Speeches (Lines) for Silvius
in "As You Like It"

Total: 24

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,4,740

O Corin, that thou knew'st how I do love her!

2

II,4,742

No, Corin, being old, thou canst not guess,
Though in thy youth thou wast as true a lover
As ever sigh'd upon a midnight pillow.
But if thy love were ever like to mine,
As sure I think did never man love so,
How many actions most ridiculous
Hast thou been drawn to by thy fantasy?

3

II,4,750

O, thou didst then never love so heartily!
If thou rememb'rest not the slightest folly
That ever love did make thee run into,
Thou hast not lov'd;
Or if thou hast not sat as I do now,
Wearing thy hearer in thy mistress' praise,
Thou hast not lov'd;
Or if thou hast not broke from company
Abruptly, as my passion now makes me,
Thou hast not lov'd.
O Phebe, Phebe, Phebe! Exit Silvius

4

III,5,1651

Sweet Phebe, do not scorn me; do not, Phebe.
Say that you love me not; but say not so
In bitterness. The common executioner,
Whose heart th' accustom'd sight of death makes hard,
Falls not the axe upon the humbled neck
But first begs pardon. Will you sterner be
Than he that dies and lives by bloody drops?

5

III,5,1679

O dear Phebe,
If ever- as that ever may be near-
You meet in some fresh cheek the power of fancy,
Then shall you know the wounds invisible
That love's keen arrows make.

6

III,5,1736

Sweet Phebe.

7

III,5,1738

Sweet Phebe, pity me.

8

III,5,1740

Wherever sorrow is, relief would be.
If you do sorrow at my grief in love,
By giving love, your sorrow and my grief
Were both extermin'd.

9

III,5,1745

I would have you.

10

III,5,1754

So holy and so perfect is my love,
And I in such a poverty of grace,
That I shall think it a most plenteous crop
To glean the broken ears after the man
That the main harvest reaps; loose now and then
A scatt'red smile, and that I'll live upon.

11

III,5,1761

Not very well; but I have met him oft;
And he hath bought the cottage and the bounds
That the old carlot once was master of.

12

III,5,1791

Phebe, with all my heart.

13

IV,3,2007

My errand is to you, fair youth;
My gentle Phebe did bid me give you this.
I know not the contents; but, as I guess
By the stern brow and waspish action
Which she did use as she was writing of it,
It bears an angry tenour. Pardon me,
I am but as a guiltless messenger.

14

IV,3,2022

No, I protest, I know not the contents;
Phebe did write it.

15

IV,3,2032

Sure, it is hers.

16

IV,3,2039

So please you, for I never heard it yet;
Yet heard too much of Phebe's cruelty.

17

IV,3,2045

Call you this railing?

18

IV,3,2066

Call you this chiding?

19

V,2,2322

It is to be all made of sighs and tears;
And so am I for Phebe.

20

V,2,2327

It is to be all made of faith and service;
And so am I for Phebe.

21

V,2,2332

It is to be all made of fantasy,
All made of passion, and all made of wishes;
All adoration, duty, and observance,
All humbleness, all patience, and impatience,
All purity, all trial, all obedience;
And so am I for Phebe.

22

V,2,2342

If this be so, why blame you me to love you?

23

V,2,2357

I'll not fail, if I live.

24

V,4,2419

Though to have her and death were both one thing.

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