Speeches (Lines) for Othello
in "Othello"

Total: 274

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,208

'Tis better as it is.

2

I,2,221

Let him do his spite:
My services which I have done the signiory...

3

I,2,235

Not I. I must be found:
My parts, my title and my perfect soul...

4

I,2,240

The servants of the duke, and my lieutenant.
The goodness of the night upon you, friends!...

5

I,2,246

What is the matter, think you?

6

I,2,257

'Tis well I am found by you.
I will but spend a word here in the house,...

7

I,2,269

Have with you.

8

I,2,274

Holla! stand there!

9

I,2,279

Keep up your bright swords, for the dew will rust them.
Good signior, you shall more command with years...

10

I,2,302

Hold your hands,
Both you of my inclining, and the rest:...

11

I,2,310

What if I do obey?
How may the duke be therewith satisfied,...

12

I,3,416

Most potent, grave, and reverend signiors,
My very noble and approved good masters,...

13

I,3,457

I do beseech you,
Send for the lady to the Sagittary,...

14

I,3,465

Ancient, conduct them: you best know the place.
[Exeunt IAGO and Attendants]...

15

I,3,473

Her father loved me; oft invited me;
Still question'd me the story of my life,...

16

I,3,578

The tyrant custom, most grave senators,
Hath made the flinty and steel couch of war...

17

I,3,592

Nor I.

18

I,3,612

Let her have your voices.
Vouch with me, heaven, I therefore beg it not,...

19

I,3,631

With all my heart.

20

I,3,637

So please your grace, my ancient;
A man he is of honest and trust:...

21

I,3,652

My life upon her faith! Honest Iago,
My Desdemona must I leave to thee:...

22

II,1,972

O my fair warrior!

23

II,1,974

It gives me wonder great as my content
To see you here before me. O my soul's joy!...

24

II,1,988

Amen to that, sweet powers!
I cannot speak enough of this content;...

25

II,1,997

Come, let us to the castle.
News, friends; our wars are done, the Turks...

26

II,3,1130

Good Michael, look you to the guard to-night:
Let's teach ourselves that honourable stop,...

27

II,3,1136

Iago is most honest.
Michael, good night: to-morrow with your earliest...

28

II,3,1308

What is the matter here?

29

II,3,1311

Hold, for your lives!

30

II,3,1315

Why, how now, ho! from whence ariseth this?
Are we turn'd Turks, and to ourselves do that...

31

II,3,1334

How comes it, Michael, you are thus forgot?

32

II,3,1336

Worthy Montano, you were wont be civil;
The gravity and stillness of your youth...

33

II,3,1352

Now, by heaven,
My blood begins my safer guides to rule;...

34

II,3,1396

I know, Iago,
Thy honesty and love doth mince this matter,...

35

II,3,1404

All's well now, sweeting; come away to bed.
Sir, for your hurts, myself will be your surgeon:...

36

III,2,1617

These letters give, Iago, to the pilot;
And by him do my duties to the senate:...

37

III,2,1622

This fortification, gentlemen, shall we see't?

38

III,3,1665

What dost thou say?

39

III,3,1667

Was not that Cassio parted from my wife?

40

III,3,1671

I do believe 'twas he.

41

III,3,1675

Who is't you mean?

42

III,3,1683

Went he hence now?

43

III,3,1687

Not now, sweet Desdemona; some other time.

44

III,3,1689

The sooner, sweet, for you.

45

III,3,1691

No, not to-night.

46

III,3,1693

I shall not dine at home;
I meet the captains at the citadel.

47

III,3,1710

Prithee, no more: let him come when he will;
I will deny thee nothing.

48

III,3,1720

I will deny thee nothing:
Whereon, I do beseech thee, grant me this,...

49

III,3,1724

Farewell, my Desdemona: I'll come to thee straight.

50

III,3,1728

Excellent wretch! Perdition catch my soul,
But I do love thee! and when I love thee not,...

51

III,3,1732

What dost thou say, Iago?

52

III,3,1735

He did, from first to last: why dost thou ask?

