Speeches (Lines) for Slender
in "Merry Wives of Windsor"

Total: 56

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,5

In the county of Gloucester, justice of peace and
'Coram.'

2

I,1,8

Ay, and 'Rato-lorum' too; and a gentleman born,
master parson; who writes himself 'Armigero,' in any...

3

I,1,13

All his successors gone before him hath done't; and
all his ancestors that come after him may: they may...

4

I,1,21

I may quarter, coz.

5

I,1,44

Mistress Anne Page? She has brown hair, and speaks
small like a woman.

6

I,1,54

Did her grandsire leave her seven hundred pound?

7

I,1,56

I know the young gentlewoman; she has good gifts.

8

I,1,81

How does your fallow greyhound, sir? I heard say he
was outrun on Cotsall.

9

I,1,84

You'll not confess, you'll not confess.

10

I,1,115

Marry, sir, I have matter in my head against you;
and against your cony-catching rascals, Bardolph,...

11

I,1,119

Ay, it is no matter.

12

I,1,121

Ay, it is no matter.

13

I,1,123

Where's Simple, my man? Can you tell, cousin?

14

I,1,138

Ay, by these gloves, did he, or I would I might
never come in mine own great chamber again else, of...

15

I,1,149

By these gloves, then, 'twas he.

16

I,1,153

By this hat, then, he in the red face had it; for
though I cannot remember what I did when you made me...

17

I,1,162

Ay, you spake in Latin then too; but 'tis no
matter: I'll ne'er be drunk whilst I live again,...

18

I,1,173

O heaven! this is Mistress Anne Page.

19

I,1,182

I had rather than forty shillings I had my Book of
Songs and Sonnets here....

20

I,1,195

Ay, sir, you shall find me reasonable; if it be so,
I shall do that that is reason.

21

I,1,198

So I do, sir.

22

I,1,201

Nay, I will do as my cousin Shallow says: I pray
you, pardon me; he's a justice of peace in his...

23

I,1,208

Why, if it be so, I will marry her upon any
reasonable demands.

24

I,1,216

I hope, sir, I will do as it shall become one that
would do reason.

25

I,1,222

I will do a greater thing than that, upon your
request, cousin, in any reason.

26

I,1,226

I will marry her, sir, at your request: but if there
be no great love in the beginning, yet heaven may...

27

I,1,237

Ay, or else I would I might be hanged, la!

28

I,1,247

No, I thank you, forsooth, heartily; I am very well.

29

I,1,249

I am not a-hungry, I thank you, forsooth. Go,
sirrah, for all you are my man, go wait upon my...

30

I,1,259

I' faith, I'll eat nothing; I thank you as much as
though I did.

31

I,1,262

I had rather walk here, I thank you. I bruised
my shin th' other day with playing at sword and...

32

I,1,269

I love the sport well but I shall as soon quarrel at
it as any man in England. You are afraid, if you see...

33

I,1,273

That's meat and drink to me, now. I have seen
Sackerson loose twenty times, and have taken him by...

34

I,1,281

I'll eat nothing, I thank you, sir.

35

I,1,283

Nay, pray you, lead the way.

36

I,1,285

Mistress Anne, yourself shall go first.

37

I,1,287

I'll rather be unmannerly than troublesome.
You do yourself wrong, indeed, la!

38

II,3,1120

Give you good morrow, sir.

39

III,1,1232

[Aside] Ah, sweet Anne Page!

40

III,1,1300

[Aside] O sweet Anne Page!

41

III,2,1365

And so must I, sir: we have appointed to dine with
Mistress Anne, and I would not break with her for...

42

III,2,1370

I hope I have your good will, father Page.

43

III,4,1657

I'll make a shaft or a bolt on't: 'slid, 'tis but
venturing.

44

III,4,1660

No, she shall not dismay me: I care not for that,
but that I am afeard.

45

III,4,1670

I had a father, Mistress Anne; my uncle can tell you
good jests of him. Pray you, uncle, tell Mistress...

46

III,4,1675

Ay, that I do; as well as I love any woman in
Gloucestershire.

47

III,4,1678

Ay, that I will, come cut and long-tail, under the
degree of a squire.

48

III,4,1685

Now, good Mistress Anne,—

49

III,4,1687

My will! 'od's heartlings, that's a pretty jest
indeed! I ne'er made my will yet, I thank heaven; I...

50

III,4,1691

Truly, for mine own part, I would little or nothing
with you. Your father and my uncle hath made...

51

V,2,2515

Ay, forsooth; I have spoke with her and we have a
nay-word how to know one another: I come to her in...

52

V,5,2749

Whoa ho! ho, father Page!

53

V,5,2751

Dispatched! I'll make the best in Gloucestershire
know on't; would I were hanged, la, else.

54

V,5,2754

I came yonder at Eton to marry Mistress Anne Page,
and she's a great lubberly boy. If it had not been...

55

V,5,2761

What need you tell me that? I think so, when I took
a boy for a girl. If I had been married to him, for...

56

V,5,2767

I went to her in white, and cried 'mum,' and she
cried 'budget,' as Anne and I had appointed; and yet...

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