Speeches (Lines) for Dumain
in "Love's Labour's Lost"

Total: 54

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,30

My loving lord, Dumain is mortified:
The grosser manner of these world's delights...

2

I,1,97

Proceeded well, to stop all good proceeding!

3

I,1,100

How follows that?

4

I,1,102

In reason nothing.

5

II,1,686

Sir, I pray you, a word: what lady is that same?

6

II,1,688

A gallant lady. Monsieur, fare you well.

7

IV,3,1408

O most divine Kate!

8

IV,3,1410

By heaven, the wonder in a mortal eye!

9

IV,3,1412

Her amber hair for foul hath amber quoted.

10

IV,3,1414

As upright as the cedar.

11

IV,3,1417

As fair as day.

12

IV,3,1419

O that I had my wish!

13

IV,3,1423

I would forget her; but a fever she
Reigns in my blood and will remember'd be.

14

IV,3,1427

Once more I'll read the ode that I have writ.

15

IV,3,1429

[Reads]
On a day—alack the day!—...

16

IV,3,1542

It is Biron's writing, and here is his name.

17

IV,3,1552

Now the number is even.

18

IV,3,1610

To look like her are chimney-sweepers black.

19

IV,3,1613

Dark needs no candles now, for dark is light.

20

IV,3,1620

I never knew man hold vile stuff so dear.

21

IV,3,1624

O, vile! then, as she goes, what upward lies
The street should see as she walk'd overhead.

22

IV,3,1630

Ay, marry, there; some flattery for this evil.

23

IV,3,1633

Some salve for perjury.

24

V,2,2141

Will you vouchsafe with me to change a word?

25

V,2,2143

Fair lady,—

26

V,2,2146

Please it you,
As much in private, and I'll bid adieu.

27

V,2,2312

Let us confess and turn it to a jest.

28

V,2,2488

The Great.

29

V,2,2538

A Judas!

30

V,2,2541

Judas Maccabaeus clipt is plain Judas.

31

V,2,2544

The more shame for you, Judas.

32

V,2,2553

The head of a bodkin.

33

V,2,2557

The carved-bone face on a flask.

34

V,2,2559

Ay, and in a brooch of lead.

35

V,2,2568

For the latter end of his name.

36

V,2,2576

Though my mocks come home by me, I will now be merry.

37

V,2,2581

More calf, certain.

38

V,2,2584

He's a god or a painter; for he makes faces.

39

V,2,2587

A gilt nutmeg.

40

V,2,2590

No, cloven.

41

V,2,2597

That mint.

42

V,2,2601

Ay, and Hector's a greyhound.

43

V,2,2610

[Aside to BOYET] He may not by the yard.

44

V,2,2623

Most rare Pompey!

45

V,2,2627

Hector trembles.

46

V,2,2630

Hector will challenge him.

47

V,2,2637

Room for the incensed Worthies!

48

V,2,2639

Most resolute Pompey!

49

V,2,2645

You may not deny it: Pompey hath made the challenge.

50

V,2,2725

Our letters, madam, show'd much more than jest.

51

V,2,2765

But what to me, my love? but what to me? A wife?

52

V,2,2768

O, shall I say, I thank you, gentle wife?

53

V,2,2773

I'll serve thee true and faithfully till then.

54

V,2,2826

The worthy knight of Troy.

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