Speeches (Lines) for Constable of France
in "Henry V"

Total: 40

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,4,927

O peace, Prince Dauphin!
You are too much mistaken in this king:
Question your grace the late ambassadors,
With what great state he heard their embassy,
How well supplied with noble counsellors,
How modest in exception, and withal
How terrible in constant resolution,
And you shall find his vanities forespent
Were but the outside of the Roman Brutus,
Covering discretion with a coat of folly;
As gardeners do with ordure hide those roots
That shall first spring and be most delicate.

2

III,5,1392

And if he be not fought withal, my lord,
Let us not live in France; let us quit all
And give our vineyards to a barbarous people.

3

III,5,1405

Dieu de batailles! where have they this mettle?
Is not their climate foggy, raw and dull,
On whom, as in despite, the sun looks pale,
Killing their fruit with frowns? Can sodden water,
A drench for sur-rein'd jades, their barley-broth,
Decoct their cold blood to such valiant heat?
And shall our quick blood, spirited with wine,
Seem frosty? O, for honour of our land,
Let us not hang like roping icicles
Upon our houses' thatch, whiles a more frosty people
Sweat drops of gallant youth in our rich fields!
Poor we may call them in their native lords.

4

III,5,1446

This becomes the great.
Sorry am I his numbers are so few,
His soldiers sick and famish'd in their march,
For I am sure, when he shall see our army,
He'll drop his heart into the sink of fear
And for achievement offer us his ransom.

5

III,7,1644

Tut! I have the best armour of the world. Would it were day!

6

III,7,1646

It is the best horse of Europe.

7

III,7,1666

Indeed, my lord, it is a most absolute and excellent horse.

8

III,7,1687

Nay, for methought yesterday your mistress shrewdly
shook your back.

9

III,7,1690

Mine was not bridled.

10

III,7,1694

You have good judgment in horsemanship.

11

III,7,1698

I had as lief have my mistress a jade.

12

III,7,1700

I could make as true a boast as that, if I had a sow
to my mistress.

13

III,7,1704

Yet do I not use my horse for my mistress, or any
such proverb so little kin to the purpose.

14

III,7,1708

Stars, my lord.

15

III,7,1710

And yet my sky shall not want.

16

III,7,1713

Even as your horse bears your praises; who would
trot as well, were some of your brags dismounted.

17

III,7,1718

I will not say so, for fear I should be faced out of
my way: but I would it were morning; for I would
fain be about the ears of the English.

18

III,7,1722

You must first go yourself to hazard, ere you have them.

19

III,7,1727

I think he will eat all he kills.

20

III,7,1729

Swear by her foot, that she may tread out the oath.

21

III,7,1731

Doing is activity; and he will still be doing.

22

III,7,1733

Nor will do none to-morrow: he will keep that good name still.

23

III,7,1735

I was told that by one that knows him better than
you.

24

III,7,1738

Marry, he told me so himself; and he said he cared
not who knew it

25

III,7,1741

By my faith, sir, but it is; never any body saw it
but his lackey: 'tis a hooded valour; and when it
appears, it will bate.

26

III,7,1745

I will cap that proverb with 'There is flattery in friendship.'

27

III,7,1747

Well placed: there stands your friend for the
devil: have at the very eye of that proverb with 'A
pox of the devil.'

28

III,7,1752

You have shot over.

29

III,7,1757

Who hath measured the ground?

30

III,7,1759

A valiant and most expert gentleman. Would it were
day! Alas, poor Harry of England! he longs not for
the dawning as we do.

31

III,7,1765

If the English had any apprehension, they would run away.

32

III,7,1775

Just, just; and the men do sympathize with the
mastiffs in robustious and rough coming on, leaving
their wits with their wives: and then give them
great meals of beef and iron and steel, they will
eat like wolves and fight like devils.

33

III,7,1781

Then shall we find to-morrow they have only stomachs
to eat and none to fight. Now is it time to arm:
come, shall we about it?

34

IV,2,2171

Hark, how our steeds for present service neigh!

35

IV,2,2179

To horse, you gallant princes! straight to horse!
Do but behold yon poor and starved band,
And your fair show shall suck away their souls,
Leaving them but the shales and husks of men.
There is not work enough for all our hands;
Scarce blood enough in all their sickly veins
To give each naked curtle-axe a stain,
That our French gallants shall to-day draw out,
And sheathe for lack of sport: let us but blow on them,
The vapour of our valour will o'erturn them.
'Tis positive 'gainst all exceptions, lords,
That our superfluous lackeys and our peasants,
Who in unnecessary action swarm
About our squares of battle, were enow
To purge this field of such a hilding foe,
Though we upon this mountain's basis by
Took stand for idle speculation:
But that our honours must not. What's to say?
A very little little let us do.
And all is done. Then let the trumpets sound
The tucket sonance and the note to mount;
For our approach shall so much dare the field
That England shall couch down in fear and yield.

36

IV,2,2221

They have said their prayers, and they stay for death.

37

IV,2,2225

I stay but for my guidon: to the field!
I will the banner from a trumpet take,
And use it for my haste. Come, come, away!
The sun is high, and we outwear the day.

38

IV,5,2450

O diable!

39

IV,5,2457

Why, all our ranks are broke.

40

IV,5,2468

Disorder, that hath spoil'd us, friend us now!
Let us on heaps go offer up our lives.

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