Speeches (Lines) for Dumain
in "Love's Labour's Lost"

Total: 54

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,30

Longaville. I am resolved; 'tis but a three years' fast:
The mind shall banquet, though the body pine:
Fat paunches have lean pates, and dainty bits
Make rich the ribs, but bankrupt quite the wits.

Dumain. My loving lord, Dumain is mortified:
The grosser manner of these world's delights
He throws upon the gross world's baser slaves:
To love, to wealth, to pomp, I pine and die;
With all these living in philosophy.


2

I,1,97

Ferdinand. How well he's read, to reason against reading!

Dumain. Proceeded well, to stop all good proceeding!


3

I,1,100

Biron. The spring is near when green geese are a-breeding.

Dumain. How follows that?


4

I,1,102

Biron. Fit in his place and time.

Dumain. In reason nothing.


5

II,1,686

(stage directions). [Retiring]

Dumain. Sir, I pray you, a word: what lady is that same?


6

II,1,688

Boyet. The heir of Alencon, Katharine her name.

Dumain. A gallant lady. Monsieur, fare you well.


7

IV,3,1408

Biron. All hid, all hid; an old infant play.
Like a demigod here sit I in the sky.
And wretched fools' secrets heedfully o'ereye.
More sacks to the mill! O heavens, I have my wish!
[Enter DUMAIN, with a paper]
Dumain transform'd! four woodcocks in a dish!

Dumain. O most divine Kate!


8

IV,3,1410

Biron. O most profane coxcomb!

Dumain. By heaven, the wonder in a mortal eye!


9

IV,3,1412

Biron. By earth, she is not, corporal, there you lie.

Dumain. Her amber hair for foul hath amber quoted.


10

IV,3,1414

Biron. An amber-colour'd raven was well noted.

Dumain. As upright as the cedar.


11

IV,3,1417

Biron. Stoop, I say;
Her shoulder is with child.

Dumain. As fair as day.


12

IV,3,1419

Biron. Ay, as some days; but then no sun must shine.

Dumain. O that I had my wish!


13

IV,3,1423

Biron. Amen, so I had mine: is not that a good word?

Dumain. I would forget her; but a fever she
Reigns in my blood and will remember'd be.


14

IV,3,1427

Biron. A fever in your blood! why, then incision
Would let her out in saucers: sweet misprision!

Dumain. Once more I'll read the ode that I have writ.


15

IV,3,1429

Biron. Once more I'll mark how love can vary wit.

Dumain. [Reads]
On a day—alack the day!—
Love, whose month is ever May,
Spied a blossom passing fair
Playing in the wanton air:
Through the velvet leaves the wind,
All unseen, can passage find;
That the lover, sick to death,
Wish himself the heaven's breath.
Air, quoth he, thy cheeks may blow;
Air, would I might triumph so!
But, alack, my hand is sworn
Ne'er to pluck thee from thy thorn;
Vow, alack, for youth unmeet,
Youth so apt to pluck a sweet!
Do not call it sin in me,
That I am forsworn for thee;
Thou for whom Jove would swear
Juno but an Ethiope were;
And deny himself for Jove,
Turning mortal for thy love.
This will I send, and something else more plain,
That shall express my true love's fasting pain.
O, would the king, Biron, and Longaville,
Were lovers too! Ill, to example ill,
Would from my forehead wipe a perjured note;
For none offend where all alike do dote.


16

IV,3,1542

Longaville. It did move him to passion, and therefore let's hear it.

Dumain. It is Biron's writing, and here is his name.


17

IV,3,1552

Biron. That you three fools lack'd me fool to make up the mess:
He, he, and you, and you, my liege, and I,
Are pick-purses in love, and we deserve to die.
O, dismiss this audience, and I shall tell you more.

Dumain. Now the number is even.


18

IV,3,1610

Biron. Devils soonest tempt, resembling spirits of light.
O, if in black my lady's brows be deck'd,
It mourns that painting and usurping hair
Should ravish doters with a false aspect;
And therefore is she born to make black fair.
Her favour turns the fashion of the days,
For native blood is counted painting now;
And therefore red, that would avoid dispraise,
Paints itself black, to imitate her brow.

Dumain. To look like her are chimney-sweepers black.


19

IV,3,1613

Ferdinand. And Ethiopes of their sweet complexion crack.

Dumain. Dark needs no candles now, for dark is light.


20

IV,3,1620

Ferdinand. No devil will fright thee then so much as she.

Dumain. I never knew man hold vile stuff so dear.


21

IV,3,1624

Biron. O, if the streets were paved with thine eyes,
Her feet were much too dainty for such tread!

Dumain. O, vile! then, as she goes, what upward lies
The street should see as she walk'd overhead.


22

IV,3,1630

Ferdinand. Then leave this chat; and, good Biron, now prove
Our loving lawful, and our faith not torn.

Dumain. Ay, marry, there; some flattery for this evil.


23

IV,3,1633

Longaville. O, some authority how to proceed;
Some tricks, some quillets, how to cheat the devil.

Dumain. Some salve for perjury.


