,1987

I think she doth; and that's her cause of sorrow.

89

IV,4,1989

She hath been fairer, madam, than she is:
When she did think my master loved her well,
She, in my judgment, was as fair as you:
But since she did neglect her looking-glass
And threw her sun-expelling mask away,
The air hath starved the roses in her cheeks
And pinch'd the lily-tincture of her face,
That now she is become as black as I.

90

IV,4,1998

About my stature; for at Pentecost,
When all our pageants of delight were play'd,
Our youth got me to play the woman's part,
And I was trimm'd in Madam Julia's gown,
Which served me as fit, by all men's judgments,
As if the garment had been made for me:
Therefore I know she is about my height.
And at that time I made her weep agood,
For I did play a lamentable part:
Madam, 'twas Ariadne passioning
For Theseus' perjury and unjust flight;
Which I so lively acted with my tears
That my poor mistress, moved therewithal,
Wept bitterly; and would I might be dead
If I in thought felt not her very sorrow!

91

IV,4,2020

And she shall thank you for't, if e'er you know her.
A virtuous gentlewoman, mild and beautiful
I hope my master's suit will be but cold,
Since she respects my mistress' love so much.
Alas, how love can trifle with itself!
Here is her picture: let me see; I think,
If I had such a tire, this face of mine
Were full as lovely as is this of hers:
And yet the painter flatter'd her a little,
Unless I flatter with myself too much.
Her hair is auburn, mine is perfect yellow:
If that be all the difference in his love,
I'll get me such a colour'd periwig.
Her eyes are grey as glass, and so are mine:
Ay, but her forehead's low, and mine's as high.
What should it be that he respects in her
But I can make respective in myself,
If this fond Love were not a blinded god?
Come, shadow, come and take this shadow up,
For 'tis thy rival. O thou senseless form,
Thou shalt be worshipp'd, kiss'd, loved and adored!
And, were there sense in his idolatry,
My substance should be statue in thy stead.
I'll use thee kindly for thy mistress' sake,
That used me so; or else, by Jove I vow,
I should have scratch'd out your unseeing eyes
To make my master out of love with thee!

92

V,2,2071

[Aside] But love will not be spurr'd to what
it loathes.

93

V,2,2078

[Aside] 'Tis true; such pearls as put out
ladies' eyes;
For I had rather wink than look on them.

94

V,2,2084

[Aside] But better, indeed, when you hold your peace.

95

V,2,2087

[Aside] She needs not, when she knows it cowardice.

96

V,2,2090

[Aside] True; from a gentleman to a fool.

97

V,2,2094

[Aside] That such an ass should owe them.

98

V,2,2096

Here comes the duke.

99

V,2,2128

And I will follow, more to cross that love
Than hate for Silvia that is gone for love.

100

V,4,2181

[Aside] And me, when he approacheth to your presence.

101

V,4,2238

O me unhappy!

102

V,4,2243

O good sir, my master charged me to deliver a ring
to Madam Silvia, which, out of my neglect, was never done.

103

V,4,2246

Here 'tis; this is it.

104

V,4,2249

O, cry you mercy, sir, I have mistook:
This is the ring you sent to Silvia.

105

V,4,2253

And Julia herself did give it me;
And Julia herself hath brought it hither.

106

V,4,2256

Behold her that gave aim to all thy oaths,
And entertain'd 'em deeply in her heart.
How oft hast thou with perjury cleft the root!
O Proteus, let this habit make thee blush!
Be thou ashamed that I have took upon me
Such an immodest raiment, if shame live
In a disguise of love:
It is the lesser blot, modesty finds,
Women to change their shapes than men their minds.

107

V,4,2276

And I mine.

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