53

III,3,1738

Why of thy thought, Iago?

54

III,3,1740

O, yes; and went between us very oft.

55

III,3,1742

Indeed! ay, indeed: discern'st thou aught in that?
Is he not honest?

56

III,3,1745

Honest! ay, honest.

57

III,3,1747

What dost thou think?

58

III,3,1749

Think, my lord!
By heaven, he echoes me,...

59

III,3,1762

I think thou dost;
And, for I know thou'rt full of love and honesty,...

60

III,3,1772

I think so too.

61

III,3,1775

Certain, men should be what they seem.

62

III,3,1777

Nay, yet there's more in this:
I prithee, speak to me as to thy thinkings,...

63

III,3,1790

Thou dost conspire against thy friend, Iago,
If thou but think'st him wrong'd and makest his ear...

64

III,3,1804

What dost thou mean?

65

III,3,1812

By heaven, I'll know thy thoughts.

66

III,3,1815

Ha!

67

III,3,1822

O misery!

68

III,3,1828

Why, why is this?
Think'st thou I'ld make a lie of jealousy,...

69

III,3,1857

Dost thou say so?

70

III,3,1861

And so she did.

71

III,3,1868

I am bound to thee for ever.

72

III,3,1870

Not a jot, not a jot.

73

III,3,1877

I will not.

74

III,3,1882

No, not much moved:
I do not think but Desdemona's honest.

75

III,3,1885

And yet, how nature erring from itself,—

76

III,3,1897

Farewell, farewell:
If more thou dost perceive, let me know more;...

77

III,3,1901

Why did I marry? This honest creature doubtless
Sees and knows more, much more, than he unfolds.

78

III,3,1916

Fear not my government.

79

III,3,1919

This fellow's of exceeding honesty,
And knows all qualities, with a learned spirit,...

80

III,3,1945

I am to blame.

81

III,3,1948

I have a pain upon my forehead here.

82

III,3,1952

Your napkin is too little:
[He puts the handkerchief from him; and it drops]...

83

III,3,2009

Ha! ha! false to me?

84

III,3,2011

Avaunt! be gone! thou hast set me on the rack:
I swear 'tis better to be much abused...

85

III,3,2015

What sense had I of her stol'n hours of lust?
I saw't not, thought it not, it harm'd not me:...

86

III,3,2022

I had been happy, if the general camp,
Pioners and all, had tasted her sweet body,...

87

III,3,2036

Villain, be sure thou prove my love a whore,
Be sure of it; give me the ocular proof:...

88

III,3,2042

Make me to see't; or, at the least, so prove it,
That the probation bear no hinge nor loop...

89

III,3,2046

If thou dost slander her and torture me,
Never pray more; abandon all remorse;...

90

III,3,2060

Nay, stay: thou shouldst be honest.

91

III,3,2063

By the world,
I think my wife be honest and think she is not;...

92

III,3,2074

Would! nay, I will.

93

III,3,2078

Death and damnation! O!

94

III,3,2091

Give me a living reason she's disloyal.

95

III,3,2109

O monstrous! monstrous!

96

III,3,2111

But this denoted a foregone conclusion:
'Tis a shrewd doubt, though it be but a dream.

97

III,3,2115

I'll tear her all to pieces.

98

III,3,2120

I gave her such a one; 'twas my first gift.

99

III,3,2124

If it be that—

100

III,3,2127

O, that the slave had forty thousand lives!
One is too poor, too weak for my revenge....

101

III,3,2137

O, blood, blood, blood!

102

III,3,2139

Never, Iago: Like to the Pontic sea,
Whose icy current and compulsive course...

103

III,3,2160

I greet thy love,
Not with vain thanks, but with acceptance bounteous,...

104

III,3,2167

Damn her, lewd minx! O, damn her!
Come, go with me apart; I will withdraw,...

105

III,4,2208

Well, my good lady.
[Aside]...

106

III,4,2213

Give me your hand: this hand is moist, my lady.

107

III,4,2215

This argues fruitfulness and liberal heart:
Hot, hot, and moist: this hand of yours requires...

108

III,4,2224

A liberal hand: the hearts of old gave hands;
But our new heraldry is hands, not hearts.

109

III,4,2227

What promise, chuck?

110

III,4,2229

I have a salt and sorry rheum offends me;
Lend me thy handkerchief.

111

III,4,2232

That which I gave you.

112

III,4,2234

Not?

113

III,4,2236

That is a fault.
That handkerchief...

114

III,4,2253

'Tis true: there's magic in the web of it:
A sibyl, that had number'd in the world...

115

III,4,2261

Most veritable; therefore look to't well.

116

III,4,2263

Ha! wherefore?

117

III,4,2265

Is't lost? is't gone? speak, is it out
o' the way?

118

III,4,2268

Say you?

119

III,4,2270

How!

120

III,4,2272

Fetch't, let me see't.

121

III,4,2276

Fetch me the handkerchief: my mind misgives.

122

III,4,2279

The handkerchief!

123

III,4,2281

The handkerchief!

124

III,4,2285

The handkerchief!

125

III,4,2287

Away!

126

IV,1,2410

Think so, Iago!

127

IV,1,2413

An unauthorized kiss.

128

IV,1,2416

Naked in bed, Iago, and not mean harm!
It is hypocrisy against the devil:...

129

IV,1,2422

What then?

130

IV,1,2425

She is protectress of her honour too:
May she give that?

131

IV,1,2430

By heaven, I would most gladly have forgot it.
Thou said'st, it comes o'er my memory,...

132

IV,1,2435

That's not so good now.

133

IV,1,2443

Hath he said any thing?

134

IV,1,2446

What hath he said?

135

IV,1,2448

What? what?

136

IV,1,2450

With her?

137

IV,1,2452

Lie with her! lie on her! We say lie on her, when
they belie her. Lie with her! that's fulsome....

138

IV,1,2482

Dost thou mock me?

139

IV,1,2485

A horned man's a monster and a beast.

140

IV,1,2488

Did he confess it?

141

IV,1,2498

O, thou art wise; 'tis certain.

142

IV,1,2515

Dost thou hear, Iago?
I will be found most cunning in my patience;...

143

IV,1,2540

Look, how he laughs already!

144

IV,1,2543

Now he denies it faintly, and laughs it out.

145

IV,1,2545

Now he importunes him
To tell it o'er: go to; well said, well said.

146

IV,1,2550

Do you triumph, Roman? do you triumph?

147

IV,1,2554

So, so, so, so: they laugh that win.

148

IV,1,2558

Have you scored me? Well.

149

IV,1,2562

Iago beckons me; now he begins the story.

150

IV,1,2567

Crying 'O dear Cassio!' as it were: his gesture
imports it.

151

IV,1,2571

Now he tells how she plucked him to my chamber. O,
I see that nose of yours, but not that dog I shall...

152

IV,1,2588

By heaven, that should be my handkerchief!

153

IV,1,2601

[Advancing] How shall I murder him, Iago?

154

IV,1,2603

O Iago!

155

IV,1,2605

Was that mine?

156

IV,1,2609

I would have him nine years a-killing.
A fine woman! a fair woman! a sweet woman!

157

IV,1,2612

Ay, let her rot, and perish, and be damned to-night;
for she shall not live: no, my heart is turned to...

158

IV,1,2618

Hang her! I do but say what she is: so delicate
with her needle: an admirable musician: O! she...

159

IV,1,2623

O, a thousand thousand times: and then, of so
gentle a condition!

160

IV,1,2626

Nay, that's certain: but yet the pity of it, Iago!
O Iago, the pity of it, Iago!

161

IV,1,2631

I will chop her into messes: cuckold me!

162

IV,1,2633

With mine officer!

163

IV,1,2635

Get me some poison, Iago; this night: I'll not
expostulate with her, lest her body and beauty...

164

IV,1,2640

Good, good: the justice of it pleases: very good.

165

IV,1,2643

Excellent good.
[A trumpet within]...

166

IV,1,2650

With all my heart, sir.

167

IV,1,2653

I kiss the instrument of their pleasures.

168

IV,1,2662

Are you sure of that?

169

IV,1,2664

[Reads] 'This fail you not to do, as you will—'

170

IV,1,2669

Fire and brimstone!

171

IV,1,2671

Are you wise?

172

IV,1,2677

Indeed!

173

IV,1,2679

I am glad to see you mad.

174

IV,1,2681

[Striking her] Devil!

175

IV,1,2686

O devil, devil!
If that the earth could teem with woman's tears,...

176

IV,1,2694

Mistress!

177

IV,1,2696

What would you with her, sir?

178

IV,1,2698

Ay; you did wish that I would make her turn:
Sir, she can turn, and turn, and yet go on,...

179

IV,2,2737

You have seen nothing then?

180

IV,2,2739

Yes, you have seen Cassio and she together.

181

IV,2,2742

What, did they never whisper?

182

IV,2,2744

Nor send you out o' the way?

183

IV,2,2746

To fetch her fan, her gloves, her mask, nor nothing?

184

IV,2,2748

That's strange.

185

IV,2,2757

Bid her come hither: go.
[Exit EMILIA]...

186

IV,2,2765

Pray, chuck, come hither.

187

IV,2,2767

Let me see your eyes;
Look in my face.

188

IV,2,2770

[To EMILIA] Some of your function, mistress;
Leave procreants alone and shut the door;...

189

IV,2,2778

Why, what art thou?

190

IV,2,2781

Come, swear it, damn thyself
Lest, being like one of heaven, the devils themselves...

191

IV,2,2786

Heaven truly knows that thou art false as hell.

192

IV,2,2788

O Desdemona! away! away! away!

193

IV,2,2795

Had it pleased heaven
To try me with affliction; had they rain'd...

194

IV,2,2814

O, ay; as summer flies are in the shambles,
That quicken even with blowing. O thou weed,...

195

IV,2,2820

Was this fair paper, this most goodly book,
Made to write 'whore' upon? What committed!...

196

IV,2,2832

Are you not a strumpet?

197

IV,2,2837

What, not a whore?

198

IV,2,2839

Is't possible?

199

IV,2,2841

I cry you mercy, then:
I took you for that cunning whore of Venice...

200

IV,3,3020

O, pardon me: 'twill do me good to walk.

201

IV,3,3023

Will you walk, sir?
O,—Desdemona,—

202

IV,3,3026

Get you to bed on the instant; I will be returned
forthwith: dismiss your attendant there: look it be done.

203

V,1,3171

The voice of Cassio: Iago keeps his word.

204

V,1,3173

It is even so.

205

V,1,3175

'Tis he:—O brave Iago, honest and just,
That hast such noble sense of thy friend's wrong!...

206

V,2,3302

It is the cause, it is the cause, my soul,—
Let me not name it to you, you chaste stars!—...

207

V,2,3326

Ay. Desdemona.

208

V,2,3328

Have you pray'd to-night, Desdemona?

209

V,2,3330

If you bethink yourself of any crime
Unreconciled as yet to heaven and grace,...

210

V,2,3334

Well, do it, and be brief; I will walk by:
I would not kill thy unprepared spirit;...

211

V,2,3338

Ay, I do.

212

V,2,3341

Amen, with all my heart!

213

V,2,3343

Hum!

214

V,2,3347

Think on thy sins.

215

V,2,3349

Ay, and for that thou diest.

216

V,2,3355

Peace, and be still!

217

V,2,3357

That handkerchief which I so loved and gave thee
Thou gavest to Cassio.

218

V,2,3361

Sweet soul, take heed,
Take heed of perjury; thou art on thy deathbed.

219

V,2,3364

Yes, presently:
Therefore confess thee freely of thy sin;...

220

V,2,3370

I say, amen.

221

V,2,3375

By heaven, I saw my handkerchief in's hand.
O perjured woman! thou dost stone my heart,...

222

V,2,3383

He hath confess'd.

223

V,2,3385

That he hath used thee.

224

V,2,3387

Ay.

225

V,2,3389

No, his mouth is stopp'd;
Honest Iago hath ta'en order for't.

226

V,2,3392

Had all his hairs been lives, my great revenge
Had stomach for them all.

227

V,2,3395

Out, strumpet! weep'st thou for him to my face?

228

V,2,3397

Down, strumpet!

229

V,2,3399

Nay, if you strive—

230

V,2,3401

Being done, there is no pause.

231

V,2,3403

It is too late.

232

V,2,3406

What noise is this? Not dead? not yet quite dead?
I that am cruel am yet merciful;...

233

V,2,3410

Who's there?

234

V,2,3412

Yes: 'tis Emilia. By and by. She's dead.
'Tis like she comes to speak of Cassio's death.—...

235

V,2,3425

I had forgot thee: O, come in, Emilia;
Soft; by and by. Let me the curtains draw....

236

V,2,3432

What, now?

237

V,2,3434

It is the very error of the moon;
She comes more nearer earth than she was wont,...

238

V,2,3439

Roderigo kill'd!
And Cassio kill'd!

239

V,2,3442

Not Cassio kill'd! then murder's out of tune,
And sweet revenge grows harsh.

240

V,2,3446

That! what?

241

V,2,3455

Why, how should she be murder'd?

242

V,2,3457

You heard her say herself, it was not I.

243

V,2,3459

She's, like a liar, gone to burning hell:
'Twas I that kill'd her.

244

V,2,3463

She turn'd to folly, and she was a whore.

245

V,2,3465

She was false as water.

246

V,2,3468

Cassio did top her; ask thy husband else.
O, I were damn'd beneath all depth in hell,...

247

V,2,3473

Thy husband.

248

V,2,3475

Ay, with Cassio. Nay, had she been true,
If heaven would make me such another world...

249

V,2,3480

Ay, 'twas he that told me first:
An honest man he is, and hates the slime...

250

V,2,3484

What needs this iteration, woman? I say thy husband.

251

V,2,3487

He, woman;
I say thy husband: dost understand the word?...

252

V,2,3493

Ha!

253

V,2,3497

Peace, you were best.

254

V,2,3525

Nay, stare not, masters: it is true, indeed.

255

V,2,3536

O! O! O!

256

V,2,3541

[Rising] O, she was foul!
I scarce did know you, uncle: there lies your niece,...

257

V,2,3551

'Tis pitiful; but yet Iago knows
That she with Cassio hath the act of shame...

258

V,2,3582

Are there no stones in heaven
But what serve for the thunder?—Precious villain!

259

V,2,3594

I am not valiant neither,
But ever puny whipster gets my sword:...

260

V,2,3607

I have another weapon in this chamber;
It is a sword of Spain, the ice-brook's temper:—...

261

V,2,3612

Look in upon me then and speak with me,
Or, naked as I am, I will assault thee.

262

V,2,3616

Behold, I have a weapon;
A better never did itself sustain...

263

V,2,3643

That's he that was Othello: here I am.

264

V,2,3645

I look down towards his feet; but that's a fable.
If that thou best a devil, I cannot kill thee.

265

V,2,3650

I am not sorry neither: I'ld have thee live;
For, in my sense, 'tis happiness to die.

266

V,2,3655

Why, any thing:
An honourable murderer, if you will;...

267

V,2,3660

Ay.

268

V,2,3662

I do believe it, and I ask your pardon.
Will you, I pray, demand that demi-devil...

269

V,2,3669

Well, thou dost best.

270

V,2,3676

O villain!

271

V,2,3683

O the pernicious caitiff!
How came you, Cassio, by that handkerchief...

272

V,2,3690

O fool! fool! fool!

273

V,2,3705

Soft you; a word or two before you go.
I have done the state some service, and they know't....

274

V,2,3727

I kiss'd thee ere I kill'd thee: no way but this;
Killing myself, to die upon a kiss.

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