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'T is a fault to Heaven,
A fault against the dead, a fault to nature,
To reason most absurd.

      — Hamlet, Act I Scene 2

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1-20 of 232 total

KEYWORD: ye

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# Result number

Work The work is either a play, poem, or sonnet. The sonnets are treated as single work with 154 parts.

Character Indicates who said the line. If it's a play or sonnet, the character name is "Poet."

Line Shows where the line falls within the work.

The numbering is not keyed to any copyrighted numbering system found in a volume of collected works (Arden, Oxford, etc.) The numbering starts at the beginning of the work, and does not restart for each scene.

Text The line's full text, with keywords highlighted within it, unless highlighting has been disabled by the user.

1

All's Well That Ends Well
[II, 1]

Parolles

645

Mars dote on you for his novices! what will ye do?

2

All's Well That Ends Well
[IV, 3]

Parolles

2211

I will confess what I know without constraint: if
ye pinch me like a pasty, I can say no more.

3

All's Well That Ends Well
[IV, 3]

First Soldier

2405

If you could find out a country where but women were
that had received so much shame, you might begin an
impudent nation. Fare ye well, sir; I am for France
too: we shall speak of you there.

4

Antony and Cleopatra
[II, 2]

Mecaenas

806

If it might please you, to enforce no further
The griefs between ye: to forget them quite
Were to remember that the present need
Speaks to atone you.

5

Antony and Cleopatra
[II, 6]

Domitius Enobarus

1309

Sir,
I never loved you much; but I ha' praised ye,
When you have well deserved ten times as much
As I have said you did.

6

Antony and Cleopatra
[II, 6]

Menas

1347

Pray ye, sir?

7

Antony and Cleopatra
[V, 2]

Dolabella

3484

If it might please ye,—

8

As You Like It
[II, 7]

Orlando

1032

I thank ye; and be blest for your good comfort! Exit

9

As You Like It
[V, 1]

Audrey

2202

God ye good ev'n, William.

10

Coriolanus
[I, 1]

Coriolanus

168

He that will give good words to thee will flatter
Beneath abhorring. What would you have, you curs,
That like nor peace nor war? the one affrights you,
The other makes you proud. He that trusts to you,
Where he should find you lions, finds you hares;
Where foxes, geese: you are no surer, no,
Than is the coal of fire upon the ice,
Or hailstone in the sun. Your virtue is
To make him worthy whose offence subdues him
And curse that justice did it.
Who deserves greatness
Deserves your hate; and your affections are
A sick man's appetite, who desires most that
Which would increase his evil. He that depends
Upon your favours swims with fins of lead
And hews down oaks with rushes. Hang ye! Trust Ye?
With every minute you do change a mind,
And call him noble that was now your hate,
Him vile that was your garland. What's the matter,
That in these several places of the city
You cry against the noble senate, who,
Under the gods, keep you in awe, which else
Would feed on one another? What's their seeking?

11

Coriolanus
[I, 6]

Cominius

609

Breathe you, my friends: well fought;
we are come off
Like Romans, neither foolish in our stands,
Nor cowardly in retire: believe me, sirs,
We shall be charged again. Whiles we have struck,
By interims and conveying gusts we have heard
The charges of our friends. Ye Roman gods!
Lead their successes as we wish our own,
That both our powers, with smiling
fronts encountering,
May give you thankful sacrifice.
[Enter a Messenger]
Thy news?

12

Coriolanus
[I, 6]

Coriolanus

649

O, let me clip ye
In arms as sound as when I woo'd, in heart
As merry as when our nuptial day was done,
And tapers burn'd to bedward!

13

Coriolanus
[III, 1]

Sicinius Velutus

1951

Help, ye citizens!
[Enter a rabble of Citizens (Plebeians), with]
the AEdiles]

14

Coriolanus
[III, 1]

Sicinius Velutus

2135

What do ye talk?
Have we not had a taste of his obedience?
Our aediles smote? ourselves resisted? Come.

15

Coriolanus
[III, 2]

Volumnia

2186

You might have been enough the man you are,
With striving less to be so; lesser had been
The thwartings of your dispositions, if
You had not show'd them how ye were disposed
Ere they lack'd power to cross you.

16

Coriolanus
[III, 3]

Sicinius Velutus

2394

Draw near, ye people.

17

Coriolanus
[IV, 3]

Coriolanus

2570

Fare ye well:
Thou hast years upon thee; and thou art too full
Of the wars' surfeits, to go rove with one
That's yet unbruised: bring me but out at gate.
Come, my sweet wife, my dearest mother, and
My friends of noble touch, when I am forth,
Bid me farewell, and smile. I pray you, come.
While I remain above the ground, you shall
Hear from me still, and never of me aught
But what is like me formerly.

18

Coriolanus
[IV, 6]

Cominius

3196

Ye re goodly things, you voices!

19

Cymbeline
[II, 2]

Imogen

923

I have read three hours then: mine eyes are weak:
Fold down the leaf where I have left: to bed:
Take not away the taper, leave it burning;
And if thou canst awake by four o' the clock,
I prithee, call me. Sleep hath seized me wholly
[Exit Lady]
To your protection I commend me, gods.
From fairies and the tempters of the night
Guard me, beseech ye.

20

Cymbeline
[III, 5]

Caius Lucius

1945

Thanks, royal sir.
My emperor hath wrote, I must from hence;
And am right sorry that I must report ye
My master's enemy.

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