Speeches (Lines) for Petruchio
in "Taming of the Shrew"

Total: 158

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,552

Verona, for a while I take my leave,
To see my friends in Padua; but of all...

2

I,2,559

Villain, I say, knock me here soundly.

3

I,2,562

Villain, I say, knock me at this gate,
And rap me well, or I'll knock your knave's pate.

4

I,2,566

Will it not be?
Faith, sirrah, an you'll not knock I'll ring it;...

5

I,2,571

Now knock when I bid you, sirrah villain!

6

I,2,575

Signior Hortensio, come you to part the fray?
'Con tutto il cuore ben trovato' may I say.

7

I,2,587

A senseless villain! Good Hortensio,
I bade the rascal knock upon your gate,...

8

I,2,593

Sirrah, be gone, or talk not, I advise you.

9

I,2,599

Such wind as scatters young men through the world
To seek their fortunes farther than at home,...

10

I,2,614

Signior Hortensio, 'twixt such friends as we
Few words suffice; and therefore, if thou know...

11

I,2,641

Hortensio, peace! thou know'st not gold's effect.
Tell me her father's name, and 'tis enough;...

12

I,2,649

I know her father, though I know not her;
And he knew my deceased father well....

13

I,2,709

Peace, sirrah!

14

I,2,736

I know she is an irksome brawling scold;
If that be all, masters, I hear no harm.

15

I,2,739

Born in Verona, old Antonio's son.
My father dead, my fortune lives for me;...

16

I,2,746

Will I live?

17

I,2,748

Why came I hither but to that intent?
Think you a little din can daunt mine ears?...

18

I,2,777

Not her that chides, sir, at any hand, I pray.

19

I,2,803

Hortensio, to what end are all these words?

20

I,2,809

Sir, sir, the first's for me; let her go by.

21

I,2,812

Sir, understand you this of me, in sooth:
The youngest daughter, whom you hearken for,...

22

II,1,883

And you, good sir! Pray, have you not a daughter
Call'd Katherina, fair and virtuous?

23

II,1,887

You wrong me, Signior Gremio; give me leave.
I am a gentleman of Verona, sir,...

24

II,1,906

I see you do not mean to part with her;
Or else you like not of my company.

25

II,1,910

Petruchio is my name, Antonio's son,
A man well known throughout all Italy.

26

II,1,916

O, pardon me, Signior Gremio! I would fain be doing.

27

II,1,957

Signior Baptista, my business asketh haste,
And every day I cannot come to woo....

28

II,1,966

And for that dowry, I'll assure her of
Her widowhood, be it that she survive me,...

29

II,1,973

Why, that is nothing; for I tell you, father,
I am as peremptory as she proud-minded;...

30

II,1,983

Ay, to the proof, as mountains are for winds,
That shake not though they blow perpetually.

31

II,1,1004

Now, by the world, it is a lusty wench;
I love her ten times more than e'er I did....

32

II,1,1012

I pray you do. Exeunt all but PETRUCHIO
I'll attend her here,...

33

II,1,1031

You lie, in faith, for you are call'd plain Kate,
And bonny Kate, and sometimes Kate the curst;...

34

II,1,1044

Why, what's a moveable?

35

II,1,1046

Thou hast hit it. Come, sit on me.

36

II,1,1048

Women are made to bear, and so are you.

37

II,1,1050

Alas, good Kate, I will not burden thee!
For, knowing thee to be but young and light-

38

II,1,1054

Should be! should- buzz!

39

II,1,1056

O, slow-wing'd turtle, shall a buzzard take thee?

40

II,1,1058

Come, come, you wasp; i' faith, you are too angry.

41

II,1,1060

My remedy is then to pluck it out.

42

II,1,1062

Who knows not where a wasp does wear his sting?
In his tail.

43

II,1,1065

Whose tongue?

44

II,1,1067

What, with my tongue in your tail? Nay, come again,
Good Kate; I am a gentleman.

45

II,1,1070

I swear I'll cuff you, if you strike again.

46

II,1,1074

A herald, Kate? O, put me in thy books!

47

II,1,1076

A combless cock, so Kate will be my hen.

48

II,1,1078

Nay, come, Kate, come; you must not look so sour.

49

II,1,1080

Why, here's no crab; and therefore look not sour.

50

II,1,1082

Then show it me.

51

II,1,1084

What, you mean my face?

52

II,1,1086

Now, by Saint George, I am too young for you.

53

II,1,1088

'Tis with cares.

54

II,1,1090

Nay, hear you, Kate- in sooth, you scape not so.

