Speeches (Lines) for Bertram
in "All's Well That Ends Well"

Total: 102

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,4

Countess. In delivering my son from me, I bury a second husband.

Bertram. And I in going, madam, weep o'er my father's death
anew: but I must attend his majesty's command, to
whom I am now in ward, evermore in subjection.


2

I,1,31

Lafeu. He was excellent indeed, madam: the king very
lately spoke of him admiringly and mourningly: he
was skilful enough to have lived still, if knowledge
could be set up against mortality.

Bertram. What is it, my good lord, the king languishes of?


3

I,1,33

Lafeu. A fistula, my lord.

Bertram. I heard not of it before.


4

I,1,56

Countess. If the living be enemy to the grief, the excess
makes it soon mortal.

Bertram. Madam, I desire your holy wishes.


5

I,1,74

(stage directions). [Exit]

Bertram. [To HELENA] The best wishes that can be forged in
your thoughts be servants to you! Be comfortable
to my mother, your mistress, and make much of her.


6

I,2,264

King of France. Youth, thou bear'st thy father's face;
Frank nature, rather curious than in haste,
Hath well composed thee. Thy father's moral parts
Mayst thou inherit too! Welcome to Paris.

Bertram. My thanks and duty are your majesty's.


7

I,2,290

King of France. I would I had that corporal soundness now,
As when thy father and myself in friendship
First tried our soldiership! He did look far
Into the service of the time and was
Discipled of the bravest: he lasted long;
But on us both did haggish age steal on
And wore us out of act. It much repairs me
To talk of your good father. In his youth
He had the wit which I can well observe
To-day in our young lords; but they may jest
Till their own scorn return to them unnoted
Ere they can hide their levity in honour;
So like a courtier, contempt nor bitterness
Were in his pride or sharpness; if they were,
His equal had awaked them, and his honour,
Clock to itself, knew the true minute when
Exception bid him speak, and at this time
His tongue obey'd his hand: who were below him
He used as creatures of another place
And bow'd his eminent top to their low ranks,
Making them proud of his humility,
In their poor praise he humbled. Such a man
Might be a copy to these younger times;
Which, follow'd well, would demonstrate them now
But goers backward.

Bertram. His good remembrance, sir,
Lies richer in your thoughts than on his tomb;
So in approof lives not his epitaph
As in your royal speech.


8

I,2,315

King of France. I fill a place, I know't. How long is't, count,
Since the physician at your father's died?
He was much famed.

Bertram. Some six months since, my lord.


9

I,2,321

King of France. If he were living, I would try him yet.
Lend me an arm; the rest have worn me out
With several applications; nature and sickness
Debate it at their leisure. Welcome, count;
My son's no dearer.

Bertram. Thank your majesty.


10

II,1,623

Parolles. Most admirable: I have seen those wars.

Bertram. I am commanded here, and kept a coil with
'Too young' and 'the next year' and 'tis too early.'


11

II,1,626

Parolles. An thy mind stand to't, boy, steal away bravely.

Bertram. I shall stay here the forehorse to a smock,
Creaking my shoes on the plain masonry,
Till honour be bought up and no sword worn
But one to dance with! By heaven, I'll steal away.


12

II,1,633

Second Lord. I am your accessary; and so, farewell.

Bertram. I grow to you, and our parting is a tortured body.


13

II,1,646

Parolles. Mars dote on you for his novices! what will ye do?

Bertram. Stay: the king.


14

II,1,656

Parolles. [To BERTRAM] Use a more spacious ceremony to the
noble lords; you have restrained yourself within the
list of too cold an adieu: be more expressive to
them: for they wear themselves in the cap of the
time, there do muster true gait, eat, speak, and
move under the influence of the most received star;
and though the devil lead the measure, such are to
be followed: after them, and take a more dilated farewell.

Bertram. And I will do so.


15

II,3,899

Parolles. Why, 'tis the rarest argument of wonder that hath
shot out in our latter times.

Bertram. And so 'tis.


16

II,3,1005

King of France. Why, then, young Bertram, take her; she's thy wife.

Bertram. My wife, my liege! I shall beseech your highness,
In such a business give me leave to use
The help of mine own eyes.


