Speeches (Lines) for Earl of Warwick
in "Henry VI, Part I"

Total: 24

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,4,931

Between two hawks, which flies the higher pitch;
Between two dogs, which hath the deeper mouth;
Between two blades, which bears the better temper:
Between two horses, which doth bear him best;
Between two girls, which hath the merriest eye;
I have perhaps some shallow spirit of judgement;
But in these nice sharp quillets of the law,
Good faith, I am no wiser than a daw.

2

II,4,956

I love no colours, and without all colour
Of base insinuating flattery
I pluck this white rose with Plantagenet.

3

II,4,1013

Now, by God's will, thou wrong'st him, Somerset;
His grandfather was Lionel Duke of Clarence,
Third son to the third Edward King of England:
Spring crestless yeomen from so deep a root?

4

II,4,1053

This blot that they object against your house
Shall be wiped out in the next parliament
Call'd for the truce of Winchester and Gloucester;
And if thou be not then created York,
I will not live to be accounted Warwick.
Meantime, in signal of my love to thee,
Against proud Somerset and William Pole,
Will I upon thy party wear this rose:
And here I prophesy: this brawl to-day,
Grown to this faction in the Temple-garden,
Shall send between the red rose and the white
A thousand souls to death and deadly night.

5

III,1,1274

Roam thither, then.

6

III,1,1276

Ay, see the bishop be not overborne.

7

III,1,1279

Methinks his lordship should be humbler;
it fitteth not a prelate so to plead.

8

III,1,1282

State holy or unhallow'd, what of that?
Is not his grace protector to the king?

9

III,1,1300

An uproar, I dare warrant,
Begun through malice of the bishop's men.

10

III,1,1343

Yield, my lord protector; yield, Winchester;
Except you mean with obstinate repulse
To slay your sovereign and destroy the realm.
You see what mischief and what murder too
Hath been enacted through your enmity;
Then be at peace except ye thirst for blood.

11

III,1,1353

Behold, my Lord of Winchester, the duke
Hath banish'd moody discontented fury,
As by his smoothed brows it doth appear:
Why look you still so stern and tragical?

12

III,1,1362

Sweet king! the bishop hath a kindly gird.
For shame, my lord of Winchester, relent!
What, shall a child instruct you what to do?

13

III,1,1381

Accept this scroll, most gracious sovereign,
Which in the right of Richard Plantagenet
We do exhibit to your majesty.

14

III,1,1392

Let Richard be restored to his blood;
So shall his father's wrongs be recompensed.

15

IV,1,1942

My Lord of York, I promise you, the king
Prettily, methought, did play the orator.

16

IV,1,1946

Tush, that was but his fancy, blame him not;
I dare presume, sweet prince, he thought no harm.

17

V,4,2684

Graceless! wilt thou deny thy parentage?

18

V,4,2726

And hark ye, sirs; because she is a maid,
Spare for no faggots, let there be enow:
Place barrels of pitch upon the fatal stake,
That so her torture may be shortened.

19

V,4,2737

The greatest miracle that e'er ye wrought:
Is all your strict preciseness come to this?

20

V,4,2741

Well, go to; we'll have no bastards live;
Especially since Charles must father it.

21

V,4,2750

A married man! that's most intolerable.

22

V,4,2753

It's sign she hath been liberal and free.

23

V,4,2786

Be patient, York: if we conclude a peace,
It shall be with such strict and severe covenants
As little shall the Frenchmen gain thereby.
[Enter CHARLES, ALENCON, BASTARD OF ORLEANS,]
REIGNIER, and others]

24

V,4,2840

How say'st thou, Charles? shall our condition stand?

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