55

II,1,1092

No, not a whit; I find you passing gentle.
'Twas told me you were rough, and coy, and sullen,...

56

II,1,1108

Did ever Dian so become a grove
As Kate this chamber with her princely gait?...

57

II,1,1113

It is extempore, from my mother wit.

58

II,1,1115

Am I not wise?

59

II,1,1117

Marry, so I mean, sweet Katherine, in thy bed.
And therefore, setting all this chat aside,...

60

II,1,1133

How but well, sir? how but well?
It were impossible I should speed amiss.

61

II,1,1141

Father, 'tis thus: yourself and all the world
That talk'd of her have talk'd amiss of her....

62

II,1,1153

Be patient, gentlemen. I choose her for myself;
If she and I be pleas'd, what's that to you?...

63

II,1,1172

Father, and wife, and gentlemen, adieu.
I will to Venice; Sunday comes apace;...

64

III,2,1444

Come, where be these gallants? Who's at home?

65

III,2,1446

And yet I come not well.

66

III,2,1450

Were it better, I should rush in thus.
But where is Kate? Where is my lovely bride?...

67

III,2,1464

Tedious it were to tell, and harsh to hear;
Sufficeth I am come to keep my word,...

68

III,2,1473

Not I, believe me; thus I'll visit her.

69

III,2,1475

Good sooth, even thus; therefore ha' done with words;
To me she's married, not unto my clothes....

70

III,2,1547

Gentlemen and friends, I thank you for your pains.
I know you think to dine with me to-day,...

71

III,2,1553

I must away to-day before night come.
Make it no wonder; if you knew my business,...

72

III,2,1562

It may not be.

73

III,2,1564

It cannot be.

74

III,2,1566

I am content.

75

III,2,1568

I am content you shall entreat me stay;
But yet not stay, entreat me how you can.

76

III,2,1571

Grumio, my horse.

77

III,2,1581

O Kate, content thee; prithee be not angry.

78

III,2,1588

They shall go forward, Kate, at thy command.
Obey the bride, you that attend on her;...

79

IV,1,1719

Where be these knaves? What, no man at door
To hold my stirrup nor to take my horse!...

80

IV,1,1723

Here, sir! here, sir! here, sir! here, sir!
You logger-headed and unpolish'd grooms!...

81

IV,1,1728

YOU peasant swain! you whoreson malt-horse drudge!
Did I not bid thee meet me in the park...

82

IV,1,1738

Go, rascals, go and fetch my supper in.
[Exeunt some of the SERVINGMEN]...

83

IV,1,1761

A whoreson, beetle-headed, flap-ear'd knave!
Come, Kate, sit down; I know you have a stomach....

84

IV,1,1766

Who brought it?

85

IV,1,1768

'Tis burnt; and so is all the meat.
What dogs are these? Where is the rascal cook?...

86

IV,1,1779

I tell thee, Kate, 'twas burnt and dried away,
And I expressly am forbid to touch it;...

87

IV,1,1799

Thus have I politicly begun my reign,
And 'tis my hope to end successfully....

88

IV,3,1994

How fares my Kate? What, sweeting, all amort?

89

IV,3,1997

Pluck up thy spirits, look cheerfully upon me.
Here, love, thou seest how diligent I am,...

90

IV,3,2005

The poorest service is repaid with thanks;
And so shall mine, before you touch the meat.

91

IV,3,2010

[Aside] Eat it up all, Hortensio, if thou lovest me.-
Much good do it unto thy gentle heart!...

92

IV,3,2027

Why, this was moulded on a porringer;
A velvet dish. Fie, fie! 'tis lewd and filthy;...

93

IV,3,2034

When you are gentle, you shall have one too,
And not till then.

94

IV,3,2045

Why, thou say'st true; it is a paltry cap,
A custard-coffin, a bauble, a silken pie;...

95

IV,3,2050

Thy gown? Why, ay. Come, tailor, let us see't.
O mercy, God! what masquing stuff is here?...

96

IV,3,2060

Marry, and did; but if you be rememb'red,
I did not bid you mar it to the time....

97

IV,3,2068

Why, true; he means to make a puppet of thee.

98

IV,3,2070

O monstrous arrogance! Thou liest, thou thread, thou
thimble,...

99

IV,3,2093

Read it.

100

IV,3,2099

Proceed.

101

IV,3,2105

Ay, there's the villainy.

102

IV,3,2114

Well, sir, in brief, the gown is not for me.

103

IV,3,2116

Go, take it up unto thy master's use.

104

IV,3,2119

Why, sir, what's your conceit in that?

105

IV,3,2123

[Aside] Hortensio, say thou wilt see the tailor paid.-
Go take it hence; be gone, and say no more.

106

IV,3,2128

Well, come, my Kate; we will unto your father's
Even in these honest mean habiliments;...

107

IV,3,2150

It shall be seven ere I go to horse.
Look what I speak, or do, or think to do,...

108

IV,5,2267

Come on, a God's name; once more toward our father's.
Good Lord, how bright and goodly shines the moon!

109

IV,5,2270

I say it is the moon that shines so bright.

110

IV,5,2272

Now by my mother's son, and that's myself,
It shall be moon, or star, or what I list,...

111

IV,5,2282

I say it is the moon.

112

IV,5,2284

Nay, then you lie; it is the blessed sun.

113

IV,5,2291

Well, forward, forward! thus the bowl should run,
And not unluckily against the bias....

114

IV,5,2309

Why, how now, Kate, I hope thou art not mad!
This is a man, old, wrinkled, faded, withered,...

115

IV,5,2317

Do, good old grandsire, and withal make known
Which way thou travellest- if along with us,...

116

IV,5,2325

What is his name?

117

IV,5,2327

Happily met; the happier for thy son.
And now by law, as well as reverend age,...

118

IV,5,2343

Come, go along, and see the truth hereof;
For our first merriment hath made thee jealous.

119

V,1,2358

Sir, here's the door; this is Lucentio's house;
My father's bears more toward the market-place;...

120

V,1,2373

Nay, I told you your son was well beloved in Padua. Do
you hear, sir? To leave frivolous circumstances, I pray you tell...

121

V,1,2381

[To VINCENTIO] Why, how now, gentleman!
Why, this is flat knavery to take upon you another man's name.

122

V,1,2402

Prithee, Kate, let's stand aside and see the end of this
controversy. [They stand aside]...

123

V,1,2480

First kiss me, Kate, and we will.

124

V,1,2482

What, art thou asham'd of me?

125

V,1,2484

Why, then, let's home again. Come, sirrah, let's away.

126

V,1,2486

Is not this well? Come, my sweet Kate:
Better once than never, for never too late. Exeunt

127

V,2,2500

Nothing but sit and sit, and eat and eat!

128

V,2,2502

Padua affords nothing but what is kind.

129

V,2,2504

Now, for my life, Hortensio fears his widow.

130

V,2,2506

YOU are very sensible, and yet you miss my sense:
I mean Hortensio is afeard of you.

131

V,2,2509

Roundly replied.

132

V,2,2512

Conceives by me! How likes Hortensio that?

133

V,2,2514

Very well mended. Kiss him for that, good widow.

134

V,2,2523

To her, Kate!

135

V,2,2525

A hundred marks, my Kate does put her down.

136

V,2,2527

Spoke like an officer- ha' to thee, lad.

137

V,2,2535

Nay, that you shall not; since you have begun,
Have at you for a bitter jest or two.

138

V,2,2541

She hath prevented me. Here, Signior Tranio,
This bird you aim'd at, though you hit her not;...

139

V,2,2546

A good swift simile, but something currish.

140

V,2,2552

'A has a little gall'd me, I confess;
And, as the jest did glance away from me,...

141

V,2,2557

Well, I say no; and therefore, for assurance,
Let's each one send unto his wife,...

142

V,2,2564

Twenty crowns?
I'll venture so much of my hawk or hound,...

143

V,2,2569

A match! 'tis done.

144

V,2,2580

How! She's busy, and she cannot come!
Is that an answer?

145

V,2,2584

I hope better.

146

V,2,2587

O, ho! entreat her!
Nay, then she must needs come.

147

V,2,2595

Worse and worse; she will not come! O vile,
Intolerable, not to be endur'd!...

148

V,2,2600

What?

149

V,2,2602

The fouler fortune mine, and there an end.

150

V,2,2606

Where is your sister, and Hortensio's wife?

151

V,2,2608

Go, fetch them hither; if they deny to come.
Swinge me them soundly forth unto their husbands....

152

V,2,2614

Marry, peace it bodes, and love, and quiet life,
An awful rule, and right supremacy;...

153

V,2,2622

Nay, I will win my wager better yet,
And show more sign of her obedience,...

154

V,2,2638

Katherine, I charge thee, tell these headstrong women
What duty they do owe their lords and husbands.

155

V,2,2641

Come on, I say; and first begin with her.

156

V,2,2643

I say she shall. And first begin with her.

157

V,2,2688

Why, there's a wench! Come on, and kiss me, Kate.

158

V,2,2692

Come, Kate, we'll to bed.
We three are married, but you two are sped....

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