Speeches (Lines) for Earl of Worcester
in "Henry IV, Part I"

Total: 35

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,332

Our house, my sovereign liege, little deserves
The scourge of greatness to be used on it;...

2

I,3,468

Who struck this heat up after I was gone?

3

I,3,474

I cannot blame him: was not he proclaim'd
By Richard that dead is the next of blood?

4

I,3,482

And for whose death we in the world's wide mouth
Live scandalized and foully spoken of.

5

I,3,518

Peace, cousin, say no more:
And now I will unclasp a secret book,...

6

I,3,540

He apprehends a world of figures here,
But not the form of what he should attend....

7

I,3,544

Those same noble Scots
That are your prisoners,—

8

I,3,550

You start away
And lend no ear unto my purposes....

9

I,3,562

Hear you, cousin; a word.

10

I,3,569

Farewell, kinsman: I'll talk to you
When you are better temper'd to attend.

11

I,3,592

Nay, if you have not, to it again;
We will stay your leisure.

12

I,3,595

Then once more to your Scottish prisoners.
Deliver them up without their ransom straight,...

13

I,3,607

True; who bears hard
His brother's death at Bristol, the Lord Scroop....

14

I,3,619

And so they shall.

15

I,3,621

And 'tis no little reason bids us speed,
To save our heads by raising of a head;...

16

I,3,630

Cousin, farewell: no further go in this
Than I by letters shall direct your course....

17

III,1,1655

Yea, but a little charge will trench him here
And on this north side win this cape of land;...

18

III,1,1722

In faith, my lord, you are too wilful-blame;
And since your coming hither have done enough...

19

IV,1,2242

I prithee, tell me, doth he keep his bed?

20

IV,1,2246

I would the state of time had first been whole
Ere he by sickness had been visited:...

21

IV,1,2263

Your father's sickness is a maim to us.

22

IV,1,2282

But yet I would your father had been here.
The quality and hair of our attempt...

23

IV,1,2355

Ay, by my faith, that bears a frosty sound.

24

IV,3,2453

It may not be.

25

IV,3,2459

Good cousin, be advised; stir not tonight.

26

IV,3,2485

The number of the king exceedeth ours:
For God's sake. cousin, stay till all come in.

27

V,1,2645

Hear me, my liege:
For mine own part, I could be well content...

28

V,1,2653

It pleased your majesty to turn your looks
Of favour from myself and all our house;...

29

V,2,2770

O, no, my nephew must not know, Sir Richard,
The liberal and kind offer of the king.

30

V,2,2773

Then are we all undone.
It is not possible, it cannot be,...

31

V,2,2802

The king will bid you battle presently.

32

V,2,2807

There is no seeming mercy in the king.

33

V,2,2809

I told him gently of our grievances,
Of his oath-breaking; which he mended thus,...

34

V,2,2819

The Prince of Wales stepp'd forth before the king,
And, nephew, challenged you to single fight.

35

V,5,3152

What I have done my safety urged me to;
And I embrace this fortune patiently,...

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