Speeches (Lines) for Tybalt
in "Romeo and Juliet"

Total: 17

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,80

(stage directions). [Enter TYBALT]

Tybalt. What, art thou drawn among these heartless hinds?
Turn thee, Benvolio, look upon thy death.


2

I,1,84

Benvolio. I do but keep the peace: put up thy sword,
Or manage it to part these men with me.

Tybalt. What, drawn, and talk of peace! I hate the word,
As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee:
Have at thee, coward!
[They fight]
[Enter, several of both houses, who join the fray;
then enter Citizens, with clubs]


3

I,5,676

Romeo. O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!
It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night
Like a rich jewel in an Ethiope's ear;
Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear!
So shows a snowy dove trooping with crows,
As yonder lady o'er her fellows shows.
The measure done, I'll watch her place of stand,
And, touching hers, make blessed my rude hand.
Did my heart love till now? forswear it, sight!
For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night.

Tybalt. This, by his voice, should be a Montague.
Fetch me my rapier, boy. What dares the slave
Come hither, cover'd with an antic face,
To fleer and scorn at our solemnity?
Now, by the stock and honour of my kin,
To strike him dead, I hold it not a sin.


4

I,5,683

Capulet. Why, how now, kinsman! wherefore storm you so?

Tybalt. Uncle, this is a Montague, our foe,
A villain that is hither come in spite,
To scorn at our solemnity this night.


5

I,5,687

Capulet. Young Romeo is it?

Tybalt. 'Tis he, that villain Romeo.


6

I,5,698

Capulet. Content thee, gentle coz, let him alone;
He bears him like a portly gentleman;
And, to say truth, Verona brags of him
To be a virtuous and well-govern'd youth:
I would not for the wealth of all the town
Here in my house do him disparagement:
Therefore be patient, take no note of him:
It is my will, the which if thou respect,
Show a fair presence and put off these frowns,
And ill-beseeming semblance for a feast.

Tybalt. It fits, when such a villain is a guest:
I'll not endure him.


7

I,5,706

Capulet. He shall be endured:
What, goodman boy! I say, he shall: go to;
Am I the master here, or you? go to.
You'll not endure him! God shall mend my soul!
You'll make a mutiny among my guests!
You will set cock-a-hoop! you'll be the man!

Tybalt. Why, uncle, 'tis a shame.


8

I,5,714

Capulet. Go to, go to;
You are a saucy boy: is't so, indeed?
This trick may chance to scathe you, I know what:
You must contrary me! marry, 'tis time.
Well said, my hearts! You are a princox; go:
Be quiet, or—More light, more light! For shame!
I'll make you quiet. What, cheerly, my hearts!

Tybalt. Patience perforce with wilful choler meeting
Makes my flesh tremble in their different greeting.
I will withdraw: but this intrusion shall
Now seeming sweet convert to bitter gall.


9

III,1,1535

(stage directions). [Enter TYBALT and others]

Tybalt. Follow me close, for I will speak to them.
Gentlemen, good den: a word with one of you.


10

III,1,1539

Mercutio. And but one word with one of us? couple it with
something; make it a word and a blow.

Tybalt. You shall find me apt enough to that, sir, an you
will give me occasion.


11

III,1,1542

Mercutio. Could you not take some occasion without giving?

Tybalt. Mercutio, thou consort'st with Romeo,—


12

III,1,1554

(stage directions). [Enter ROMEO]

Tybalt. Well, peace be with you, sir: here comes my man.


13

III,1,1558

Mercutio. But I'll be hanged, sir, if he wear your livery:
Marry, go before to field, he'll be your follower;
Your worship in that sense may call him 'man.'

Tybalt. Romeo, the hate I bear thee can afford
No better term than this,—thou art a villain.


14

III,1,1564

Romeo. Tybalt, the reason that I have to love thee
Doth much excuse the appertaining rage
To such a greeting: villain am I none;
Therefore farewell; I see thou know'st me not.

Tybalt. Boy, this shall not excuse the injuries
That thou hast done me; therefore turn and draw.


15

III,1,1575

Mercutio. O calm, dishonourable, vile submission!
Alla stoccata carries it away.
[Draws]
Tybalt, you rat-catcher, will you walk?

Tybalt. What wouldst thou have with me?


16

III,1,1582

Mercutio. Good king of cats, nothing but one of your nine
lives; that I mean to make bold withal, and as you
shall use me hereafter, drybeat the rest of the
eight. Will you pluck your sword out of his pitcher
by the ears? make haste, lest mine be about your
ears ere it be out.

Tybalt. I am for you.


17

III,1,1639

Romeo. Alive, in triumph! and Mercutio slain!
Away to heaven, respective lenity,
And fire-eyed fury be my conduct now!
[Re-enter TYBALT]
Now, Tybalt, take the villain back again,
That late thou gavest me; for Mercutio's soul
Is but a little way above our heads,
Staying for thine to keep him company:
Either thou, or I, or both, must go with him.

Tybalt. Thou, wretched boy, that didst consort him here,
Shalt with him hence.


Return to the "Romeo and Juliet" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS