Speeches (Lines) for Octavius
in "Julius Caesar"

Total: 19

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

IV,1,1861

Your brother too must die; consent you, Lepidus?

2

IV,1,1863

Prick him down, Antony.

3

IV,1,1871

Or here, or at the Capitol.

4

IV,1,1877

So you thought him;
And took his voice who should be prick'd to die,
In our black sentence and proscription.

5

IV,1,1890

You may do your will;
But he's a tried and valiant soldier.

6

IV,1,1911

Let us do so: for we are at the stake,
And bay'd about with many enemies;
And some that smile have in their hearts, I fear,
Millions of mischiefs.

7

V,1,2345

Now, Antony, our hopes are answered:
You said the enemy would not come down,
But keep the hills and upper regions;
It proves not so: their battles are at hand;
They mean to warn us at Philippi here,
Answering before we do demand of them.

8

V,1,2364

Upon the right hand I; keep thou the left.

9

V,1,2366

I do not cross you; but I will do so.
[March]
[Drum. Enter BRUTUS, CASSIUS, and their Army;
LUCILIUS, Tintinius, MESSALA, and others]

10

V,1,2372

Mark Antony, shall we give sign of battle?

11

V,1,2375

Stir not until the signal.

12

V,1,2377

Not that we love words better, as you do.

13

V,1,2399

Come, come, the cause: if arguing make us sweat,
The proof of it will turn to redder drops. Look;
I draw a sword against conspirators;
When think you that the sword goes up again?
Never, till Caesar's three and thirty wounds
Be well avenged; or till another Caesar
Have added slaughter to the sword of traitors.

14

V,1,2408

So I hope;
I was not born to die on Brutus' sword.

15

V,1,2415

Come, Antony, away!
Defiance, traitors, hurl we in your teeth:
If you dare fight to-day, come to the field;
If not, when you have stomachs.

16

V,5,2738

What man is that?

17

V,5,2746

All that served Brutus, I will entertain them.
Fellow, wilt thou bestow thy time with me?

18

V,5,2749

Do so, good Messala.

19

V,5,2762

According to his virtue let us use him,
With all respect and rites of burial.
Within my tent his bones to-night shall lie,
Most like a soldier, order'd honourably.
So call the field to rest; and let's away,
To part the glories of this happy day.

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