Speeches (Lines) for Rosencrantz
in "Hamlet"

Total: 48

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,2,1110

Both your Majesties
Might, by the sovereign power you have of us,
Put your dread pleasures more into command
Than to entreaty.

2

II,2,1323

[to Polonius] God save you, sir!

3

II,2,1326

My most dear lord!

4

II,2,1329

As the indifferent children of the earth.

5

II,2,1333

Neither, my lord.

6

II,2,1339

None, my lord, but that the world's grown honest.

7

II,2,1346

Then is the world one.

8

II,2,1349

We think not so, my lord.

9

II,2,1352

Why, then your ambition makes it one. 'Tis too narrow for your
mind.

10

II,2,1359

Truly, and I hold ambition of so airy and light a quality that
it is but a shadow's shadow.

11

II,2,1364

[with Guildenstern] We'll wait upon you.

12

II,2,1369

To visit you, my lord; no other occasion.

13

II,2,1379

To what end, my lord?

14

II,2,1385

[aside to Guildenstern] What say you?

15

II,2,1404

My lord, there was no such stuff in my thoughts.

16

II,2,1406

To think, my lord, if you delight not in man, what lenten
entertainment the players shall receive from you. We coted them
on the way, and hither are they coming to offer you service.

17

II,2,1416

Even those you were wont to take such delight in, the
tragedians of the city.

18

II,2,1420

I think their inhibition comes by the means of the late
innovation.

19

II,2,1424

No indeed are they not.

20

II,2,1426

Nay, their endeavour keeps in the wonted pace; but there is,
sir, an eyrie of children, little eyases, that cry out on the top
of question and are most tyrannically clapp'd for't. These are now
the fashion, and so berattle the common stages (so they call
them) that many wearing rapiers are afraid of goosequills and
dare scarce come thither.

21

II,2,1438

Faith, there has been much to do on both sides; and the nation
holds it no sin to tarre them to controversy. There was, for a
while, no money bid for argument unless the poet and the player
went to cuffs in the question.

22

II,2,1445

Ay, that they do, my lord- Hercules and his load too.

23

II,2,1467

Happily he's the second time come to them; for they say an old
man is twice a child.

24

II,2,1619

Good my lord!

25

III,1,1687

He does confess he feels himself distracted,
But from what cause he will by no means speak.

26

III,1,1694

Most like a gentleman.

27

III,1,1696

Niggard of question, but of our demands
Most free in his reply.

28

III,1,1700

Madam, it so fell out that certain players
We o'erraught on the way. Of these we told him,
And there did seem in him a kind of joy
To hear of it. They are here about the court,
And, as I think, they have already order
This night to play before him.

29

III,1,1713

We shall, my lord.

30

III,2,1927

[with Guildenstern] We will, my lord.

31

III,2,1988

Ay, my lord. They stay upon your patience.

32

III,2,2209

Then thus she says: your behaviour hath struck her into
amazement and admiration.

33

III,2,2213

She desires to speak with you in her closet ere you go to bed.

34

III,2,2216

My lord, you once did love me.

35

III,2,2218

Good my lord, what is your cause of distemper? You do surely
bar the door upon your own liberty, if you deny your griefs to
your friend.

36

III,2,2222

How can that be, when you have the voice of the King himself
for your succession in Denmark?

37

III,3,2288

The single and peculiar life is bound
With all the strength and armour of the mind
To keep itself from noyance; but much more
That spirit upon whose weal depends and rests
The lives of many. The cesse of majesty
Dies not alone, but like a gulf doth draw
What's near it with it. It is a massy wheel,
Fix'd on the summit of the highest mount,
To whose huge spokes ten thousand lesser things
Are mortis'd and adjoin'd; which when it falls,
Each small annexment, petty consequence,
Attends the boist'rous ruin. Never alone
Did the king sigh, but with a general groan.

38

III,3,2304

[with Guildenstern] We will haste us.

39

IV,2,2682

What have you done, my lord, with the dead body?

40

IV,2,2684

Tell us where 'tis, that we may take it thence
And bear it to the chapel.

41

IV,2,2687

Believe what?

42

IV,2,2691

Take you me for a sponge, my lord?

43

IV,2,2698

I understand you not, my lord.

44

IV,2,2700

My lord, you must tell us where the body is and go with us to
the King.

45

IV,3,2721

Where the dead body is bestow'd, my lord,
We cannot get from him.

46

IV,3,2724

Without, my lord; guarded, to know your pleasure.

47

IV,3,2726

Ho, Guildenstern! Bring in my lord.

48

IV,4,2818

Will't please you go, my lord?

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