Speeches (Lines) for Edward Poins
in "Henry IV, Part I"

Total: 36

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,219

Good morrow, sweet Hal. What says Monsieur Remorse?
what says Sir John Sack and Sugar? Jack! how
agrees the devil and thee about thy soul, that thou
soldest him on Good-Friday last for a cup of Madeira
and a cold capon's leg?

2

I,2,227

Then art thou damned for keeping thy word with the devil.

3

I,2,229

But, my lads, my lads, to-morrow morning, by four
o'clock, early at Gadshill! there are pilgrims going
to Canterbury with rich offerings, and traders
riding to London with fat purses: I have vizards
for you all; you have horses for yourselves:
Gadshill lies to-night in Rochester: I have bespoke
supper to-morrow night in Eastcheap: we may do it
as secure as sleep. If you will go, I will stuff
your purses full of crowns; if you will not, tarry
at home and be hanged.

4

I,2,241

You will, chops?

5

I,2,252

Sir John, I prithee, leave the prince and me alone:
I will lay him down such reasons for this adventure
that he shall go.

6

I,2,263

Now, my good sweet honey lord, ride with us
to-morrow: I have a jest to execute that I cannot
manage alone. Falstaff, Bardolph, Peto and Gadshill
shall rob those men that we have already waylaid:
yourself and I will not be there; and when they
have the booty, if you and I do not rob them, cut
this head off from my shoulders.

7

I,2,271

Why, we will set forth before or after them, and
appoint them a place of meeting, wherein it is at
our pleasure to fail, and then will they adventure
upon the exploit themselves; which they shall have
no sooner achieved, but we'll set upon them.

8

I,2,279

Tut! our horses they shall not see: I'll tie them
in the wood; our vizards we will change after we
leave them: and, sirrah, I have cases of buckram
for the nonce, to immask our noted outward garments.

9

I,2,284

Well, for two of them, I know them to be as
true-bred cowards as ever turned back; and for the
third, if he fight longer than he sees reason, I'll
forswear arms. The virtue of this jest will be, the
incomprehensible lies that this same fat rogue will
tell us when we meet at supper: how thirty, at
least, he fought with; what wards, what blows, what
extremities he endured; and in the reproof of this
lies the jest.

10

I,2,296

Farewell, my lord.

11

II,2,741

Come, shelter, shelter: I have removed Falstaff's
horse, and he frets like a gummed velvet.

12

II,2,791

O, 'tis our setter: I know his voice. Bardolph,
what news?
money of the king's coming down the hill; 'tis going
to the king's exchequer.

13

II,2,809

Sirrah Jack, thy horse stands behind the hedge:
when thou needest him, there thou shalt find him.
Farewell, and stand fast.

14

II,2,814

Here, hard by: stand close.

15

II,2,837

Stand close; I hear them coming.

16

II,2,844

Villains!
[As they are sharing, the Prince and Poins set upon
them; they all run away; and Falstaff, after a blow
or two, runs away too, leaving the booty behind them]

17

II,2,855

How the rogue roar'd!

18

II,4,987

Where hast been, Hal?

19

II,4,1019

Francis!

20

II,4,1021

Francis!

21

II,4,1029

[Within] Francis!

22

II,4,1037

[Within] Francis!

23

II,4,1041

[Within] Francis!

24

II,4,1048

[Within] Francis!

25

II,4,1062

[Within] Francis!

26

II,4,1076

Anon, anon, sir.

27

II,4,1079

As merry as crickets, my lad. But hark ye; what
cunning match have you made with this jest of the
drawer? come, what's the issue?

28

II,4,1104

Welcome, Jack: where hast thou been?

29

II,4,1132

'Zounds, ye fat paunch, an ye call me coward, by the
Lord, I'll stab thee.

30

II,4,1186

Ay, ay, he said four.

31

II,4,1192

Ay, four, in buckram suits.

32

II,4,1201

Down fell their hose.

33

II,4,1219

Come, your reason, Jack, your reason.

34

II,4,1237

Mark, Jack.

35

II,4,1251

Come, let's hear, Jack; what trick hast thou now?

36

II,4,1326

O, Glendower.

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