24

V,2,2141

(stage directions). [They converse apart]

Dumain. Will you vouchsafe with me to change a word?


25

V,2,2143

Maria. Name it.

Dumain. Fair lady,—


26

V,2,2146

Maria. Say you so? Fair lord,—
Take that for your fair lady.

Dumain. Please it you,
As much in private, and I'll bid adieu.


27

V,2,2312

Ferdinand. We are descried; they'll mock us now downright.

Dumain. Let us confess and turn it to a jest.


28

V,2,2488

Costard. I Pompey am, Pompey surnamed the Big—

Dumain. The Great.


29

V,2,2538

Holofernes. Great Hercules is presented by this imp,
Whose club kill'd Cerberus, that three-headed canis;
And when he was a babe, a child, a shrimp,
Thus did he strangle serpents in his manus.
Quoniam he seemeth in minority,
Ergo I come with this apology.
Keep some state in thy exit, and vanish.
[MOTH retires]
Judas I am,—

Dumain. A Judas!


30

V,2,2541

Holofernes. Not Iscariot, sir.
Judas I am, ycliped Maccabaeus.

Dumain. Judas Maccabaeus clipt is plain Judas.


31

V,2,2544

Holofernes. Judas I am,—

Dumain. The more shame for you, Judas.


32

V,2,2553

Boyet. A cittern-head.

Dumain. The head of a bodkin.


33

V,2,2557

Boyet. The pommel of Caesar's falchion.

Dumain. The carved-bone face on a flask.


34

V,2,2559

Biron. Saint George's half-cheek in a brooch.

Dumain. Ay, and in a brooch of lead.


35

V,2,2568

Boyet. Therefore, as he is an ass, let him go.
And so adieu, sweet Jude! nay, why dost thou stay?

Dumain. For the latter end of his name.


36

V,2,2576

Biron. Hide thy head, Achilles: here comes Hector in arms.

Dumain. Though my mocks come home by me, I will now be merry.


37

V,2,2581

Longaville. His leg is too big for Hector's.

Dumain. More calf, certain.


38

V,2,2584

Biron. This cannot be Hector.

Dumain. He's a god or a painter; for he makes faces.


39

V,2,2587

Don Adriano de Armado. The armipotent Mars, of lances the almighty,
Gave Hector a gift,—

Dumain. A gilt nutmeg.


40

V,2,2590

Longaville. Stuck with cloves.

Dumain. No, cloven.


41

V,2,2597

Don Adriano de Armado. Peace!—
The armipotent Mars, of lances the almighty
Gave Hector a gift, the heir of Ilion;
A man so breathed, that certain he would fight; yea
From morn till night, out of his pavilion.
I am that flower,—

Dumain. That mint.


42

V,2,2601

Longaville. I must rather give it the rein, for it runs against Hector.

Dumain. Ay, and Hector's a greyhound.


43

V,2,2610

Boyet. [Aside to DUMAIN] Loves her by the foot,—

Dumain. [Aside to BOYET] He may not by the yard.


44

V,2,2623

Costard. Then shall Hector be whipped for Jaquenetta that is
quick by him and hanged for Pompey that is dead by
him.

Dumain. Most rare Pompey!


45

V,2,2627

Biron. Greater than great, great, great, great Pompey!
Pompey the Huge!

Dumain. Hector trembles.


46

V,2,2630

Biron. Pompey is moved. More Ates, more Ates! stir them
on! stir them on!

Dumain. Hector will challenge him.


47

V,2,2637

Costard. I will not fight with a pole, like a northern man:
I'll slash; I'll do it by the sword. I bepray you,
let me borrow my arms again.

Dumain. Room for the incensed Worthies!


48

V,2,2639

Costard. I'll do it in my shirt.

Dumain. Most resolute Pompey!


49

V,2,2645

Don Adriano de Armado. Gentlemen and soldiers, pardon me; I will not combat
in my shirt.

Dumain. You may not deny it: Pompey hath made the challenge.


50

V,2,2725

Princess of France. We have received your letters full of love;
Your favours, the ambassadors of love;
And, in our maiden council, rated them
At courtship, pleasant jest and courtesy,
As bombast and as lining to the time:
But more devout than this in our respects
Have we not been; and therefore met your loves
In their own fashion, like a merriment.

Dumain. Our letters, madam, show'd much more than jest.


51

V,2,2765

Rosaline. You must be purged too, your sins are rack'd,
You are attaint with faults and perjury:
Therefore if you my favour mean to get,
A twelvemonth shall you spend, and never rest,
But seek the weary beds of people sick]

Dumain. But what to me, my love? but what to me? A wife?


52

V,2,2768

Katharine. A beard, fair health, and honesty;
With three-fold love I wish you all these three.

Dumain. O, shall I say, I thank you, gentle wife?


53

V,2,2773

Katharine. Not so, my lord; a twelvemonth and a day
I'll mark no words that smooth-faced wooers say:
Come when the king doth to my lady come;
Then, if I have much love, I'll give you some.

Dumain. I'll serve thee true and faithfully till then.


54

V,2,2826

Princess of France. Was not that Hector?

Dumain. The worthy knight of Troy.


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