Speeches (Lines) for Phebe
in "As You Like It"

Total: 23

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

III,5,1659

I would not be thy executioner;
I fly thee, for I would not injure thee.
Thou tell'st me there is murder in mine eye.
'Tis pretty, sure, and very probable,
That eyes, that are the frail'st and softest things,
Who shut their coward gates on atomies,
Should be call'd tyrants, butchers, murderers!
Now I do frown on thee with all my heart;
And if mine eyes can wound, now let them kill thee.
Now counterfeit to swoon; why, now fall down;
Or, if thou canst not, O, for shame, for shame,
Lie not, to say mine eyes are murderers.
Now show the wound mine eye hath made in thee.
Scratch thee but with a pin, and there remains
Some scar of it; lean upon a rush,
The cicatrice and capable impressure
Thy palm some moment keeps; but now mine eyes,
Which I have darted at thee, hurt thee not;
Nor, I am sure, there is not force in eyes
That can do hurt.

2

III,5,1684

But till that time
Come not thou near me; and when that time comes,
Afflict me with thy mocks, pity me not;
As till that time I shall not pity thee.

3

III,5,1718

Sweet youth, I pray you chide a year together;
I had rather hear you chide than this man woo.

4

III,5,1724

For no ill will I bear you.

5

III,5,1734

Dead shepherd, now I find thy saw of might:
'Who ever lov'd that lov'd not at first sight?'

6

III,5,1737

Ha! what say'st thou, Silvius?

7

III,5,1739

Why, I am sorry for thee, gentle Silvius.

8

III,5,1744

Thou hast my love; is not that neighbourly?

9

III,5,1746

Why, that were covetousness.
Silvius, the time was that I hated thee;
And yet it is not that I bear thee love;
But since that thou canst talk of love so well,
Thy company, which erst was irksome to me,
I will endure; and I'll employ thee too.
But do not look for further recompense
Than thine own gladness that thou art employ'd.

10

III,5,1760

Know'st thou the youth that spoke to me erewhile?

11

III,5,1764

Think not I love him, though I ask for him;
'Tis but a peevish boy; yet he talks well.
But what care I for words? Yet words do well
When he that speaks them pleases those that hear.
It is a pretty youth- not very pretty;
But, sure, he's proud; and yet his pride becomes him.
He'll make a proper man. The best thing in him
Is his complexion; and faster than his tongue
Did make offence, his eye did heal it up.
He is not very tall; yet for his years he's tall;
His leg is but so-so; and yet 'tis well.
There was a pretty redness in his lip,
A little riper and more lusty red
Than that mix'd in his cheek; 'twas just the difference
Betwixt the constant red and mingled damask.
There be some women, Silvius, had they mark'd him
In parcels as I did, would have gone near
To fall in love with him; but, for my part,
I love him not, nor hate him not; and yet
I have more cause to hate him than to love him;
For what had he to do to chide at me?
He said mine eyes were black, and my hair black,
And, now I am rememb'red, scorn'd at me.
I marvel why I answer'd not again;
But that's all one: omittance is no quittance.
I'll write to him a very taunting letter,
And thou shalt bear it; wilt thou, Silvius?

12

III,5,1792

I'll write it straight;
The matter's in my head and in my heart;
I will be bitter with him and passing short.
Go with me, Silvius. Exeunt

13

V,2,2315

Youth, you have done me much ungentleness
To show the letter that I writ to you.

14

V,2,2321

Good shepherd, tell this youth what 'tis to love.

15

V,2,2324

And I for Ganymede.

16

V,2,2329

And I for Ganymede.

17

V,2,2338

And so am I for Ganymede.

18

V,2,2341

If this be so, why blame you me to love you?

19

V,2,2358

Nor I.

20

V,4,2414

That will I, should I die the hour after.

21

V,4,2417

So is the bargain.

22

V,4,2513

If sight and shape be true,
Why then, my love adieu!

23

V,4,2543

I will not eat my word, now thou art mine;
Thy faith my fancy to thee doth combine.
Enter JAQUES DE BOYS

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