Speeches (Lines) for Sir Hugh Evans
in "Merry Wives of Windsor"

Total: 87

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,17

The dozen white louses do become an old coat well;
it agrees well, passant; it is a familiar beast to
man, and signifies love.

2

I,1,23

It is marring indeed, if he quarter it.

3

I,1,25

Yes, py'r lady; if he has a quarter of your coat,
there is but three skirts for yourself, in my
simple conjectures: but that is all one. If Sir
John Falstaff have committed disparagements unto
you, I am of the church, and will be glad to do my
benevolence to make atonements and compremises
between you.

4

I,1,33

It is not meet the council hear a riot; there is no
fear of Got in a riot: the council, look you, shall
desire to hear the fear of Got, and not to hear a
riot; take your vizaments in that.

5

I,1,39

It is petter that friends is the sword, and end it:
and there is also another device in my prain, which
peradventure prings goot discretions with it: there
is Anne Page, which is daughter to Master Thomas
Page, which is pretty virginity.

6

I,1,46

It is that fery person for all the orld, as just as
you will desire; and seven hundred pounds of moneys,
and gold and silver, is her grandsire upon his
death's-bed—Got deliver to a joyful resurrections!
—give, when she is able to overtake seventeen years
old: it were a goot motion if we leave our pribbles
and prabbles, and desire a marriage between Master
Abraham and Mistress Anne Page.

7

I,1,55

Ay, and her father is make her a petter penny.

8

I,1,57

Seven hundred pounds and possibilities is goot gifts.

9

I,1,59

Shall I tell you a lie? I do despise a liar as I do
despise one that is false, or as I despise one that
is not true. The knight, Sir John, is there; and, I
beseech you, be ruled by your well-willers. I will
peat the door for Master Page.
[Knocks]
What, hoa! Got pless your house here!

10

I,1,68

Here is Got's plessing, and your friend, and Justice
Shallow; and here young Master Slender, that
peradventures shall tell you another tale, if
matters grow to your likings.

11

I,1,93

It is spoke as a Christians ought to speak.

12

I,1,112

Pauca verba, Sir John; goot worts.

13

I,1,124

Peace, I pray you. Now let us understand. There is
three umpires in this matter, as I understand; that
is, Master Page, fidelicet Master Page; and there is
myself, fidelicet myself; and the three party is,
lastly and finally, mine host of the Garter.

14

I,1,130

Fery goot: I will make a prief of it in my note-
book; and we will afterwards ork upon the cause with
as great discreetly as we can.

15

I,1,135

The tevil and his tam! what phrase is this, 'He
hears with ear'? why, it is affectations.

16

I,1,144

No; it is false, if it is a pick-purse.

17

I,1,159

It is his five senses: fie, what the ignorance is!

18

I,1,167

So Got udge me, that is a virtuous mind.

19

I,1,199

Give ear to his motions, Master Slender: I will
description the matter to you, if you be capacity of it.

20

I,1,204

But that is not the question: the question is
concerning your marriage.

21

I,1,207

Marry, is it; the very point of it; to Mistress Anne Page.

22

I,1,210

But can you affection the 'oman? Let us command to
know that of your mouth or of your lips; for divers
philosophers hold that the lips is parcel of the
mouth. Therefore, precisely, can you carry your
good will to the maid?

23

I,1,218

Nay, Got's lords and his ladies! you must speak
possitable, if you can carry her your desires
towards her.

24

I,1,233

It is a fery discretion answer; save the fall is in
the ort 'dissolutely:' the ort is, according to our
meaning, 'resolutely:' his meaning is good.

25

I,1,244

Od's plessed will! I will not be absence at the grace.

26

I,2,291

Go your ways, and ask of Doctor Caius' house which
is the way: and there dwells one Mistress Quickly,
which is in the manner of his nurse, or his dry
nurse, or his cook, or his laundry, his washer, and
his wringer.

27

I,2,297

Nay, it is petter yet. Give her this letter; for it
is a 'oman that altogether's acquaintance with
Mistress Anne Page: and the letter is, to desire
and require her to solicit your master's desires to
Mistress Anne Page. I pray you, be gone: I will
make an end of my dinner; there's pippins and cheese to come.

28

III,1,1191

I pray you now, good master Slender's serving-man,
and friend Simple by your name, which way have you
looked for Master Caius, that calls himself doctor of physic?

29

III,1,1197

I most fehemently desire you you will also look that
way.

30

III,1,1201

'Pless my soul, how full of chollors I am, and
trempling of mind! I shall be glad if he have
deceived me. How melancholies I am! I will knog
his urinals about his knave's costard when I have
good opportunities for the ork. 'Pless my soul!
[Sings]
To shallow rivers, to whose falls
Melodious birds sings madrigals;
There will we make our peds of roses,
And a thousand fragrant posies.
To shallow—
Mercy on me! I have a great dispositions to cry.
[Sings]
Melodious birds sing madrigals—
When as I sat in Pabylon—
And a thousand vagram posies.
To shallow &c.

31

III,1,1220

He's welcome.
[Sings]
To shallow rivers, to whose falls-
Heaven prosper the right! What weapons is he?

32

III,1,1227

Pray you, give me my gown; or else keep it in your arms.

33

III,1,1234

'Pless you from his mercy sake, all of you!

34

III,1,1239

There is reasons and causes for it.

35

III,1,1241

Fery well: what is it?

36

III,1,1249

What is he?

37

III,1,1252

Got's will, and his passion of my heart! I had as
lief you would tell me of a mess of porridge.

38

III,1,1255

He has no more knowledge in Hibocrates and Galen,
—and he is a knave besides; a cowardly knave as you
would desires to be acquainted withal.