17

II,3,1010

King of France. Know'st thou not, Bertram,
What she has done for me?

Bertram. Yes, my good lord;
But never hope to know why I should marry her.


18

II,3,1013

King of France. Thou know'st she has raised me from my sickly bed.

Bertram. But follows it, my lord, to bring me down
Must answer for your raising? I know her well:
She had her breeding at my father's charge.
A poor physician's daughter my wife! Disdain
Rather corrupt me ever!


19

II,3,1046

King of France. 'Tis only title thou disdain'st in her, the which
I can build up. Strange is it that our bloods,
Of colour, weight, and heat, pour'd all together,
Would quite confound distinction, yet stand off
In differences so mighty. If she be
All that is virtuous, save what thou dislikest,
A poor physician's daughter, thou dislikest
Of virtue for the name: but do not so:
From lowest place when virtuous things proceed,
The place is dignified by the doer's deed:
Where great additions swell's, and virtue none,
It is a dropsied honour. Good alone
Is good without a name. Vileness is so:
The property by what it is should go,
Not by the title. She is young, wise, fair;
In these to nature she's immediate heir,
And these breed honour: that is honour's scorn,
Which challenges itself as honour's born
And is not like the sire: honours thrive,
When rather from our acts we them derive
Than our foregoers: the mere word's a slave
Debosh'd on every tomb, on every grave
A lying trophy, and as oft is dumb
Where dust and damn'd oblivion is the tomb
Of honour'd bones indeed. What should be said?
If thou canst like this creature as a maid,
I can create the rest: virtue and she
Is her own dower; honour and wealth from me.

Bertram. I cannot love her, nor will strive to do't.


20

II,3,1068

King of France. My honour's at the stake; which to defeat,
I must produce my power. Here, take her hand,
Proud scornful boy, unworthy this good gift;
That dost in vile misprision shackle up
My love and her desert; that canst not dream,
We, poising us in her defective scale,
Shall weigh thee to the beam; that wilt not know,
It is in us to plant thine honour where
We please to have it grow. Cheque thy contempt:
Obey our will, which travails in thy good:
Believe not thy disdain, but presently
Do thine own fortunes that obedient right
Which both thy duty owes and our power claims;
Or I will throw thee from my care for ever
Into the staggers and the careless lapse
Of youth and ignorance; both my revenge and hate
Loosing upon thee, in the name of justice,
Without all terms of pity. Speak; thine answer.

Bertram. Pardon, my gracious lord; for I submit
My fancy to your eyes: when I consider
What great creation and what dole of honour
Flies where you bid it, I find that she, which late
Was in my nobler thoughts most base, is now
The praised of the king; who, so ennobled,
Is as 'twere born so.


21

II,3,1079

King of France. Take her by the hand,
And tell her she is thine: to whom I promise
A counterpoise, if not to thy estate
A balance more replete.

Bertram. I take her hand.


22

II,3,1169

(stage directions). [Re-enter BERTRAM]

Bertram. Undone, and forfeited to cares for ever!


23

II,3,1171

Parolles. What's the matter, sweet-heart?

Bertram. Although before the solemn priest I have sworn,
I will not bed her.


24

II,3,1174

Parolles. What, what, sweet-heart?

Bertram. O my Parolles, they have married me!
I'll to the Tuscan wars, and never bed her.


25

II,3,1178

Parolles. France is a dog-hole, and it no more merits
The tread of a man's foot: to the wars!

Bertram. There's letters from my mother: what the import is,
I know not yet.


26

II,3,1188

Parolles. Ay, that would be known. To the wars, my boy, to the wars!
He wears his honour in a box unseen,
That hugs his kicky-wicky here at home,
Spending his manly marrow in her arms,
Which should sustain the bound and high curvet
Of Mars's fiery steed. To other regions
France is a stable; we that dwell in't jades;
Therefore, to the war!

Bertram. It shall be so: I'll send her to my house,
Acquaint my mother with my hate to her,
And wherefore I am fled; write to the king
That which I durst not speak; his present gift
Shall furnish me to those Italian fields,
Where noble fellows strike: war is no strife
To the dark house and the detested wife.


27

II,3,1196

Parolles. Will this capriccio hold in thee? art sure?

Bertram. Go with me to my chamber, and advise me.
I'll send her straight away: to-morrow
I'll to the wars, she to her single sorrow.


28

II,5,1266

Lafeu. But I hope your lordship thinks not him a soldier.

Bertram. Yes, my lord, and of very valiant approof.


29

II,5,1268

Lafeu. You have it from his own deliverance.

Bertram. And by other warranted testimony.


30

II,5,1270

Lafeu. Then my dial goes not true: I took this lark for a bunting.

Bertram. I do assure you, my lord, he is very great in
knowledge and accordingly valiant.


31

II,5,1283

Lafeu. O, I know him well, I, sir; he, sir, 's a good
workman, a very good tailor.

Bertram. [Aside to PAROLLES] Is she gone to the king?


32

II,5,1285

Parolles. She is.

Bertram. Will she away to-night?


33

II,5,1287

Parolles. As you'll have her.

Bertram. I have writ my letters, casketed my treasure,
Given order for our horses; and to-night,
When I should take possession of the bride,
End ere I do begin.


34

II,5,1295

Lafeu. A good traveller is something at the latter end of a
dinner; but one that lies three thirds and uses a
known truth to pass a thousand nothings with, should
be once heard and thrice beaten. God save you, captain.

Bertram. Is there any unkindness between my lord and you, monsieur?


35

II,5,1302

Lafeu. You have made shift to run into 't, boots and spurs
and all, like him that leaped into the custard; and
out of it you'll run again, rather than suffer
question for your residence.

Bertram. It may be you have mistaken him, my lord.


36

II,5,1313

Parolles. An idle lord. I swear.

Bertram. I think so.


37

II,5,1315

Parolles. Why, do you not know him?

Bertram. Yes, I do know him well, and common speech
Gives him a worthy pass. Here comes my clog.


38

II,5,1322

Helena. I have, sir, as I was commanded from you,
Spoke with the king and have procured his leave
For present parting; only he desires
Some private speech with you.

Bertram. I shall obey his will.
You must not marvel, Helen, at my course,
Which holds not colour with the time, nor does
The ministration and required office
On my particular. Prepared I was not
For such a business; therefore am I found
So much unsettled: this drives me to entreat you
That presently you take our way for home;
And rather muse than ask why I entreat you,
For my respects are better than they seem
And my appointments have in them a need
Greater than shows itself at the first view
To you that know them not. This to my mother:
[Giving a letter]
'Twill be two days ere I shall see you, so
I leave you to your wisdom.


39

II,5,1340

Helena. Sir, I can nothing say,
But that I am your most obedient servant.

Bertram. Come, come, no more of that.


40

II,5,1345

Helena. And ever shall
With true observance seek to eke out that
Wherein toward me my homely stars have fail'd
To equal my great fortune.

Bertram. Let that go:
My haste is very great: farewell; hie home.


41

II,5,1348

Helena. Pray, sir, your pardon.

Bertram. Well, what would you say?


42

II,5,1353

Helena. I am not worthy of the wealth I owe,
Nor dare I say 'tis mine, and yet it is;
But, like a timorous thief, most fain would steal
What law does vouch mine own.

Bertram. What would you have?


43

II,5,1358

Helena. Something; and scarce so much: nothing, indeed.
I would not tell you what I would, my lord:
Faith yes;
Strangers and foes do sunder, and not kiss.

Bertram. I pray you, stay not, but in haste to horse.


44

II,5,1360

Helena. I shall not break your bidding, good my lord.

Bertram. Where are my other men, monsieur? Farewell.
[Exit HELENA]
Go thou toward home; where I will never come
Whilst I can shake my sword or hear the drum.
Away, and for our flight.


45

III,3,1546

Duke of Florence. The general of our horse thou art; and we,
Great in our hope, lay our best love and credence
Upon thy promising fortune.

Bertram. Sir, it is
A charge too heavy for my strength, but yet
We'll strive to bear it for your worthy sake
To the extreme edge of hazard.


