Speeches (Lines) for Ophelia
in "Hamlet"

Total: 58

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,486

Do you doubt that?

2

I,3,493

No more but so?

3

I,3,529

I shall th' effect of this good lesson keep
As watchman to my heart. But, good my brother,
Do not as some ungracious pastors do,
Show me the steep and thorny way to heaven,
Whiles, like a puff'd and reckless libertine,
Himself the primrose path of dalliance treads
And recks not his own rede.

4

I,3,572

'Tis in my memory lock'd,
And you yourself shall keep the key of it.

5

I,3,576

So please you, something touching the Lord Hamlet.

6

I,3,586

He hath, my lord, of late made many tenders
Of his affection to me.

7

I,3,591

I do not know, my lord, what I should think,

8

I,3,597

My lord, he hath importun'd me with love
In honourable fashion.

9

I,3,600

And hath given countenance to his speech, my lord,
With almost all the holy vows of heaven.

10

I,3,623

I shall obey, my lord.

11

II,1,1032

O my lord, my lord, I have been so affrighted!

12

II,1,1034

My lord, as I was sewing in my closet,
Lord Hamlet, with his doublet all unbrac'd,
No hat upon his head, his stockings foul'd,
Ungart'red, and down-gyved to his ankle;
Pale as his shirt, his knees knocking each other,
And with a look so piteous in purport
As if he had been loosed out of hell
To speak of horrors- he comes before me.

13

II,1,1043

My lord, I do not know,
But truly I do fear it.

14

II,1,1046

He took me by the wrist and held me hard;
Then goes he to the length of all his arm,
And, with his other hand thus o'er his brow,
He falls to such perusal of my face
As he would draw it. Long stay'd he so.
At last, a little shaking of mine arm,
And thrice his head thus waving up and down,
He rais'd a sigh so piteous and profound
As it did seem to shatter all his bulk
And end his being. That done, he lets me go,
And with his head over his shoulder turn'd
He seem'd to find his way without his eyes,
For out o' doors he went without their help
And to the last bended their light on me.

15

II,1,1067

No, my good lord; but, as you did command,
I did repel his letters and denied
His access to me.

16

III,1,1731

Madam, I wish it may.

17

III,1,1784

Good my lord,
How does your honour for this many a day?

18

III,1,1787

My lord, I have remembrances of yours
That I have longed long to re-deliver.
I pray you, now receive them.

19

III,1,1792

My honour'd lord, you know right well you did,
And with them words of so sweet breath compos'd
As made the things more rich. Their perfume lost,
Take these again; for to the noble mind
Rich gifts wax poor when givers prove unkind.
There, my lord.

20

III,1,1799

My lord?

21

III,1,1801

What means your lordship?

22

III,1,1804

Could beauty, my lord, have better commerce than with honesty?

23

III,1,1809

Indeed, my lord, you made me believe so.

24

III,1,1813

I was the more deceived.

25

III,1,1823

At home, my lord.

26

III,1,1826

O, help him, you sweet heavens!

27

III,1,1833

O heavenly powers, restore him!

28

III,1,1841

O, what a noble mind is here o'erthrown!
The courtier's, scholar's, soldier's, eye, tongue, sword,
Th' expectancy and rose of the fair state,
The glass of fashion and the mould of form,
Th' observ'd of all observers- quite, quite down!
And I, of ladies most deject and wretched,
That suck'd the honey of his music vows,
Now see that noble and most sovereign reason,
Like sweet bells jangled, out of tune and harsh;
That unmatch'd form and feature of blown youth
Blasted with ecstasy. O, woe is me
T' have seen what I have seen, see what I see!

29

III,2,1994

No, my lord.

30

III,2,1996

Ay, my lord.

31

III,2,1998

I think nothing, my lord.

32

III,2,2000

What is, my lord?

33

III,2,2002

You are merry, my lord.

34

III,2,2004

Ay, my lord.

35

III,2,2008

Nay 'tis twice two months, my lord.

36

III,2,2029

What means this, my lord?

37

III,2,2031

Belike this show imports the argument of the play.

38

III,2,2035

Will he tell us what this show meant?

39

III,2,2038

You are naught, you are naught! I'll mark the play.
Pro. For us, and for our tragedy,
Here stooping to your clemency,
We beg your hearing patiently. [Exit.]

40

III,2,2043

'Tis brief, my lord.

41

III,2,2138

You are as good as a chorus, my lord.

42

III,2,2141

You are keen, my lord, you are keen.

43

III,2,2143

Still better, and worse.

44

III,2,2152

The King rises.

45

IV,5,2880

Where is the beauteous Majesty of Denmark?

46

IV,5,2882

[sings]
How should I your true-love know
From another one?
By his cockle bat and' staff
And his sandal shoon.

47

IV,5,2888

Say you? Nay, pray You mark.
(Sings) He is dead and gone, lady,
He is dead and gone;
At his head a grass-green turf,
At his heels a stone.
O, ho!

48

IV,5,2895

Pray you mark.
(Sings) White his shroud as the mountain snow-

49

IV,5,2899

[Sings]
Larded all with sweet flowers;
Which bewept to the grave did not go
With true-love showers.

50

IV,5,2904

Well, God dild you! They say the owl was a baker's daughter.
Lord, we know what we are, but know not what we may be. God be at
your table!

51

IV,5,2908

Pray let's have no words of this; but when they ask, you what
it means, say you this:
(Sings) To-morrow is Saint Valentine's day,
All in the morning bedtime,
And I a maid at your window,
To be your Valentine.
Then up he rose and donn'd his clo'es
And dupp'd the chamber door,
Let in the maid, that out a maid
Never departed more.

52

IV,5,2919

Indeed, la, without an oath, I'll make an end on't!
[Sings] By Gis and by Saint Charity,
Alack, and fie for shame!
Young men will do't if they come to't
By Cock, they are to blame.
Quoth she, 'Before you tumbled me,
You promis'd me to wed.'
He answers:
'So would I 'a' done, by yonder sun,
An thou hadst not come to my bed.'

53

IV,5,2930

I hope all will be well. We must be patient; but I cannot
choose but weep to think they would lay him i' th' cold ground.
My brother shall know of it; and so I thank you for your good
counsel. Come, my coach! Good night, ladies. Good night, sweet
ladies. Good night, good night. Exit

54

IV,5,3042

[sings]
They bore him barefac'd on the bier
(Hey non nony, nony, hey nony)
And in his grave rain'd many a tear.
Fare you well, my dove!

55

IV,5,3049

You must sing 'A-down a-down, and you call him a-down-a.' O,
how the wheel becomes it! It is the false steward, that stole his
master's daughter.

56

IV,5,3053

There's rosemary, that's for remembrance. Pray you, love,
remember. And there is pansies, that's for thoughts.

57

IV,5,3056

There's fennel for you, and columbines. There's rue for you,
and here's some for me. We may call it herb of grace o' Sundays.
O, you must wear your rue with a difference! There's a daisy. I
would give you some violets, but they wither'd all when my father
died. They say he made a good end.
[Sings] For bonny sweet Robin is all my joy.

58

IV,5,3064

[sings]
And will he not come again?
And will he not come again?
No, no, he is dead;
Go to thy deathbed;
He never will come again.
His beard was as white as snow,
All flaxen was his poll.
He is gone, he is gone,
And we cast away moan.
God 'a'mercy on his soul!
And of all Christian souls, I pray God. God b' wi' you.

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