Speeches (Lines) for Christopher Sly
in "Taming of the Shrew"

Total: 24

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

Prologue,1,2

I'll pheeze you, in faith.

2

Prologue,1,4

Y'are a baggage; the Slys are no rogues. Look in the
chronicles: we came in with Richard Conqueror. Therefore, paucas
pallabris; let the world slide. Sessa!

3

Prologue,1,8

No, not a denier. Go by, Saint Jeronimy, go to thy cold bed
and warm thee.

4

Prologue,1,12

Third, or fourth, or fifth borough, I'll answer him by law.
I'll not budge an inch, boy; let him come, and kindly.
[Falls asleep]
Wind horns. Enter a LORD from hunting, with his train

5

Prologue,2,148

For God's sake, a pot of small ale.

6

Prologue,2,152

I am Christophero Sly; call not me 'honour' nor 'lordship.' I
ne'er drank sack in my life; and if you give me any conserves,
give me conserves of beef. Ne'er ask me what raiment I'll wear,
for I have no more doublets than backs, no more stockings than
legs, nor no more shoes than feet- nay, sometime more feet than
shoes, or such shoes as my toes look through the overleather.

7

Prologue,2,162

What, would you make me mad? Am not I Christopher Sly, old
Sly's son of Burton Heath; by birth a pedlar, by education a
cardmaker, by transmutation a bear-herd, and now by present
profession a tinker? Ask Marian Hacket, the fat ale-wife of
Wincot, if she know me not; if she say I am not fourteen pence on
the score for sheer ale, score me up for the lying'st knave in
Christendom. What! I am not bestraught. [Taking a pot of ale]
Here's-

8

Prologue,2,213

Am I a lord and have I such a lady?
Or do I dream? Or have I dream'd till now?
I do not sleep: I see, I hear, I speak;
I smell sweet savours, and I feel soft things.
Upon my life, I am a lord indeed,
And not a tinker, nor Christopher Sly.
Well, bring our lady hither to our sight;
And once again, a pot o' th' smallest ale.

9

Prologue,2,226

These fifteen years! by my fay, a goodly nap.
But did I never speak of all that time?

10

Prologue,2,235

Ay, the woman's maid of the house.

11

Prologue,2,242

Now, Lord be thanked for my good amends!

12

Prologue,2,245

I thank thee; thou shalt not lose by it.

13

Prologue,2,247

Marry, I fare well; for here is cheer enough.
Where is my wife?

14

Prologue,2,250

Are you my wife, and will not call me husband?
My men should call me 'lord'; I am your goodman.

15

Prologue,2,254

I know it well. What must I call her?

16

Prologue,2,256

Al'ce madam, or Joan madam?

17

Prologue,2,258

Madam wife, they say that I have dream'd
And slept above some fifteen year or more.

18

Prologue,2,262

'Tis much. Servants, leave me and her alone.
[Exeunt SERVANTS]
Madam, undress you, and come now to bed.

19

Prologue,2,272

Ay, it stands so that I may hardly tarry so long. But I would be
loath to fall into my dreams again. I will therefore tarry in
despite of the flesh and the blood.

20

Prologue,2,284

Marry, I will; let them play it. Is not a comonty a
Christmas gambold or a tumbling-trick?

21

Prologue,2,287

What, household stuff?

22

Prologue,2,289

Well, we'll see't. Come, madam wife, sit by my side and let
the world slip;-we shall ne'er be younger.

23

I,1,546

Yes, by Saint Anne do I. A good matter, surely; comes there
any more of it?

24

I,1,549

'Tis a very excellent piece of work, madam lady
Would 'twere done! [They sit and mark]

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