46

III,3,1553

Duke of Florence. Then go thou forth;
And fortune play upon thy prosperous helm,
As thy auspicious mistress!

Bertram. This very day,
Great Mars, I put myself into thy file:
Make me but like my thoughts, and I shall prove
A lover of thy drum, hater of love.


47

III,6,1734

Second Lord. On my life, my lord, a bubble.

Bertram. Do you think I am so far deceived in him?


48

III,6,1744

First Lord. It were fit you knew him; lest, reposing too far in
his virtue, which he hath not, he might at some
great and trusty business in a main danger fail you.

Bertram. I would I knew in what particular action to try him.


49

III,6,1770

Second Lord. [Aside to BERTRAM] O, for the love of laughter,
hinder not the honour of his design: let him fetch
off his drum in any hand.

Bertram. How now, monsieur! this drum sticks sorely in your
disposition.


50

III,6,1780

First Lord. That was not to be blamed in the command of the
service: it was a disaster of war that Caesar
himself could not have prevented, if he had been
there to command.

Bertram. Well, we cannot greatly condemn our success: some
dishonour we had in the loss of that drum; but it is
not to be recovered.


51

III,6,1784

Parolles. It might have been recovered.

Bertram. It might; but it is not now.


52

III,6,1789

Parolles. It is to be recovered: but that the merit of
service is seldom attributed to the true and exact
performer, I would have that drum or another, or
'hic jacet.'

Bertram. Why, if you have a stomach, to't, monsieur: if you
think your mystery in stratagem can bring this
instrument of honour again into his native quarter,
be magnanimous in the enterprise and go on; I will
grace the attempt for a worthy exploit: if you
speed well in it, the duke shall both speak of it.
and extend to you what further becomes his
greatness, even to the utmost syllable of your
worthiness.


53

III,6,1799

Parolles. By the hand of a soldier, I will undertake it.

Bertram. But you must not now slumber in it.


54

III,6,1804

Parolles. I'll about it this evening: and I will presently
pen down my dilemmas, encourage myself in my
certainty, put myself into my mortal preparation;
and by midnight look to hear further from me.

Bertram. May I be bold to acquaint his grace you are gone about it?


55

III,6,1807

Parolles. I know not what the success will be, my lord; but
the attempt I vow.

Bertram. I know thou'rt valiant; and, to the possibility of
thy soldiership, will subscribe for thee. Farewell.


56

III,6,1820

First Lord. You do not know him, my lord, as we do: certain it
is that he will steal himself into a man's favour and
for a week escape a great deal of discoveries; but
when you find him out, you have him ever after.

Bertram. Why, do you think he will make no deed at all of
this that so seriously he does address himself unto?


57

III,6,1832

Second Lord. I must go look my twigs: he shall be caught.

Bertram. Your brother he shall go along with me.


58

III,6,1835

(stage directions). [Exit]

Bertram. Now will I lead you to the house, and show you
The lass I spoke of.


59

III,6,1838

First Lord. But you say she's honest.

Bertram. That's all the fault: I spoke with her but once
And found her wondrous cold; but I sent to her,
By this same coxcomb that we have i' the wind,
Tokens and letters which she did re-send;
And this is all I have done. She's a fair creature:
Will you go see her?


60

IV,2,2004

(stage directions). [Enter BERTRAM and DIANA]

Bertram. They told me that your name was Fontibell.


61

IV,2,2006

Diana. No, my good lord, Diana.

Bertram. Titled goddess;
And worth it, with addition! But, fair soul,
In your fine frame hath love no quality?
If quick fire of youth light not your mind,
You are no maiden, but a monument:
When you are dead, you should be such a one
As you are now, for you are cold and stem;
And now you should be as your mother was
When your sweet self was got.


62

IV,2,2016

Diana. She then was honest.

Bertram. So should you be.


63

IV,2,2020

Diana. No:
My mother did but duty; such, my lord,
As you owe to your wife.

Bertram. No more o' that;
I prithee, do not strive against my vows:
I was compell'd to her; but I love thee
By love's own sweet constraint, and will for ever
Do thee all rights of service.


64

IV,2,2029

Diana. Ay, so you serve us
Till we serve you; but when you have our roses,
You barely leave our thorns to prick ourselves
And mock us with our bareness.