39

III,1,1269

[Aside to DOCTOR CAIUS] Pray you, use your patience:
in good time.

40

III,1,1272

[Aside to DOCTOR CAIUS] Pray you let us not be
laughing-stocks to other men's humours; I desire you
in friendship, and I will one way or other make you amends.
[Aloud]
I will knog your urinals about your knave's cockscomb
for missing your meetings and appointments.

41

III,1,1281

As I am a Christians soul now, look you, this is the
place appointed: I'll be judgement by mine host of
the Garter.

42

III,1,1304

This is well; he has made us his vlouting-stog. I
desire you that we may be friends; and let us knog
our prains together to be revenge on this same
scall, scurvy cogging companion, the host of the Garter.

43

III,1,1310

Well, I will smite his noddles. Pray you, follow.

44

III,3,1562

This is fery fantastical humours and jealousies.

45

III,3,1598

If there be any pody in the house, and in the
chambers, and in the coffers, and in the presses,
heaven forgive my sins at the day of judgment!

46

III,3,1607

You suffer for a pad conscience: your wife is as
honest a 'omans as I will desires among five
thousand, and five hundred too.

47

III,3,1621

If there is one, I shall make two in the company.

48

III,3,1624

I pray you now, remembrance tomorrow on the lousy
knave, mine host.

49

III,3,1627

A lousy knave, to have his gibes and his mockeries!

50

IV,1,1901

No; Master Slender is let the boys leave to play.

51

IV,1,1906

Come hither, William; hold up your head; come.

52

IV,1,1909

William, how many numbers is in nouns?

53

IV,1,1913

Peace your tattlings! What is 'fair,' William?

54

IV,1,1916

You are a very simplicity 'oman: I pray you peace.
What is 'lapis,' William?

55

IV,1,1919

And what is 'a stone,' William?

56

IV,1,1921

No, it is 'lapis:' I pray you, remember in your prain.

57

IV,1,1923

That is a good William. What is he, William, that
does lend articles?

58

IV,1,1927

Nominativo, hig, hag, hog; pray you, mark:
genitivo, hujus. Well, what is your accusative case?

59

IV,1,1930

I pray you, have your remembrance, child,
accusative, hung, hang, hog.

60

IV,1,1933

Leave your prabbles, 'oman. What is the focative
case, William?

61

IV,1,1936

Remember, William; focative is caret.

62

IV,1,1938

'Oman, forbear.

63

IV,1,1940

What is your genitive case plural, William?

64

IV,1,1942

Ay.

65

IV,1,1946

For shame, 'oman.

66

IV,1,1950

'Oman, art thou lunatics? hast thou no
understandings for thy cases and the numbers of the
genders? Thou art as foolish Christian creatures as
I would desires.

67

IV,1,1955

Show me now, William, some declensions of your pronouns.

68

IV,1,1957

It is qui, quae, quod: if you forget your 'quies,'
your 'quaes,' and your 'quods,' you must be
preeches. Go your ways, and play; go.

69

IV,1,1961

He is a good sprag memory. Farewell, Mistress Page.

70

IV,2,2084

Why, this is lunatics! this is mad as a mad dog!

71

IV,2,2099

'Tis unreasonable! Will you take up your wife's
clothes? Come away.

72

IV,2,2112

Master Ford, you must pray, and not follow the
imaginations of your own heart: this is jealousies.

73

IV,2,2148

By the yea and no, I think the 'oman is a witch
indeed: I like not when a 'oman has a great peard;
I spy a great peard under his muffler.

74

IV,4,2196

'Tis one of the best discretions of a 'oman as ever
I did look upon.

75

IV,4,2215

You say he has been thrown in the rivers and has
been grievously peaten as an old 'oman: methinks
there should be terrors in him that he should not
come; methinks his flesh is punished, he shall have
no desires.

76

IV,4,2265

I will teach the children their behaviors; and I
will be like a jack-an-apes also, to burn the
knight with my taber.

77

IV,4,2280

Let us about it: it is admirable pleasures and fery
honest knaveries.

78

IV,5,2365

Where is mine host?

79

IV,5,2367

Have a care of your entertainments: there is a
friend of mine come to town tells me there is three
cozen-germans that has cozened all the hosts of
Readins, of Maidenhead, of Colebrook, of horses and
money. I tell you for good will, look you: you
are wise and full of gibes and vlouting-stocks, and
'tis not convenient you should be cozened. Fare you well.

80

V,4,2554

Trib, trib, fairies; come; and remember your parts:
be pold, I pray you; follow me into the pit; and
when I give the watch-'ords, do as I pid you:
come, come; trib, trib.

81

V,5,2614

Where's Bede? Go you, and where you find a maid
That, ere she sleep, has thrice her prayers said,
Raise up the organs of her fantasy;
Sleep she as sound as careless infancy:
But those as sleep and think not on their sins,
Pinch them, arms, legs, backs, shoulders, sides and shins.

82

V,5,2641

Pray you, lock hand in hand; yourselves in order set
And twenty glow-worms shall our lanterns be,
To guide our measure round about the tree.
But, stay; I smell a man of middle-earth.

83

V,5,2653

Come, will this wood take fire?

84

V,5,2704

Sir John Falstaff, serve Got, and leave your
desires, and fairies will not pinse you.

85

V,5,2707

And leave your jealousies too, I pray you.

86

V,5,2715

Seese is not good to give putter; your belly is all putter.

87

V,5,2730

And given to fornications, and to taverns and sack
and wine and metheglins, and to drinkings and
swearings and starings, pribbles and prabbles?

Return to the "Merry Wives of Windsor" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS