Speeches (Lines) for Bertram
in "All's Well That Ends Well"

Total: 102

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,4

And I in going, madam, weep o'er my father's death
anew: but I must attend his majesty's command, to
whom I am now in ward, evermore in subjection.

2

I,1,31

What is it, my good lord, the king languishes of?

3

I,1,33

I heard not of it before.

4

I,1,56

Madam, I desire your holy wishes.

5

I,1,74

[To HELENA] The best wishes that can be forged in
your thoughts be servants to you! Be comfortable
to my mother, your mistress, and make much of her.

6

I,2,264

My thanks and duty are your majesty's.

7

I,2,290

His good remembrance, sir,
Lies richer in your thoughts than on his tomb;
So in approof lives not his epitaph
As in your royal speech.

8

I,2,315

Some six months since, my lord.

9

I,2,321

Thank your majesty.

10

II,1,623

I am commanded here, and kept a coil with
'Too young' and 'the next year' and 'tis too early.'

11

II,1,626

I shall stay here the forehorse to a smock,
Creaking my shoes on the plain masonry,
Till honour be bought up and no sword worn
But one to dance with! By heaven, I'll steal away.

12

II,1,633

I grow to you, and our parting is a tortured body.

13

II,1,646

Stay: the king.

14

II,1,656

And I will do so.

15

II,3,899

And so 'tis.

16

II,3,1005

My wife, my liege! I shall beseech your highness,
In such a business give me leave to use
The help of mine own eyes.

17

II,3,1010

Yes, my good lord;
But never hope to know why I should marry her.

18

II,3,1013

But follows it, my lord, to bring me down
Must answer for your raising? I know her well:
She had her breeding at my father's charge.
A poor physician's daughter my wife! Disdain
Rather corrupt me ever!

19

II,3,1046

I cannot love her, nor will strive to do't.

20

II,3,1068

Pardon, my gracious lord; for I submit
My fancy to your eyes: when I consider
What great creation and what dole of honour
Flies where you bid it, I find that she, which late
Was in my nobler thoughts most base, is now
The praised of the king; who, so ennobled,
Is as 'twere born so.

21

II,3,1079

I take her hand.

22

II,3,1169

Undone, and forfeited to cares for ever!

23

II,3,1171

Although before the solemn priest I have sworn,
I will not bed her.

24

II,3,1174

O my Parolles, they have married me!
I'll to the Tuscan wars, and never bed her.

25

II,3,1178

There's letters from my mother: what the import is,
I know not yet.

26

II,3,1188

It shall be so: I'll send her to my house,
Acquaint my mother with my hate to her,
And wherefore I am fled; write to the king
That which I durst not speak; his present gift
Shall furnish me to those Italian fields,
Where noble fellows strike: war is no strife
To the dark house and the detested wife.

27

II,3,1196

Go with me to my chamber, and advise me.
I'll send her straight away: to-morrow
I'll to the wars, she to her single sorrow.

28

II,5,1266

Yes, my lord, and of very valiant approof.

29

II,5,1268

And by other warranted testimony.

30

II,5,1270

I do assure you, my lord, he is very great in
knowledge and accordingly valiant.

31

II,5,1283

[Aside to PAROLLES] Is she gone to the king?

32

II,5,1285

Will she away to-night?

33

II,5,1287

I have writ my letters, casketed my treasure,
Given order for our horses; and to-night,
When I should take possession of the bride,
End ere I do begin.

34

II,5,1295

Is there any unkindness between my lord and you, monsieur?

35

II,5,1302

It may be you have mistaken him, my lord.

36

II,5,1313

I think so.

37

II,5,1315

Yes, I do know him well, and common speech
Gives him a worthy pass. Here comes my clog.

38

II,5,1322

I shall obey his will.
You must not marvel, Helen, at my course,
Which holds not colour with the time, nor does
The ministration and required office
On my particular. Prepared I was not
For such a business; therefore am I found
So much unsettled: this drives me to entreat you
That presently you take our way for home;
And rather muse than ask why I entreat you,
For my respects are better than they seem
And my appointments have in them a need
Greater than shows itself at the first view
To you that know them not. This to my mother:
[Giving a letter]
'Twill be two days ere I shall see you, so
I leave you to your wisdom.

39

II,5,1340

Come, come, no more of that.

40

II,5,1345

Let that go:
My haste is very great: farewell; hie home.

41

II,5,1348

Well, what would you say?

42

II,5,1353

What would you have?

43

II,5,1358

I pray you, stay not, but in haste to horse.

44

II,5,1360

Where are my other men, monsieur? Farewell.
[Exit HELENA]
Go thou toward home; where I will never come
Whilst I can shake my sword or hear the drum.
Away, and for our flight.

45

III,3,1546

Sir, it is
A charge too heavy for my strength, but yet
We'll strive to bear it for your worthy sake
To the extreme edge of hazard.

46

III,3,1553

This very day,
Great Mars, I put myself into thy file:
Make me but like my thoughts, and I shall prove
A lover of thy drum, hater of love.

47

III,6,1734

Do you think I am so far deceived in him?

48

III,6,1744

I would I knew in what particular action to try him.

49

III,6,1770

How now, monsieur! this drum sticks sorely in your
disposition.

50

III,6,1780

Well, we cannot greatly condemn our success: some
dishonour we had in the loss of that drum; but it is
not to be recovered.

51

III,6,1784

It might; but it is not now.

52

III,6,1789

Why, if you have a stomach, to't, monsieur: if you
think your mystery in stratagem can bring this
instrument of honour again into his native quarter,
be magnanimous in the enterprise and go on; I will
grace the attempt for a worthy exploit: if you
speed well in it, the duke shall both speak of it.
and extend to you what further becomes his
greatness, even to the utmost syllable of your
worthiness.

53

III,6,1799

But you must not now slumber in it.

54

III,6,1804

May I be bold to acquaint his grace you are gone about it?

55

III,6,1807

I know thou'rt valiant; and, to the possibility of
thy soldiership, will subscribe for thee. Farewell.

56

III,6,1820

Why, do you think he will make no deed at all of
this that so seriously he does address himself unto?

57

III,6,1832

Your brother he shall go along with me.

58

III,6,1835

Now will I lead you to the house, and show you
The lass I spoke of.

59

III,6,1838

That's all the fault: I spoke with her but once
And found her wondrous cold; but I sent to her,
By this same coxcomb that we have i' the wind,
Tokens and letters which she did re-send;
And this is all I have done. She's a fair creature:
Will you go see her?

60

IV,2,2004

They told me that your name was Fontibell.

61

IV,2,2006

Titled goddess;
And worth it, with addition! But, fair soul,
In your fine frame hath love no quality?
If quick fire of youth light not your mind,
You are no maiden, but a monument:
When you are dead, you should be such a one
As you are now, for you are cold and stem;
And now you should be as your mother was
When your sweet self was got.

62

IV,2,2016

So should you be.

63

IV,2,2020

No more o' that;
I prithee, do not strive against my vows:
I was compell'd to her; but I love thee
By love's own sweet constraint, and will for ever
Do thee all rights of service.

64

IV,2,2029

How have I sworn!

65

IV,2,2041

Change it, change it;
Be not so holy-cruel: love is holy;
And my integrity ne'er knew the crafts
That you do charge men with. Stand no more off,
But give thyself unto my sick desires,
Who then recover: say thou art mine, and ever
My love as it begins shall so persever.

66

IV,2,2050

I'll lend it thee, my dear; but have no power
To give it from me.

67

IV,2,2053

It is an honour 'longing to our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors;
Which were the greatest obloquy i' the world
In me to lose.

68

IV,2,2064

Here, take my ring:
My house, mine honour, yea, my life, be thine,
And I'll be bid by thee.

69

IV,2,2079

A heaven on earth I have won by wooing thee.

70

IV,3,2174

I have to-night dispatched sixteen businesses, a
month's length a-piece, by an abstract of success:
I have congied with the duke, done my adieu with his
nearest; buried a wife, mourned for her; writ to my
lady mother I am returning; entertained my convoy;
and between these main parcels of dispatch effected
many nicer needs; the last was the greatest, but
that I have not ended yet.