Bertram. How have I sworn!


65

IV,2,2041

Diana. 'Tis not the many oaths that makes the truth,
But the plain single vow that is vow'd true.
What is not holy, that we swear not by,
But take the High'st to witness: then, pray you, tell me,
If I should swear by God's great attributes,
I loved you dearly, would you believe my oaths,
When I did love you ill? This has no holding,
To swear by him whom I protest to love,
That I will work against him: therefore your oaths
Are words and poor conditions, but unseal'd,
At least in my opinion.

Bertram. Change it, change it;
Be not so holy-cruel: love is holy;
And my integrity ne'er knew the crafts
That you do charge men with. Stand no more off,
But give thyself unto my sick desires,
Who then recover: say thou art mine, and ever
My love as it begins shall so persever.


66

IV,2,2050

Diana. I see that men make ropes in such a scarre
That we'll forsake ourselves. Give me that ring.

Bertram. I'll lend it thee, my dear; but have no power
To give it from me.


67

IV,2,2053

Diana. Will you not, my lord?

Bertram. It is an honour 'longing to our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors;
Which were the greatest obloquy i' the world
In me to lose.


68

IV,2,2064

Diana. Mine honour's such a ring:
My chastity's the jewel of our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors;
Which were the greatest obloquy i' the world
In me to lose: thus your own proper wisdom
Brings in the champion Honour on my part,
Against your vain assault.

Bertram. Here, take my ring:
My house, mine honour, yea, my life, be thine,
And I'll be bid by thee.


69

IV,2,2079

Diana. When midnight comes, knock at my chamber-window:
I'll order take my mother shall not hear.
Now will I charge you in the band of truth,
When you have conquer'd my yet maiden bed,
Remain there but an hour, nor speak to me:
My reasons are most strong; and you shall know them
When back again this ring shall be deliver'd:
And on your finger in the night I'll put
Another ring, that what in time proceeds
May token to the future our past deeds.
Adieu, till then; then, fail not. You have won
A wife of me, though there my hope be done.

Bertram. A heaven on earth I have won by wooing thee.


70

IV,3,2174

First Lord. They cannot be too sweet for the king's tartness.
Here's his lordship now.
[Enter BERTRAM]
How now, my lord! is't not after midnight?

Bertram. I have to-night dispatched sixteen businesses, a
month's length a-piece, by an abstract of success:
I have congied with the duke, done my adieu with his
nearest; buried a wife, mourned for her; writ to my
lady mother I am returning; entertained my convoy;
and between these main parcels of dispatch effected
many nicer needs; the last was the greatest, but
that I have not ended yet.


71

IV,3,2185

Second Lord. If the business be of any difficulty, and this
morning your departure hence, it requires haste of
your lordship.

Bertram. I mean, the business is not ended, as fearing to
hear of it hereafter. But shall we have this
dialogue between the fool and the soldier? Come,
bring forth this counterfeit module, he has deceived
me, like a double-meaning prophesier.


72

IV,3,2192

Second Lord. Bring him forth: has sat i' the stocks all night,
poor gallant knave.

Bertram. No matter: his heels have deserved it, in usurping
his spurs so long. How does he carry himself?


73

IV,3,2201

Second Lord. I have told your lordship already, the stocks carry
him. But to answer you as you would be understood;
he weeps like a wench that had shed her milk: he
hath confessed himself to Morgan, whom he supposes
to be a friar, from the time of his remembrance to
this very instant disaster of his setting i' the
stocks: and what think you he hath confessed?

Bertram. Nothing of me, has a'?


74

IV,3,2206

(stage directions). [Enter PAROLLES guarded, and First Soldier]

Bertram. A plague upon him! muffled! he can say nothing of
me: hush, hush!


75

IV,3,2226

Parolles. Do: I'll take the sacrament on't, how and which way you will.

Bertram. All's one to him. What a past-saving slave is this!


76

IV,3,2239

First Lord. He's very near the truth in this.

Bertram. But I con him no thanks for't, in the nature he
delivers it.


