Speeches (Lines) for Verges
in "Much Ado about Nothing"

Total: 18

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

III,3,1324

Dogberry. Are you good men and true?

Verges. Yea, or else it were pity but they should suffer
salvation, body and soul.


2

III,3,1329

Dogberry. Nay, that were a punishment too good for them, if
they should have any allegiance in them, being
chosen for the prince's watch.

Verges. Well, give them their charge, neighbour Dogberry.


3

III,3,1351

Dogberry. Why, then, take no note of him, but let him go; and
presently call the rest of the watch together and
thank God you are rid of a knave.

Verges. If he will not stand when he is bidden, he is none
of the prince's subjects.


4

III,3,1379

Dogberry. Truly, by your office, you may; but I think they
that touch pitch will be defiled: the most peaceable
way for you, if you do take a thief, is to let him
show himself what he is and steal out of your company.

Verges. You have been always called a merciful man, partner.


5

III,3,1382

Dogberry. Truly, I would not hang a dog by my will, much more
a man who hath any honesty in him.

Verges. If you hear a child cry in the night, you must call
to the nurse and bid her still it.


6

III,3,1388

Dogberry. Why, then, depart in peace, and let the child wake
her with crying; for the ewe that will not hear her
lamb when it baes will never answer a calf when he bleats.

Verges. 'Tis very true.


7

III,3,1392

Dogberry. This is the end of the charge:—you, constable, are
to present the prince's own person: if you meet the
prince in the night, you may stay him.

Verges. Nay, by'r our lady, that I think a' cannot.


8

III,3,1398

Dogberry. Five shillings to one on't, with any man that knows
the statutes, he may stay him: marry, not without
the prince be willing; for, indeed, the watch ought
to offend no man; and it is an offence to stay a
man against his will.

Verges. By'r lady, I think it be so.


9

III,5,1586

Dogberry. Marry, this it is, sir.

Verges. Yes, in truth it is, sir.


10

III,5,1592

Dogberry. Goodman Verges, sir, speaks a little off the
matter: an old man, sir, and his wits are not so
blunt as, God help, I would desire they were; but,
in faith, honest as the skin between his brows.

Verges. Yes, I thank God I am as honest as any man living
that is an old man and no honester than I.


11

III,5,1605

Dogberry. Yea, an 'twere a thousand pound more than 'tis; for
I hear as good exclamation on your worship as of any
man in the city; and though I be but a poor man, I
am glad to hear it.

Verges. And so am I.


12

III,5,1607

Leonato. I would fain know what you have to say.

Verges. Marry, sir, our watch to-night, excepting your
worship's presence, ha' ta'en a couple of as arrant
knaves as any in Messina.


13

III,5,1636

Dogberry. Go, good partner, go, get you to Francis Seacole;
bid him bring his pen and inkhorn to the gaol: we
are now to examination these men.

Verges. And we must do it wisely.


14

IV,2,1985

Dogberry. Is our whole dissembly appeared?

Verges. O, a stool and a cushion for the sexton.


15

IV,2,1988

Dogberry. Marry, that am I and my partner.

Verges. Nay, that's certain; we have the exhibition to examine.


16

IV,2,2029

Dogberry. Flat burglary as ever was committed.

Verges. Yea, by mass, that it is.


17

IV,2,2046

Dogberry. Come, let them be opinioned.

Verges. Let them be in the hands—


18

V,1,2328

Dogberry. Come, bring away the plaintiffs: by this time our
sexton hath reformed Signior Leonato of the matter:
and, masters, do not forget to specify, when time
and place shall serve, that I am an ass.

Verges. Here, here comes master Signior Leonato, and the
Sexton too.


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