Speeches (Lines) for Mistress Page
in "Merry Wives of Windsor"

Total: 101

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,568

What, have I scaped love-letters in the holiday-
time of my beauty, and am I now a subject for them?
Let me see.
[Reads]
'Ask me no reason why I love you; for though
Love use Reason for his physician, he admits him
not for his counsellor. You are not young, no more
am I; go to then, there's sympathy: you are merry,
so am I; ha, ha! then there's more sympathy: you
love sack, and so do I; would you desire better
sympathy? Let it suffice thee, Mistress Page,—at
the least, if the love of soldier can suffice,—
that I love thee. I will not say, pity me; 'tis
not a soldier-like phrase: but I say, love me. By me,
Thine own true knight,
By day or night,
Or any kind of light,
With all his might
For thee to fight, JOHN FALSTAFF'
What a Herod of Jewry is this! O wicked
world! One that is well-nigh worn to pieces with
age to show himself a young gallant! What an
unweighed behavior hath this Flemish drunkard
picked—with the devil's name!—out of my
conversation, that he dares in this manner assay me?
Why, he hath not been thrice in my company! What
should I say to him? I was then frugal of my
mirth: Heaven forgive me! Why, I'll exhibit a bill
in the parliament for the putting down of men. How
shall I be revenged on him? for revenged I will be,
as sure as his guts are made of puddings.

2

II,1,601

And, trust me, I was coming to you. You look very
ill.

3

II,1,604

Faith, but you do, in my mind.

4

II,1,607

What's the matter, woman?

5

II,1,610

Hang the trifle, woman! take the honour. What is
it? dispense with trifles; what is it?

6

II,1,614

What? thou liest! Sir Alice Ford! These knights
will hack; and so thou shouldst not alter the
article of thy gentry.

7

II,1,632

Letter for letter, but that the name of Page and
Ford differs! To thy great comfort in this mystery
of ill opinions, here's the twin-brother of thy
letter: but let thine inherit first; for, I
protest, mine never shall. I warrant he hath a
thousand of these letters, writ with blank space for
different names—sure, more,—and these are of the
second edition: he will print them, out of doubt;
for he cares not what he puts into the press, when
he would put us two. I had rather be a giantess,
and lie under Mount Pelion. Well, I will find you
twenty lascivious turtles ere one chaste man.

8

II,1,646

Nay, I know not: it makes me almost ready to
wrangle with mine own honesty. I'll entertain
myself like one that I am not acquainted withal;
for, sure, unless he know some strain in me, that I
know not myself, he would never have boarded me in this fury.

9

II,1,653

So will I. if he come under my hatches, I'll never
to sea again. Let's be revenged on him: let's
appoint him a meeting; give him a show of comfort in
his suit and lead him on with a fine-baited delay,
till he hath pawned his horses to mine host of the Garter.

10

II,1,662

Why, look where he comes; and my good man too: he's
as far from jealousy as I am from giving him cause;
and that I hope is an unmeasurable distance.

11

II,1,666

Let's consult together against this greasy knight.
Come hither.

12

II,1,709

Whither go you, George? Hark you.

13

II,1,714

Have with you. You'll come to dinner, George.
[Aside to MISTRESS FORD]
Look who comes yonder: she shall be our messenger
to this paltry knight.

14

II,1,721

You are come to see my daughter Anne?

15

II,1,723

Go in with us and see: we have an hour's talk with
you.

16

III,2,1313

Nay, keep your way, little gallant; you were wont to
be a follower, but now you are a leader. Whether
had you rather lead mine eyes, or eye your master's heels?

17

III,2,1318

O, you are a flattering boy: now I see you'll be a courtier.

18

III,2,1321

Truly, sir, to see your wife. Is she at home?

19

III,2,1325

Be sure of that,—two other husbands.

20

III,2,1327

I cannot tell what the dickens his name is my
husband had him of. What do you call your knight's
name, sirrah?

21

III,2,1332

He, he; I can never hit on's name. There is such a
league between my good man and he! Is your wife at
home indeed?

22

III,2,1336

By your leave, sir: I am sick till I see her.

23

III,3,1405

Quickly, quickly! is the buck-basket—

24

III,3,1408

Come, come, come.

25

III,3,1410

Give your men the charge; we must be brief.

26

III,3,1418

You will do it?

27

III,3,1422

Here comes little Robin.

28

III,3,1427

You little Jack-a-Lent, have you been true to us?

29

III,3,1432

Thou'rt a good boy: this secrecy of thine shall be
a tailor to thee and shall make thee a new doublet
and hose. I'll go hide me.