77

IV,3,2257

Parolles. By my troth, sir, if I were to live this present
hour, I will tell true. Let me see: Spurio, a
hundred and fifty; Sebastian, so many; Corambus, so
many; Jaques, so many; Guiltian, Cosmo, Lodowick,
and Gratii, two hundred and fifty each; mine own
company, Chitopher, Vaumond, Bentii, two hundred and
fifty each: so that the muster-file, rotten and
sound, upon my life, amounts not to fifteen thousand
poll; half of the which dare not shake snow from off
their cassocks, lest they shake themselves to pieces.

Bertram. What shall be done to him?


78

IV,3,2276

Parolles. I know him: a' was a botcher's 'prentice in Paris,
from whence he was whipped for getting the shrieve's
fool with child,—a dumb innocent, that could not
say him nay.

Bertram. Nay, by your leave, hold your hands; though I know
his brains are forfeit to the next tile that falls.


79

IV,3,2292

Parolles. I do not know if it be it or no.

Bertram. Our interpreter does it well.


80

IV,3,2305

Parolles. My meaning in't, I protest, was very honest in the
behalf of the maid; for I knew the young count to be
a dangerous and lascivious boy, who is a whale to
virginity and devours up all the fry it finds.

Bertram. Damnable both-sides rogue!


81

IV,3,2316

First Soldier. [Reads] 'When he swears oaths, bid him drop gold, and take it;
After he scores, he never pays the score:
Half won is match well made; match, and well make it;
He ne'er pays after-debts, take it before;
And say a soldier, Dian, told thee this,
Men are to mell with, boys are not to kiss:
For count of this, the count's a fool, I know it,
Who pays before, but not when he does owe it.
Thine, as he vowed to thee in thine ear,
PAROLLES.'

Bertram. He shall be whipped through the army with this rhyme
in's forehead.


82

IV,3,2320

Second Lord. This is your devoted friend, sir, the manifold
linguist and the armipotent soldier.

Bertram. I could endure any thing before but a cat, and now
he's a cat to me.


83

IV,3,2345

First Lord. I begin to love him for this.

Bertram. For this description of thine honesty? A pox upon
him for me, he's more and more a cat.


84

IV,3,2357

First Lord. He hath out-villained villany so far, that the
rarity redeems him.

Bertram. A pox on him, he's a cat still.


85

IV,3,2392

First Lord. That shall you, and take your leave of all your friends.
[Unblinding him]
So, look about you: know you any here?

Bertram. Good morrow, noble captain.


86

V,3,2716

King of France. I am not a day of season,
For thou mayst see a sunshine and a hail
In me at once: but to the brightest beams
Distracted clouds give way; so stand thou forth;
The time is fair again.

Bertram. My high-repented blames,
Dear sovereign, pardon to me.


87

V,3,2725

King of France. All is whole;
Not one word more of the consumed time.
Let's take the instant by the forward top;
For we are old, and on our quick'st decrees
The inaudible and noiseless foot of Time
Steals ere we can effect them. You remember
The daughter of this lord?

Bertram. Admiringly, my liege, at first
I stuck my choice upon her, ere my heart
Durst make too bold a herald of my tongue
Where the impression of mine eye infixing,
Contempt his scornful perspective did lend me,
Which warp'd the line of every other favour;
Scorn'd a fair colour, or express'd it stolen;
Extended or contracted all proportions
To a most hideous object: thence it came
That she whom all men praised and whom myself,
Since I have lost, have loved, was in mine eye
The dust that did offend it.


88

V,3,2765

Lafeu. Come on, my son, in whom my house's name
Must be digested, give a favour from you
To sparkle in the spirits of my daughter,
That she may quickly come.
[BERTRAM gives a ring]
By my old beard,
And every hair that's on't, Helen, that's dead,
Was a sweet creature: such a ring as this,
The last that e'er I took her at court,
I saw upon her finger.

Bertram. Hers it was not.


89

V,3,2774

King of France. Now, pray you, let me see it; for mine eye,
While I was speaking, oft was fasten'd to't.
This ring was mine; and, when I gave it Helen,
I bade her, if her fortunes ever stood
Necessitied to help, that by this token
I would relieve her. Had you that craft, to reave
her
Of what should stead her most?

