Speeches (Lines) for Nym
in "Henry V"

Total: 20

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,509

Bardolph. Well met, Corporal Nym.

Nym. Good morrow, Lieutenant Bardolph.


2

II,1,511

Bardolph. What, are Ancient Pistol and you friends yet?

Nym. For my part, I care not: I say little; but when
time shall serve, there shall be smiles; but that
shall be as it may. I dare not fight; but I will
wink and hold out mine iron: it is a simple one; but
what though? it will toast cheese, and it will
endure cold as another man's sword will: and
there's an end.


3

II,1,521

Bardolph. I will bestow a breakfast to make you friends; and
we'll be all three sworn brothers to France: let it
be so, good Corporal Nym.

Nym. Faith, I will live so long as I may, that's the
certain of it; and when I cannot live any longer, I
will do as I may: that is my rest, that is the
rendezvous of it.


4

II,1,528

Bardolph. It is certain, corporal, that he is married to Nell
Quickly: and certainly she did you wrong; for you
were troth-plight to her.

Nym. I cannot tell: things must be as they may: men may
sleep, and they may have their throats about them at
that time; and some say knives have edges. It must
be as it may: though patience be a tired mare, yet
she will plod. There must be conclusions. Well, I
cannot tell.


5

II,1,547

Bardolph. Good lieutenant! good corporal! offer nothing here.

Nym. Pish!


6

II,1,550

Hostess Quickly. Good Corporal Nym, show thy valour, and put up your sword.

Nym. Will you shog off? I would have you solus.


7

II,1,559

Pistol. 'Solus,' egregious dog? O viper vile!
The 'solus' in thy most mervailous face;
The 'solus' in thy teeth, and in thy throat,
And in thy hateful lungs, yea, in thy maw, perdy,
And, which is worse, within thy nasty mouth!
I do retort the 'solus' in thy bowels;
For I can take, and Pistol's cock is up,
And flashing fire will follow.

Nym. I am not Barbason; you cannot conjure me. I have an
humour to knock you indifferently well. If you grow
foul with me, Pistol, I will scour you with my
rapier, as I may, in fair terms: if you would walk
off, I would prick your guts a little, in good
terms, as I may: and that's the humour of it.


8

II,1,574

Pistol. An oath of mickle might; and fury shall abate.
Give me thy fist, thy fore-foot to me give:
Thy spirits are most tall.

Nym. I will cut thy throat, one time or other, in fair
terms: that is the humour of it.


9

II,1,599

Pistol. Let floods o'erswell, and fiends for food howl on!

Nym. You'll pay me the eight shillings I won of you at betting?


10

II,1,601

Pistol. Base is the slave that pays.

Nym. That now I will have: that's the humour of it.


11

II,1,610

Bardolph. Corporal Nym, an thou wilt be friends, be friends:
an thou wilt not, why, then, be enemies with me too.
Prithee, put up.

Nym. I shall have my eight shillings I won of you at betting?


12

II,1,618

Pistol. A noble shalt thou have, and present pay;
And liquor likewise will I give to thee,
And friendship shall combine, and brotherhood:
I'll live by Nym, and Nym shall live by me;
Is not this just? for I shall sutler be
Unto the camp, and profits will accrue.
Give me thy hand.

Nym. I shall have my noble?


13

II,1,620

Pistol. In cash most justly paid.

Nym. Well, then, that's the humour of't.


14

II,1,626

Hostess Quickly. As ever you came of women, come in quickly to Sir
John. Ah, poor heart! he is so shaked of a burning
quotidian tertian, that it is most lamentable to
behold. Sweet men, come to him.

Nym. The king hath run bad humours on the knight; that's
the even of it.


15

II,1,630

Pistol. Nym, thou hast spoke the right;
His heart is fracted and corroborate.

Nym. The king is a good king: but it must be as it may;
he passes some humours and careers.


16

II,3,859

Hostess Quickly. Nay, sure, he's not in hell: he's in Arthur's
bosom, if ever man went to Arthur's bosom. A' made
a finer end and went away an it had been any
christom child; a' parted even just between twelve
and one, even at the turning o' the tide: for after
I saw him fumble with the sheets and play with
flowers and smile upon his fingers' ends, I knew
there was but one way; for his nose was as sharp as
a pen, and a' babbled of green fields. 'How now,
sir John!' quoth I. 'what, man! be o' good
cheer.' So a' cried out 'God, God, God!' three or
four times. Now I, to comfort him, bid him a'
should not think of God; I hoped there was no need
to trouble himself with any such thoughts yet. So
a' bade me lay more clothes on his feet: I put my
hand into the bed and felt them, and they were as
cold as any stone; then I felt to his knees, and
they were as cold as any stone, and so upward and
upward, and all was as cold as any stone.

Nym. They say he cried out of sack.


17

II,3,875

Bardolph. Well, the fuel is gone that maintained that fire:
that's all the riches I got in his service.

Nym. Shall we shog? the king will be gone from
Southampton.


18

II,3,891

(stage directions). [Kissing her]

Nym. I cannot kiss, that is the humour of it; but, adieu.


19

III,2,1129

Bardolph. On, on, on, on, on! to the breach, to the breach!

Nym. Pray thee, corporal, stay: the knocks are too hot;
and, for mine own part, I have not a case of lives:
the humour of it is too hot, that is the very
plain-song of it.


20

III,2,1153

Pistol. Be merciful, great duke, to men of mould.
Abate thy rage, abate thy manly rage,
Abate thy rage, great duke!
Good bawcock, bate thy rage; use lenity, sweet chuck!

Nym. These be good humours! your honour wins bad humours.


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