30

III,3,1438

I warrant thee; if I do not act it, hiss me.

31

III,3,1491

O Mistress Ford, what have you done? You're shamed,
you're overthrown, you're undone for ever!

32

III,3,1494

O well-a-day, Mistress Ford! having an honest man
to your husband, to give him such cause of suspicion!

33

III,3,1497

What cause of suspicion! Out pon you! how am I
mistook in you!

34

III,3,1500

Your husband's coming hither, woman, with all the
officers in Windsor, to search for a gentleman that
he says is here now in the house by your consent, to
take an ill advantage of his assence: you are undone.

35

III,3,1505

Pray heaven it be not so, that you have such a man
here! but 'tis most certain your husband's coming,
with half Windsor at his heels, to search for such a
one. I come before to tell you. If you know
yourself clear, why, I am glad of it; but if you
have a friend here convey, convey him out. Be not
amazed; call all your senses to you; defend your
reputation, or bid farewell to your good life for ever.

36

III,3,1517

For shame! never stand 'you had rather' and 'you
had rather:' your husband's here at hand, bethink
you of some conveyance: in the house you cannot
hide him. O, how have you deceived me! Look, here
is a basket: if he be of any reasonable stature, he
may creep in here; and throw foul linen upon him, as
if it were going to bucking: or—it is whiting-time
—send him by your two men to Datchet-mead.

37

III,3,1529

What, Sir John Falstaff! Are these your letters, knight?

38

III,3,1533

Help to cover your master, boy. Call your men,
Mistress Ford. You dissembling knight!

39

III,3,1567

Is there not a double excellency in this?

40

III,3,1570

What a taking was he in when your husband asked who
was in the basket!

41

III,3,1574

Hang him, dishonest rascal! I would all of the same
strain were in the same distress.

42

III,3,1579

I will lay a plot to try that; and we will yet have
more tricks with Falstaff: his dissolute disease will
scarce obey this medicine.

43

III,3,1586

We will do it: let him be sent for to-morrow,
eight o'clock, to have amends.

44

III,3,1591

[Aside to MISTRESS FORD] Heard you that?

45

III,3,1596

You do yourself mighty wrong, Master Ford.

46

III,4,1702

Good Master Fenton, come not to my child.

47

III,4,1716

I mean it not; I seek you a better husband.

48

III,4,1720

Come, trouble not yourself. Good Master Fenton,
I will not be your friend nor enemy:
My daughter will I question how she loves you,
And as I find her, so am I affected.
Till then farewell, sir: she must needs go in;
Her father will be angry.

49

IV,1,1892

Is he at Master Ford's already, think'st thou?

50

IV,1,1896

I'll be with her by and by; I'll but bring my young
man here to school. Look, where his master comes;
'tis a playing-day, I see.
[Enter SIR HUGH EVANS]
How now, Sir Hugh! no school to-day?

51

IV,1,1903

Sir Hugh, my husband says my son profits nothing in
the world at his book. I pray you, ask him some
questions in his accidence.

52

IV,1,1907

Come on, sirrah; hold up your head; answer your
master, be not afraid.

53

IV,1,1939

Peace!

54

IV,1,1954

Prithee, hold thy peace.

55

IV,1,1960

He is a better scholar than I thought he was.

56

IV,1,1962

Adieu, good Sir Hugh.
[Exit SIR HUGH EVANS]
Get you home, boy. Come, we stay too long.

57

IV,2,1975

[Within] What, ho, gossip Ford! what, ho!

58

IV,2,1979

How now, sweetheart! who's at home besides yourself?

59

IV,2,1981

Indeed!

60

IV,2,1985

Truly, I am so glad you have nobody here.

61

IV,2,1987

Why, woman, your husband is in his old lunes again:
he so takes on yonder with my husband; so rails
against all married mankind; so curses all Eve's
daughters, of what complexion soever; and so buffets
himself on the forehead, crying, 'Peer out, peer
out!' that any madness I ever yet beheld seemed but
tameness, civility and patience, to this his
distemper he is in now: I am glad the fat knight is not here.

62

IV,2,1996

Of none but him; and swears he was carried out, the
last time he searched for him, in a basket; protests
to my husband he is now here, and hath drawn him and
the rest of their company from their sport, to make
another experiment of his suspicion: but I am glad
the knight is not here; now he shall see his own foolery.

63

IV,2,2003

Hard by; at street end; he will be here anon.

