Speeches (Lines) for Touchstone
in "As You Like It"

Total: 74

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,194

Mistress, you must come away to your father.

2

I,2,196

No, by mine honour; but I was bid to come for you.

3

I,2,198

Of a certain knight that swore by his honour they were
good pancakes, and swore by his honour the mustard was naught....

4

I,2,204

Stand you both forth now: stroke your chins, and swear
by your beards that I am a knave.

5

I,2,207

By my knavery, if I had it, then I were. But if you
swear by that that is not, you are not forsworn; no more was this...

6

I,2,213

One that old Frederick, your father, loves.

7

I,2,216

The more pity that fools may not speak wisely what wise
men do foolishly.

8

I,2,231

Or as the Destinies decrees.

9

I,2,233

Nay, if I keep not my rank-

10

I,2,254

But what is the sport, monsieur, that the ladies have
lost?

11

I,2,257

Thus men may grow wiser every day. It is the first time
that ever I heard breaking of ribs was sport for ladies.

12

II,4,724

I care not for my spirits, if my legs were not weary.

13

II,4,730

For my part, I had rather bear with you than bear you;
yet I should bear no cross if I did bear you; for I think you...

14

II,4,734

Ay, now am I in Arden; the more fool I; when I was at
home I was in a better place; but travellers must be content.

15

II,4,763

And I mine. I remember, when I was in love, I broke my
sword upon a stone, and bid him take that for coming a-night to...

16

II,4,773

Nay, I shall ne'er be ware of mine own wit till I break
my shins against it.

17

II,4,777

And mine; but it grows something stale with me.

18

II,4,781

Holla, you clown!

19

II,4,784

Your betters, sir.

20

III,2,1134

Truly, shepherd, in respect of itself, it is a good
life; but in respect that it is a shepherd's life, it is nought....

21

III,2,1150

Such a one is a natural philosopher. Wast ever in
court, shepherd?

22

III,2,1153

Then thou art damn'd.

23

III,2,1155

Truly, thou art damn'd, like an ill-roasted egg, all on
one side.

24

III,2,1158

Why, if thou never wast at court thou never saw'st good
manners; if thou never saw'st good manners, then thy manners must...

25

III,2,1167

Instance, briefly; come, instance.

26

III,2,1170

Why, do not your courtier's hands sweat? And is not the
grease of a mutton as wholesome as the sweat of a man? Shallow,...

27

III,2,1174

Your lips will feel them the sooner. Shallow again. A
more sounder instance; come.

28

III,2,1179

Most shallow man! thou worm's meat in respect of a good
piece of flesh indeed! Learn of the wise, and perpend: civet is...

29

III,2,1184

Wilt thou rest damn'd? God help thee, shallow man! God
make incision in thee! thou art raw.

30

III,2,1190

That is another simple sin in you: to bring the ewes
and the rams together, and to offer to get your living by the...

31

III,2,1207

I'll rhyme you so eight years together, dinners, and
suppers, and sleeping hours, excepted. It is the right...

32

III,2,1211

For a taste:
If a hart do lack a hind,...

33

III,2,1227

Truly, the tree yields bad fruit.

34

III,2,1232

You have said; but whether wisely or no, let the forest
judge....

35

III,2,1272

Come, shepherd, let us make an honourable retreat;
though not with bag and baggage, yet with scrip and scrippage.

36

III,3,1506

Come apace, good Audrey; I will fetch up your goats,
Audrey. And how, Audrey, am I the man yet? Doth my simple feature...

37

III,3,1510

I am here with thee and thy goats, as the most
capricious poet, honest Ovid, was among the Goths.

38

III,3,1514

When a man's verses cannot be understood, nor a man's
good wit seconded with the forward child understanding, it...

39

III,3,1520

No, truly; for the truest poetry is the most feigning,
and lovers are given to poetry; and what they swear in poetry may...

40

III,3,1524

I do, truly, for thou swear'st to me thou art honest;
now, if thou wert a poet, I might have some hope thou didst...

41

III,3,1528

No, truly, unless thou wert hard-favour'd; for honesty
coupled to beauty is to have honey a sauce to sugar.

42

III,3,1533

Truly, and to cast away honesty upon a foul slut were
to put good meat into an unclean dish.

43

III,3,1536

Well, praised be the gods for thy foulness;
sluttishness may come hereafter. But be it as it may be, I will...

44

III,3,1543

Amen. A man may, if he were of a fearful heart, stagger
in this attempt; for here we have no temple but the wood, no...

45

III,3,1560

I will not take her on gift of any man.

46

III,3,1563

Good even, good Master What-ye-call't; how do you, sir?
You are very well met. Goddild you for your last company. I am...

47

III,3,1568

As the ox hath his bow, sir, the horse his curb, and
the falcon her bells, so man hath his desires; and as pigeons...

48

III,3,1576

[Aside] I am not in the mind but I were better to be
married of him than of another; for he is not like to marry me...

49

III,3,1581

Come, sweet Audrey;
We must be married or we must live in bawdry....

50

V,1,2189

We shall find a time, Audrey; patience, gentle Audrey.

51

V,1,2192

A most wicked Sir Oliver, Audrey, a most vile Martext.
But, Audrey, there is a youth here in the forest lays claim to...

52

V,1,2198

It is meat and drink to me to see a clown. By my troth,
we that have good wits have much to answer for: we shall be...

53

V,1,2204

Good ev'n, gentle friend. Cover thy head, cover thy
head; nay, prithee be cover'd. How old are you, friend?

54

V,1,2207

A ripe age. Is thy name William?

55

V,1,2209

A fair name. Wast born i' th' forest here?

56

V,1,2211

'Thank God.' A good answer.
Art rich?

57

V,1,2214

'So so' is good, very good, very excellent good; and
yet it is not; it is but so so. Art thou wise?

58

V,1,2217

Why, thou say'st well. I do now remember a saying: 'The
fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be...

59

V,1,2224

Give me your hand. Art thou learned?

60

V,1,2226

Then learn this of me: to have is to have; for it is a
figure in rhetoric that drink, being pour'd out of cup into a...

61

V,1,2232

He, sir, that must marry this woman. Therefore, you
clown, abandon- which is in the vulgar leave- the society- which...

62

V,1,2246

Trip, Audrey, trip, Audrey. I attend, I attend.

63

V,3,2361

To-morrow is the joyful day, Audrey; to-morrow will we
be married.

64

V,3,2368

By my troth, well met. Come sit, sit, and a song.

65

V,3,2394

Truly, young gentlemen, though there was no great
matter in the ditty, yet the note was very untuneable.

66

V,3,2398

By my troth, yes; I count it but time lost to hear such
a foolish song. God buy you; and God mend your voices. Come,...

67

V,4,2442

Salutation and greeting to you all!

68

V,4,2446

If any man doubt that, let him put me to my purgation.
I have trod a measure; I have flatt'red a lady; I have been...

69

V,4,2452

Faith, we met, and found the quarrel was upon the
seventh cause.

70

V,4,2456

God 'ild you, sir; I desire you of the like. I press in
here, sir, amongst the rest of the country copulatives, to swear...

71

V,4,2464

According to the fool's bolt, sir, and such dulcet
diseases.

72

V,4,2468

Upon a lie seven times removed- bear your body more
seeming, Audrey- as thus, sir. I did dislike the cut of a certain...

73

V,4,2481

I durst go no further than the Lie Circumstantial, nor
he durst not give me the Lie Direct; and so we measur'd swords...

74

V,4,2485

O, sir, we quarrel in print by the book, as you have
books for good manners. I will name you the degrees. The first,...

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