Speeches (Lines) for Constable of France
in "Henry V"

Total: 40

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,4,927

O peace, Prince Dauphin!
You are too much mistaken in this king:...

2

III,5,1392

And if he be not fought withal, my lord,
Let us not live in France; let us quit all...

3

III,5,1405

Dieu de batailles! where have they this mettle?
Is not their climate foggy, raw and dull,...

4

III,5,1446

This becomes the great.
Sorry am I his numbers are so few,...

5

III,7,1644

Tut! I have the best armour of the world. Would it were day!

6

III,7,1646

It is the best horse of Europe.

7

III,7,1666

Indeed, my lord, it is a most absolute and excellent horse.

8

III,7,1687

Nay, for methought yesterday your mistress shrewdly
shook your back.

9

III,7,1690

Mine was not bridled.

10

III,7,1694

You have good judgment in horsemanship.

11

III,7,1698

I had as lief have my mistress a jade.

12

III,7,1700

I could make as true a boast as that, if I had a sow
to my mistress.

13

III,7,1704

Yet do I not use my horse for my mistress, or any
such proverb so little kin to the purpose.

14

III,7,1708

Stars, my lord.

15

III,7,1710

And yet my sky shall not want.

16

III,7,1713

Even as your horse bears your praises; who would
trot as well, were some of your brags dismounted.

17

III,7,1718

I will not say so, for fear I should be faced out of
my way: but I would it were morning; for I would...

18

III,7,1722

You must first go yourself to hazard, ere you have them.

19

III,7,1727

I think he will eat all he kills.

20

III,7,1729

Swear by her foot, that she may tread out the oath.

21

III,7,1731

Doing is activity; and he will still be doing.

22

III,7,1733

Nor will do none to-morrow: he will keep that good name still.

23

III,7,1735

I was told that by one that knows him better than
you.

24

III,7,1738

Marry, he told me so himself; and he said he cared
not who knew it

25

III,7,1741

By my faith, sir, but it is; never any body saw it
but his lackey: 'tis a hooded valour; and when it...

26

III,7,1745

I will cap that proverb with 'There is flattery in friendship.'

27

III,7,1747

Well placed: there stands your friend for the
devil: have at the very eye of that proverb with 'A...

28

III,7,1752

You have shot over.

29

III,7,1757

Who hath measured the ground?

30

III,7,1759

A valiant and most expert gentleman. Would it were
day! Alas, poor Harry of England! he longs not for...

31

III,7,1765

If the English had any apprehension, they would run away.

32

III,7,1775

Just, just; and the men do sympathize with the
mastiffs in robustious and rough coming on, leaving...

33

III,7,1781

Then shall we find to-morrow they have only stomachs
to eat and none to fight. Now is it time to arm:...

34

IV,2,2171

Hark, how our steeds for present service neigh!

35

IV,2,2179

To horse, you gallant princes! straight to horse!
Do but behold yon poor and starved band,...

36

IV,2,2221

They have said their prayers, and they stay for death.

37

IV,2,2225

I stay but for my guidon: to the field!
I will the banner from a trumpet take,...

38

IV,5,2450

O diable!

39

IV,5,2457

Why, all our ranks are broke.

40

IV,5,2468

Disorder, that hath spoil'd us, friend us now!
Let us on heaps go offer up our lives.

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