71

IV,3,2185

I mean, the business is not ended, as fearing to
hear of it hereafter. But shall we have this
dialogue between the fool and the soldier? Come,
bring forth this counterfeit module, he has deceived
me, like a double-meaning prophesier.

72

IV,3,2192

No matter: his heels have deserved it, in usurping
his spurs so long. How does he carry himself?

73

IV,3,2201

Nothing of me, has a'?

74

IV,3,2206

A plague upon him! muffled! he can say nothing of
me: hush, hush!

75

IV,3,2226

All's one to him. What a past-saving slave is this!

76

IV,3,2239

But I con him no thanks for't, in the nature he
delivers it.

77

IV,3,2257

What shall be done to him?

78

IV,3,2276

Nay, by your leave, hold your hands; though I know
his brains are forfeit to the next tile that falls.

79

IV,3,2292

Our interpreter does it well.

80

IV,3,2305

Damnable both-sides rogue!

81

IV,3,2316

He shall be whipped through the army with this rhyme
in's forehead.

82

IV,3,2320

I could endure any thing before but a cat, and now
he's a cat to me.

83

IV,3,2345

For this description of thine honesty? A pox upon
him for me, he's more and more a cat.

84

IV,3,2357

A pox on him, he's a cat still.

85

IV,3,2392

Good morrow, noble captain.

86

V,3,2716

My high-repented blames,
Dear sovereign, pardon to me.

87

V,3,2725

Admiringly, my liege, at first
I stuck my choice upon her, ere my heart
Durst make too bold a herald of my tongue
Where the impression of mine eye infixing,
Contempt his scornful perspective did lend me,
Which warp'd the line of every other favour;
Scorn'd a fair colour, or express'd it stolen;
Extended or contracted all proportions
To a most hideous object: thence it came
That she whom all men praised and whom myself,
Since I have lost, have loved, was in mine eye
The dust that did offend it.

88

V,3,2765

Hers it was not.

89

V,3,2774

My gracious sovereign,
Howe'er it pleases you to take it so,
The ring was never hers.

90

V,3,2781

You are deceived, my lord; she never saw it:
In Florence was it from a casement thrown me,
Wrapp'd in a paper, which contain'd the name
Of her that threw it: noble she was, and thought
I stood engaged: but when I had subscribed
To mine own fortune and inform'd her fully
I could not answer in that course of honour
As she had made the overture, she ceased
In heavy satisfaction and would never
Receive the ring again.

91

V,3,2803

She never saw it.

92

V,3,2817

If you shall prove
This ring was ever hers, you shall as easy
Prove that I husbanded her bed in Florence,
Where yet she never was.

93

V,3,2866

My lord, I neither can nor will deny
But that I know them: do they charge me further?

94

V,3,2869

She's none of mine, my lord.

95

V,3,2879

My lord, this is a fond and desperate creature,
Whom sometime I have laugh'd with: let your highness
Lay a more noble thought upon mine honour
Than for to think that I would sink it here.

96

V,3,2890

She's impudent, my lord,
And was a common gamester to the camp.

97

V,3,2911

What of him?
He's quoted for a most perfidious slave,
With all the spots o' the world tax'd and debosh'd;
Whose nature sickens but to speak a truth.
Am I or that or this for what he'll utter,
That will speak any thing?

98

V,3,2918

I think she has: certain it is I liked her,
And boarded her i' the wanton way of youth:
She knew her distance and did angle for me,
Madding my eagerness with her restraint,
As all impediments in fancy's course
Are motives of more fancy; and, in fine,
Her infinite cunning, with her modern grace,
Subdued me to her rate: she got the ring;
And I had that which any inferior might
At market-price have bought.

99

V,3,2934

I have it not.

100

V,3,2944

My lord, I do confess the ring was hers.

101

V,3,3029

Both, both. O, pardon!

102

V,3,3036

If she, my liege, can make me know this clearly,
I'll love her dearly, ever, ever dearly.

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