Speeches (Lines) for Orlando
in "As You Like It"

Total: 120

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,2

As I remember, Adam, it was upon this fashion bequeathed
me by will but poor a thousand crowns, and, as thou say'st,...

2

I,1,24

Go apart, Adam, and thou shalt hear how he will shake me
up.

3

I,1,28

Nothing; I am not taught to make any thing.

4

I,1,30

Marry, sir, I am helping you to mar that which God made, a
poor unworthy brother of yours, with idleness.

5

I,1,33

Shall I keep your hogs, and eat husks with them? What
prodigal portion have I spent that I should come to such penury?

6

I,1,36

O, sir, very well; here in your orchard.

7

I,1,38

Ay, better than him I am before knows me. I know you are
my eldest brother; and in the gentle condition of blood, you...

8

I,1,46

Come, come, elder brother, you are too young in this.

9

I,1,48

I am no villain; I am the youngest son of Sir Rowland de
Boys. He was my father; and he is thrice a villain that says such...

10

I,1,56

I will not, till I please; you shall hear me. My father
charg'd you in his will to give me good education: you have...

11

I,1,67

I no further offend you than becomes me for my good.

12

I,2,284

I attend them with all respect and duty.

13

I,2,286

No, fair Princess; he is the general challenger. I come
but in, as others do, to try with him the strength of my youth.

14

I,2,297

I beseech you, punish me not with your hard thoughts,
wherein I confess me much guilty to deny so fair and excellent...

15

I,2,313

Ready, sir; but his will hath in it a more modest working.

16

I,2,317

You mean to mock me after; you should not have mock'd me
before; but come your ways.

17

I,2,327

Yes, I beseech your Grace; I am not yet well breath'd.

18

I,2,331

Orlando, my liege; the youngest son of Sir Rowland de
Boys.

19

I,2,342

I am more proud to be Sir Rowland's son,
His youngest son- and would not change that calling...

20

I,2,362

Can I not say 'I thank you'? My better parts
Are all thrown down; and that which here stands up...

21

I,2,372

What passion hangs these weights upon my tongue?
I cannot speak to her, yet she urg'd conference....

22

I,2,384

I thank you, sir; and pray you tell me this:
Which of the two was daughter of the Duke...

23

I,2,402

I rest much bounden to you; fare you well.
[Exit LE BEAU]...

24

II,3,644

Who's there?

25

II,3,659

Why, what's the matter?

26

II,3,673

Why, whither, Adam, wouldst thou have me go?

27

II,3,675

What, wouldst thou have me go and beg my food,
Or with a base and boist'rous sword enforce...

28

II,3,700

O good old man, how well in thee appears
The constant service of the antique world,...

29

II,6,881

Why, how now, Adam! No greater heart in thee? Live a
little; comfort a little; cheer thyself a little. If this uncouth...

30

II,7,984

Forbear, and eat no more.

31

II,7,986

Nor shalt not, till necessity be serv'd.

32

II,7,991

You touch'd my vein at first: the thorny point
Of bare distress hath ta'en from me the show...

33

II,7,1000

I almost die for food, and let me have it.

34

II,7,1002

Speak you so gently? Pardon me, I pray you;
I thought that all things had been savage here,...

35

II,7,1023

Then but forbear your food a little while,
Whiles, like a doe, I go to find my fawn,...

36

II,7,1032

I thank ye; and be blest for your good comfort! Exit

37

II,7,1068

I thank you most for him.

38

III,2,1122

Hang there, my verse, in witness of my love;
And thou, thrice-crowned Queen of Night, survey...

39

III,2,1355

And so had I; but yet, for fashion sake, I thank you too
for your society.

40

III,2,1358

I do desire we may be better strangers.

41

III,2,1361

I pray you mar no more of my verses with reading them
ill-favouredly.

42

III,2,1364

Yes, just.

43

III,2,1366

There was no thought of pleasing you when she was
christen'd.

44

III,2,1369

Just as high as my heart.

45

III,2,1372

Not so; but I answer you right painted cloth, from whence
you have studied your questions.

46

III,2,1377

I will chide no breather in the world but myself, against
whom I know most faults.

47

III,2,1380

'Tis a fault I will not change for your best virtue. I am
weary of you.

48

III,2,1383

He is drown'd in the brook; look but in, and you shall see
him.

49

III,2,1386

Which I take to be either a fool or a cipher.

50

III,2,1388

I am glad of your departure; adieu, good Monsieur
Melancholy.

51

III,2,1394

Very well; what would you?

52

III,2,1396

You should ask me what time o' day; there's no clock in
the forest.