Bertram. My gracious sovereign,
Howe'er it pleases you to take it so,
The ring was never hers.


90

V,3,2781

Lafeu. I am sure I saw her wear it.

Bertram. You are deceived, my lord; she never saw it:
In Florence was it from a casement thrown me,
Wrapp'd in a paper, which contain'd the name
Of her that threw it: noble she was, and thought
I stood engaged: but when I had subscribed
To mine own fortune and inform'd her fully
I could not answer in that course of honour
As she had made the overture, she ceased
In heavy satisfaction and would never
Receive the ring again.


91

V,3,2803

King of France. Plutus himself,
That knows the tinct and multiplying medicine,
Hath not in nature's mystery more science
Than I have in this ring: 'twas mine, 'twas Helen's,
Whoever gave it you. Then, if you know
That you are well acquainted with yourself,
Confess 'twas hers, and by what rough enforcement
You got it from her: she call'd the saints to surety
That she would never put it from her finger,
Unless she gave it to yourself in bed,
Where you have never come, or sent it us
Upon her great disaster.

Bertram. She never saw it.


92

V,3,2817

King of France. Thou speak'st it falsely, as I love mine honour;
And makest conjectural fears to come into me
Which I would fain shut out. If it should prove
That thou art so inhuman,—'twill not prove so;—
And yet I know not: thou didst hate her deadly,
And she is dead; which nothing, but to close
Her eyes myself, could win me to believe,
More than to see this ring. Take him away.
[Guards seize BERTRAM]
My fore-past proofs, howe'er the matter fall,
Shall tax my fears of little vanity,
Having vainly fear'd too little. Away with him!
We'll sift this matter further.

Bertram. If you shall prove
This ring was ever hers, you shall as easy
Prove that I husbanded her bed in Florence,
Where yet she never was.


93

V,3,2866

King of France. Come hither, count; do you know these women?

Bertram. My lord, I neither can nor will deny
But that I know them: do they charge me further?


94

V,3,2869

Diana. Why do you look so strange upon your wife?

Bertram. She's none of mine, my lord.


95

V,3,2879

Lafeu. Your reputation comes too short for my daughter; you
are no husband for her.

Bertram. My lord, this is a fond and desperate creature,
Whom sometime I have laugh'd with: let your highness
Lay a more noble thought upon mine honour
Than for to think that I would sink it here.


96

V,3,2890

King of France. What say'st thou to her?

Bertram. She's impudent, my lord,
And was a common gamester to the camp.


97

V,3,2911

(stage directions). [Exit an Attendant]

Bertram. What of him?
He's quoted for a most perfidious slave,
With all the spots o' the world tax'd and debosh'd;
Whose nature sickens but to speak a truth.
Am I or that or this for what he'll utter,
That will speak any thing?


98

V,3,2918

King of France. She hath that ring of yours.

Bertram. I think she has: certain it is I liked her,
And boarded her i' the wanton way of youth:
She knew her distance and did angle for me,
Madding my eagerness with her restraint,
As all impediments in fancy's course
Are motives of more fancy; and, in fine,
Her infinite cunning, with her modern grace,
Subdued me to her rate: she got the ring;
And I had that which any inferior might
At market-price have bought.


99

V,3,2934

Diana. I must be patient:
You, that have turn'd off a first so noble wife,
May justly diet me. I pray you yet;
Since you lack virtue, I will lose a husband;
Send for your ring, I will return it home,
And give me mine again.

Bertram. I have it not.


100

V,3,2944

(stage directions). [Enter PAROLLES]

Bertram. My lord, I do confess the ring was hers.


101

V,3,3029

Helena. No, my good lord;
'Tis but the shadow of a wife you see,
The name and not the thing.

Bertram. Both, both. O, pardon!


102

V,3,3036

Helena. O my good lord, when I was like this maid,
I found you wondrous kind. There is your ring;
And, look you, here's your letter; this it says:
'When from my finger you can get this ring
And are by me with child,' &c. This is done:
Will you be mine, now you are doubly won?

Bertram. If she, my liege, can make me know this clearly,
I'll love her dearly, ever, ever dearly.


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