Speeches (Lines) for Mortimer
in "Henry IV, Part I"

Total: 13

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

III,1,1543

(stage directions). [Enter HOTSPUR, WORCESTER, MORTIMER, and GLENDOWER]

Mortimer. These promises are fair, the parties sure,
And our induction full of prosperous hope.


2

III,1,1595

Hotspur (Henry Percy). I think there's no man speaks better Welsh.
I'll to dinner.

Mortimer. Peace, cousin Percy; you will make him mad.


3

III,1,1606

Hotspur (Henry Percy). And I can teach thee, coz, to shame the devil
By telling truth: tell truth and shame the devil.
If thou have power to raise him, bring him hither,
And I'll be sworn I have power to shame him hence.
O, while you live, tell truth and shame the devil!

Mortimer. Come, come, no more of this unprofitable chat.


4

III,1,1615

Glendower. Come, here's the map: shall we divide our right
According to our threefold order ta'en?

Mortimer. The archdeacon hath divided it
Into three limits very equally:
England, from Trent and Severn hitherto,
By south and east is to my part assign'd:
All westward, Wales beyond the Severn shore,
And all the fertile land within that bound,
To Owen Glendower: and, dear coz, to you
The remnant northward, lying off from Trent.
And our indentures tripartite are drawn;
Which being sealed interchangeably,
A business that this night may execute,
To-morrow, cousin Percy, you and I
And my good Lord of Worcester will set forth
To meet your father and the Scottish power,
As is appointed us, at Shrewsbury.
My father Glendower is not ready yet,
Not shall we need his help these fourteen days.
Within that space you may have drawn together
Your tenants, friends and neighbouring gentlemen.


5

III,1,1650

Glendower. Not wind? it shall, it must; you see it doth.

Mortimer. Yea, but
Mark how he bears his course, and runs me up
With like advantage on the other side;
Gelding the opposed continent as much
As on the other side it takes from you.


6

III,1,1692

(stage directions). [Exit GLENDOWER]

Mortimer. Fie, cousin Percy! how you cross my father!


7

III,1,1710

Hotspur (Henry Percy). I cannot choose: sometime he angers me
With telling me of the mouldwarp and the ant,
Of the dreamer Merlin and his prophecies,
And of a dragon and a finless fish,
A clip-wing'd griffin and a moulten raven,
A couching lion and a ramping cat,
And such a deal of skimble-skamble stuff
As puts me from my faith. I tell you what;
He held me last night at least nine hours
In reckoning up the several devils' names
That were his lackeys: I cried 'hum,' and 'well, go to,'
But mark'd him not a word. O, he is as tedious
As a tired horse, a railing wife;
Worse than a smoky house: I had rather live
With cheese and garlic in a windmill, far,
Than feed on cates and have him talk to me
In any summer-house in Christendom.

Mortimer. In faith, he is a worthy gentleman,
Exceedingly well read, and profited
In strange concealments, valiant as a lion
And as wondrous affable and as bountiful
As mines of India. Shall I tell you, cousin?
He holds your temper in a high respect
And curbs himself even of his natural scope
When you come 'cross his humour; faith, he does:
I warrant you, that man is not alive
Might so have tempted him as you have done,
Without the taste of danger and reproof:
But do not use it oft, let me entreat you.


8

III,1,1738

(stage directions). [Re-enter GLENDOWER with the ladies]

Mortimer. This is the deadly spite that angers me;
My wife can speak no English, I no Welsh.


9

III,1,1742

Glendower. My daughter weeps: she will not part with you;
She'll be a soldier too, she'll to the wars.

Mortimer. Good father, tell her that she and my aunt Percy
Shall follow in your conduct speedily.


10

III,1,1748

(stage directions). [The lady speaks in Welsh]

Mortimer. I understand thy looks: that pretty Welsh
Which thou pour'st down from these swelling heavens
I am too perfect in; and, but for shame,
In such a parley should I answer thee.
[The lady speaks again in Welsh]
I understand thy kisses and thou mine,
And that's a feeling disputation:
But I will never be a truant, love,
Till I have learned thy language; for thy tongue
Makes Welsh as sweet as ditties highly penn'd,
Sung by a fair queen in a summer's bower,
With ravishing division, to her lute.


11

III,1,1762

(stage directions). [The lady speaks again in Welsh]

Mortimer. O, I am ignorance itself in this!


12

III,1,1772

Glendower. She bids you on the wanton rushes lay you down
And rest your gentle head upon her lap,
And she will sing the song that pleaseth you
And on your eyelids crown the god of sleep.
Charming your blood with pleasing heaviness,
Making such difference 'twixt wake and sleep
As is the difference betwixt day and night
The hour before the heavenly-harness'd team
Begins his golden progress in the east.

Mortimer. With all my heart I'll sit and hear her sing:
By that time will our book, I think, be drawn


13

III,1,1820

Glendower. Come, come, Lord Mortimer; you are as slow
As hot Lord Percy is on fire to go.
By this our book is drawn; we'll but seal,
And then to horse immediately.

Mortimer. With all my heart.


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