Speeches (Lines) for Tranio
in "Taming of the Shrew"

Total: 90

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,318

Mi perdonato, gentle master mine;
I am in all affected as yourself;...

2

I,1,343

Master, some show to welcome us to town.

3

I,1,364

Husht, master! Here's some good pastime toward;
That wench is stark mad or wonderful froward.

4

I,1,369

Well said, master; mum! and gaze your fill.

5

I,1,437

I pray, sir, tell me, is it possible
That love should of a sudden take such hold?

6

I,1,450

Master, it is no time to chide you now;
Affection is not rated from the heart;...

7

I,1,456

Master, you look'd so longly on the maid.
Perhaps you mark'd not what's the pith of all.

8

I,1,462

Saw you no more? Mark'd you not how her sister
Began to scold and raise up such a storm...

9

I,1,468

Nay, then 'tis time to stir him from his trance.
I pray, awake, sir. If you love the maid,...

10

I,1,479

Ay, marry, am I, sir, and now 'tis plotted.

11

I,1,481

Master, for my hand,
Both our inventions meet and jump in one.

12

I,1,484

You will be schoolmaster,
And undertake the teaching of the maid-...

13

I,1,488

Not possible; for who shall bear your part
And be in Padua here Vincentio's son;...

14

I,1,504

So had you need. [They exchange habits]
In brief, sir, sith it your pleasure is,...

15

I,1,534

So could I, faith, boy, to have the next wish after,
That Lucentio indeed had Baptista's youngest daughter....

16

I,2,770

Gentlemen, God save you! If I may be bold,
Tell me, I beseech you, which is the readiest way...

17

I,2,774

Even he, Biondello.

18

I,2,776

Perhaps him and her, sir; what have you to do?

19

I,2,778

I love no chiders, sir. Biondello, let's away.

20

I,2,782

And if I be, sir, is it any offence?

21

I,2,784

Why, sir, I pray, are not the streets as free
For me as for you?

22

I,2,787

For what reason, I beseech you?

23

I,2,791

Softly, my masters! If you be gentlemen,
Do me this right- hear me with patience....

24

I,2,806

No, sir, but hear I do that he hath two:
The one as famous for a scolding tongue...

25

I,2,818

If it be so, sir, that you are the man
Must stead us all, and me amongst the rest;...

26

I,2,828

Sir, I shall not be slack; in sign whereof,
Please ye we may contrive this afternoon,...

27

II,1,928

Pardon me, sir, the boldness is mine own
That, being a stranger in this city here,...

28

II,1,943

Of Pisa, sir; son to Vincentio.

29

II,1,1152

Is this your speeding? Nay, then good-night our part!

30

II,1,1180

'Twas a commodity lay fretting by you;
'Twill bring you gain, or perish on the seas.

31

II,1,1187

And I am one that love Bianca more
Than words can witness or your thoughts can guess.

32

II,1,1190

Greybeard, thy love doth freeze.

33

II,1,1193

But youth in ladies' eyes that flourisheth.

34

II,1,1216

That 'only' came well in. Sir, list to me:
I am my father's heir and only son;...

35

II,1,1230

Gremio, 'tis known my father hath no less
Than three great argosies, besides two galliasses,...

36

II,1,1237

Why, then the maid is mine from all the world
By your firm promise; Gremio is out-vied.

37

II,1,1243

That's but a cavil; he is old, I young.

38

II,1,1258

A vengeance on your crafty withered hide!
Yet I have fac'd it with a card of ten....

39

III,2,1384

Patience, good Katherine, and Baptista too.
Upon my life, Petruchio means but well,...

40

III,2,1404

But, say, what to thine old news?

41

III,2,1429

'Tis some odd humour pricks him to this fashion;
Yet oftentimes lie goes but mean-apparell'd.

42

III,2,1448

Not so well apparell'd
As I wish you were.

43

III,2,1461

And tell us what occasion of import
Hath all so long detain'd you from your wife,...

44

III,2,1471

See not your bride in these unreverent robes;
Go to my chamber, put on clothes of mine.