53

III,2,1401

And why not the swift foot of Time? Had not that been as
proper?

54

III,2,1407

I prithee, who doth he trot withal?

55

III,2,1412

Who ambles Time withal?

56

III,2,1419

Who doth he gallop withal?

57

III,2,1422

Who stays it still withal?

58

III,2,1425

Where dwell you, pretty youth?

59

III,2,1428

Are you native of this place?

60

III,2,1430

Your accent is something finer than you could purchase in
so removed a dwelling.

61

III,2,1438

Can you remember any of the principal evils that he laid
to the charge of women?

62

III,2,1443

I prithee recount some of them.

63

III,2,1451

I am he that is so love-shak'd; I pray you tell me your
remedy.

64

III,2,1456

What were his marks?

65

III,2,1466

Fair youth, I would I could make thee believe I love.

66

III,2,1472

I swear to thee, youth, by the white hand of Rosalind, I
am that he, that unfortunate he.

67

III,2,1475

Neither rhyme nor reason can express how much.

68

III,2,1481

Did you ever cure any so?

69

III,2,1496

I would not be cured, youth.

70

III,2,1499

Now, by the faith of my love, I will. Tell me where it is.

71

III,2,1502

With all my heart, good youth.

72

IV,1,1824

Good day, and happiness, dear Rosalind!

73

IV,1,1833

My fair Rosalind, I come within an hour of my promise.

74

IV,1,1839

Pardon me, dear Rosalind.

75

IV,1,1842

Of a snail!

76

IV,1,1846

What's that?

77

IV,1,1850

Virtue is no horn-maker; and my Rosalind is virtuous.

78

IV,1,1857

I would kiss before I spoke.

79

IV,1,1863

How if the kiss be denied?

80

IV,1,1866

Who could be out, being before his beloved mistress?

81

IV,1,1869

What, of my suit?

82

IV,1,1872

I take some joy to say you are, because I would be talking
of her.

83

IV,1,1875

Then, in mine own person, I die.

84

IV,1,1888

I would not have my right Rosalind of this mind; for, I
protest, her frown might kill me.

85

IV,1,1893

Then love me, Rosalind.

86

IV,1,1895

And wilt thou have me?

87

IV,1,1897

What sayest thou?

88

IV,1,1899

I hope so.

89

IV,1,1903

Pray thee, marry us.

90

IV,1,1907

I will.

91

IV,1,1909

Why, now; as fast as she can marry us.

92

IV,1,1911

I take thee, Rosalind, for wife.

93

IV,1,1915

So do all thoughts; they are wing'd.

94

IV,1,1918

For ever and a day.

95

IV,1,1928

But will my Rosalind do so?

96

IV,1,1930

O, but she is wise.

97

IV,1,1935

A man that had a wife with such a wit, he might say 'Wit,
whither wilt?'

98

IV,1,1939

And what wit could wit have to excuse that?

99

IV,1,1945

For these two hours, Rosalind, I will leave thee.

100

IV,1,1947

I must attend the Duke at dinner; by two o'clock I will be
with thee again.

101

IV,1,1953

Ay, sweet Rosalind.

102

IV,1,1961

With no less religion than if thou wert indeed my
Rosalind; so, adieu.

103

V,2,2249

Is't possible that on so little acquaintance you should
like her? that but seeing you should love her? and loving woo?...

104

V,2,2260

You have my consent. Let your wedding be to-morrow.
Thither will I invite the Duke and all's contented followers. Go...

105

V,2,2268

It is my arm.

106

V,2,2271

Wounded it is, but with the eyes of a lady.

107

V,2,2274

Ay, and greater wonders than that.

108

V,2,2285

They shall be married to-morrow; and I will bid the Duke
to the nuptial. But, O, how bitter a thing it is to look into...

109

V,2,2292

I can live no longer by thinking.

110

V,2,2308

Speak'st thou in sober meanings?

111

V,2,2325

And I for Rosalind.

112

V,2,2330

And I for Rosalind.

113

V,2,2339

And so am I for Rosalind.

114

V,2,2343

If this be so, why blame you me to love you?

115

V,2,2345

To her that is not here, nor doth not hear.

116

V,2,2359

Nor I. Exeunt

117

V,4,2404

I sometimes do believe and sometimes do not:
As those that fear they hope, and know they fear.

118

V,4,2412

That would I, were I of all kingdoms king.

119

V,4,2431

My lord, the first time that I ever saw him
Methought he was a brother to your daughter....

120

V,4,2512

If there be truth in sight, you are my Rosalind.

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