Speeches (Lines) for Nurse
in "Romeo and Juliet"

Total: 90

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,382

Now, by my maidenhead, at twelve year old,
I bade her come. What, lamb! what, ladybird!...

2

I,3,387

Your mother.

3

I,3,394

Faith, I can tell her age unto an hour.

4

I,3,396

I'll lay fourteen of my teeth,—
And yet, to my teeth be it spoken, I have but four—...

5

I,3,401

Even or odd, of all days in the year,
Come Lammas-eve at night shall she be fourteen....

6

I,3,435

Yes, madam: yet I cannot choose but laugh,
To think it should leave crying and say 'Ay.'...

7

I,3,444

Peace, I have done. God mark thee to his grace!
Thou wast the prettiest babe that e'er I nursed:...

8

I,3,452

An honour! were not I thine only nurse,
I would say thou hadst suck'd wisdom from thy teat.

9

I,3,460

A man, young lady! lady, such a man
As all the world—why, he's a man of wax.

10

I,3,463

Nay, he's a flower; in faith, a very flower.

11

I,3,480

No less! nay, bigger; women grow by men.

12

I,3,493

Go, girl, seek happy nights to happy days.

13

I,5,738

Madam, your mother craves a word with you.

14

I,5,740

Marry, bachelor,
Her mother is the lady of the house,...

15

I,5,759

The son and heir of old Tiberio.

16

I,5,761

Marry, that, I think, be young Petrucio.

17

I,5,763

I know not.

18

I,5,766

His name is Romeo, and a Montague;
The only son of your great enemy.

19

I,5,772

What's this? what's this?

20

I,5,776

Anon, anon!
Come, let's away; the strangers all are gone.

21

II,2,1003

[Within] Madam!

22

II,2,1006

[Within] Madam!

23

II,4,1258

Peter!

24

II,4,1260

My fan, Peter.

25

II,4,1263

God ye good morrow, gentlemen.

26

II,4,1265

Is it good den?

27

II,4,1268

Out upon you! what a man are you!

28

II,4,1271

By my troth, it is well said; 'for himself to mar,'
quoth a'? Gentlemen, can any of you tell me where I...

29

II,4,1277

You say well.

30

II,4,1280

if you be he, sir, I desire some confidence with
you.

31

II,4,1301

Marry, farewell! I pray you, sir, what saucy
merchant was this, that was so full of his ropery?

32

II,4,1306

An a' speak any thing against me, I'll take him
down, an a' were lustier than he is, and twenty such...

33

II,4,1316

Now, afore God, I am so vexed, that every part about
me quivers. Scurvy knave! Pray you, sir, a word:...

34

II,4,1328

Good heart, and, i' faith, I will tell her as much:
Lord, Lord, she will be a joyful woman.

35

II,4,1331

I will tell her, sir, that you do protest; which, as
I take it, is a gentlemanlike offer.

36

II,4,1337

No truly sir; not a penny.

37

II,4,1339

This afternoon, sir? well, she shall be there.

38

II,4,1347

Now God in heaven bless thee! Hark you, sir.

39

II,4,1349

Is your man secret? Did you ne'er hear say,
Two may keep counsel, putting one away?

40

II,4,1352

Well, sir; my mistress is the sweetest lady—Lord,
Lord! when 'twas a little prating thing:—O, there...

41

II,4,1362

Ah. mocker! that's the dog's name; R is for
the—No; I know it begins with some other...

42

II,4,1368

Ay, a thousand times.
[Exit Romeo]...

43

II,4,1372

Peter, take my fan, and go before and apace.

44

II,5,1396

Peter, stay at the gate.

45

II,5,1402

I am a-weary, give me leave awhile:
Fie, how my bones ache! what a jaunt have I had!

46

II,5,1406

Jesu, what haste? can you not stay awhile?
Do you not see that I am out of breath?

47

II,5,1415

Well, you have made a simple choice; you know not
how to choose a man: Romeo! no, not he; though his...

48

II,5,1425

Lord, how my head aches! what a head have I!
It beats as it would fall in twenty pieces....

49

II,5,1432

Your love says, like an honest gentleman, and a
courteous, and a kind, and a handsome, and, I...

50

II,5,1439

O God's lady dear!
Are you so hot? marry, come up, I trow;...

51

II,5,1444

Have you got leave to go to shrift to-day?

52

II,5,1446

Then hie you hence to Friar Laurence' cell;
There stays a husband to make you a wife:...

53

III,2,1755

Ay, ay, the cords.

54

III,2,1758

Ah, well-a-day! he's dead, he's dead, he's dead!
We are undone, lady, we are undone!...

55

III,2,1762

Romeo can,
Though heaven cannot: O Romeo, Romeo!...

56

III,2,1774

I saw the wound, I saw it with mine eyes,—
God save the mark!—here on his manly breast:...

57

III,2,1783

O Tybalt, Tybalt, the best friend I had!
O courteous Tybalt! honest gentleman!...

58

III,2,1791

Tybalt is gone, and Romeo banished;
Romeo that kill'd him, he is banished.

59

III,2,1794

It did, it did; alas the day, it did!

60

III,2,1808

There's no trust,
No faith, no honesty in men; all perjured,...

61

III,2,1820

Will you speak well of him that kill'd your cousin?

62

III,2,1852

Weeping and wailing over Tybalt's corse:
Will you go to them? I will bring you thither.

63

III,2,1862

Hie to your chamber: I'll find Romeo
To comfort you: I wot well where he is....

64

III,3,1954

[Within] Let me come in, and you shall know
my errand;...

65

III,3,1959

O holy friar, O, tell me, holy friar,
Where is my lady's lord, where's Romeo?

66

III,3,1962

O, he is even in my mistress' case,
Just in her case! O woful sympathy!...

67

III,3,1970

Ah sir! ah sir! Well, death's the end of all.

68

III,3,1977

O, she says nothing, sir, but weeps and weeps;
And now falls on her bed; and then starts up,...

69

III,3,2040

O Lord, I could have stay'd here all the night
To hear good counsel: O, what learning is!...

70

III,3,2044

Here, sir, a ring she bid me give you, sir:
Hie you, make haste, for it grows very late.

71

III,5,2135

Madam!

72

III,5,2137

Your lady mother is coming to your chamber:
The day is broke; be wary, look about.

73

III,5,2277

God in heaven bless her!
You are to blame, my lord, to rate her so.

74

III,5,2281

I speak no treason.

75

III,5,2283

May not one speak?

76

III,5,2329

Faith, here it is.
Romeo is banish'd; and all the world to nothing,...

77

III,5,2344

And from my soul too;
Or else beshrew them both.

78

III,5,2347

What?

79

III,5,2352

Marry, I will; and this is wisely done.

80

IV,2,2508

Ay, forsooth.

81

IV,2,2511

See where she comes from shrift with merry look.

82

IV,4,2614

They call for dates and quinces in the pastry.

83

IV,4,2620

Go, you cot-quean, go,
Get you to bed; faith, You'll be sick to-morrow...

84

IV,5,2653

Mistress! what, mistress! Juliet! fast, I warrant her, she:
Why, lamb! why, lady! fie, you slug-a-bed!...

85

IV,5,2672

O lamentable day!

86

IV,5,2674

Look, look! O heavy day!

87

IV,5,2680

She's dead, deceased, she's dead; alack the day!

88

IV,5,2687

O lamentable day!

89

IV,5,2708

O woe! O woful, woful, woful day!
Most lamentable day, most woful day,...

90

IV,5,2757

Honest goodfellows, ah, put up, put up;
For, well you know, this is a pitiful case.

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