45

III,2,1484

He hath some meaning in his mad attire.
We will persuade him, be it possible,...

46

III,2,1489

But to her love concerneth us to add
Her father's liking; which to bring to pass,...

47

III,2,1504

That by degrees we mean to look into
And watch our vantage in this business;...

48

III,2,1513

And is the bride and bridegroom coming home?

49

III,2,1516

Curster than she? Why, 'tis impossible.

50

III,2,1518

Why, she's a devil, a devil, the devil's dam.

51

III,2,1528

What said the wench, when he rose again?

52

III,2,1561

Let us entreat you stay till after dinner.

53

III,2,1609

Of all mad matches, never was the like.

54

III,2,1618

Shall sweet Bianca practise how to bride it?

55

IV,2,1824

Is 't possible, friend Licio, that Mistress Bianca
Doth fancy any other but Lucentio?...

56

IV,2,1840

O despiteful love! unconstant womankind!
I tell thee, Licio, this is wonderful.

57

IV,2,1848

Signior Hortensio, I have often heard
Of your entire affection to Bianca;...

58

IV,2,1858

And here I take the like unfeigned oath,
Never to marry with her though she would entreat;...

59

IV,2,1870

Mistress Bianca, bless you with such grace
As 'longeth to a lover's blessed case!...

60

IV,2,1875

Mistress, we have.

61

IV,2,1877

I' faith, he'll have a lusty widow now,
That shall be woo'd and wedded in a day.

62

IV,2,1880

Ay, and he'll tame her.

63

IV,2,1882

Faith, he is gone unto the taming-school.

64

IV,2,1884

Ay, mistress; and Petruchio is the master,
That teacheth tricks eleven and twenty long,...

65

IV,2,1892

What is he, Biondello?

66

IV,2,1897

If he be credulous and trust my tale,
I'll make him glad to seem Vincentio,...

67

IV,2,1905

And you, sir; you are welcome.
Travel you far on, or are you at the farthest?

68

IV,2,1910

What countryman, I pray?

69

IV,2,1912

Of Mantua, sir? Marry, God forbid,
And come to Padua, careless of your life!

70

IV,2,1915

'Tis death for any one in Mantua
To come to Padua. Know you not the cause?...

71

IV,2,1925

Well, sir, to do you courtesy,
This will I do, and this I will advise you-...

72

IV,2,1930

Among them know you one Vincentio?

73

IV,2,1933

He is my father, sir; and, sooth to say,
In count'nance somewhat doth resemble you.

74

IV,2,1937

To save your life in this extremity,
This favour will I do you for his sake;...

75

IV,2,1949

Then go with me to make the matter good.
This, by the way, I let you understand:...

76

IV,4,2158

Sir, this is the house; please it you that I call?

77

IV,4,2163

'Tis well; and hold your own, in any case,
With such austerity as longeth to a father.

78

IV,4,2168

Fear you not him. Sirrah Biondello,
Now do your duty throughly, I advise you....

79

IV,4,2172

But hast thou done thy errand to Baptista?

80

IV,4,2175

Th'art a tall fellow; hold thee that to drink.
Here comes Baptista. Set your countenance, sir....

81

IV,4,2207

I thank you, sir. Where then do you know best
We be affied, and such assurance ta'en...

82

IV,4,2214

Then at my lodging, an it like you.
There doth my father lie; and there this night...

83

IV,4,2227

Dally not with the gods, but get thee gone.
[Exit BIONDELLO]...

84

V,1,2405

Sir, what are you that offer to beat my servant?

85

V,1,2411

How now! what's the matter?

86

V,1,2413

Sir, you seem a sober ancient gentleman by your habit, but
your words show you a madman. Why, sir, what 'cerns it you if I...

87

V,1,2427

Call forth an officer.
[Enter one with an OFFICER]...

88

V,1,2438

Then thou wert best say that I am not Lucentio.

89

V,2,2544

O, sir, Lucentio slipp'd me like his greyhound,
Which runs himself, and catches for his master.

90

V,2,2547

'Tis well, sir, that you hunted for yourself;
'Tis thought your deer does hold you at a bay.

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