64

IV,2,2005

Why then you are utterly shamed, and he's but a dead
man. What a woman are you!—Away with him, away
with him! better shame than murder.

65

IV,2,2013

Alas, three of Master Ford's brothers watch the door
with pistols, that none shall issue out; otherwise
you might slip away ere he came. But what make you here?

66

IV,2,2025

If you go out in your own semblance, you die, Sir
John. Unless you go out disguised—

67

IV,2,2028

Alas the day, I know not! There is no woman's gown
big enough for him otherwise he might put on a hat,
a muffler and a kerchief, and so escape.

68

IV,2,2035

On my word, it will serve him; she's as big as he
is: and there's her thrummed hat and her muffler
too. Run up, Sir John.

69

IV,2,2040

Quick, quick! we'll come dress you straight: put
on the gown the while.

70

IV,2,2047

Heaven guide him to thy husband's cudgel, and the
devil guide his cudgel afterwards!

71

IV,2,2050

Ah, in good sadness, is he; and talks of the basket
too, howsoever he hath had intelligence.

72

IV,2,2055

Nay, but he'll be here presently: let's go dress him
like the witch of Brentford.

73

IV,2,2060

Hang him, dishonest varlet! we cannot misuse him enough.
We'll leave a proof, by that which we will do,
Wives may be merry, and yet honest too:
We do not act that often jest and laugh;
'Tis old, but true, Still swine eat all the draff.

74

IV,2,2137

Come, Mother Prat; come, give me your hand.

75

IV,2,2144

Are you not ashamed? I think you have killed the
poor woman.

76

IV,2,2157

Trust me, he beat him most pitifully.

77

IV,2,2160

I'll have the cudgel hallowed and hung o'er the
altar; it hath done meritorious service.

78

IV,2,2165

The spirit of wantonness is, sure, scared out of
him: if the devil have him not in fee-simple, with
fine and recovery, he will never, I think, in the
way of waste, attempt us again.

79

IV,2,2170

Yes, by all means; if it be but to scrape the
figures out of your husband's brains. If they can
find in their hearts the poor unvirtuous fat knight
shall be any further afflicted, we two will still be
the ministers.

80

IV,2,2178

Come, to the forge with it then; shape it: I would
not have things cool.

81

IV,4,2199

Within a quarter of an hour.

82

IV,4,2223

There is an old tale goes that Herne the hunter,
Sometime a keeper here in Windsor forest,
Doth all the winter-time, at still midnight,
Walk round about an oak, with great ragg'd horns;
And there he blasts the tree and takes the cattle
And makes milch-kine yield blood and shakes a chain
In a most hideous and dreadful manner:
You have heard of such a spirit, and well you know
The superstitious idle-headed eld
Received and did deliver to our age
This tale of Herne the hunter for a truth.

83

IV,4,2242

That likewise have we thought upon, and thus:
Nan Page my daughter and my little son
And three or four more of their growth we'll dress
Like urchins, ouphes and fairies, green and white,
With rounds of waxen tapers on their heads,
And rattles in their hands: upon a sudden,
As Falstaff, she and I, are newly met,
Let them from forth a sawpit rush at once
With some diffused song: upon their sight,
We two in great amazedness will fly:
Then let them all encircle him about
And, fairy-like, to-pinch the unclean knight,
And ask him why, that hour of fairy revel,
In their so sacred paths he dares to tread
In shape profane.

84

IV,4,2260

The truth being known,
We'll all present ourselves, dis-horn the spirit,
And mock him home to Windsor.

85

IV,4,2269

My Nan shall be the queen of all the fairies,
Finely attired in a robe of white.

86

IV,4,2278

Fear not you that. Go get us properties
And tricking for our fairies.

87

IV,4,2283

Go, Mistress Ford,
Send quickly to Sir John, to know his mind.
[Exit MISTRESS FORD]
I'll to the doctor: he hath my good will,
And none but he, to marry with Nan Page.
That Slender, though well landed, is an idiot;
And he my husband best of all affects.
The doctor is well money'd, and his friends
Potent at court: he, none but he, shall have her,
Though twenty thousand worthier come to crave her.

88

V,3,2528

Master doctor, my daughter is in green: when you
see your time, take her by the band, away with her
to the deanery, and dispatch it quickly. Go before
into the Park: we two must go together.

89

V,3,2533

Fare you well, sir.
[Exit DOCTOR CAIUS]
My husband will not rejoice so much at the abuse of
Falstaff as he will chafe at the doctor's marrying
my daughter: but 'tis no matter; better a little
chiding than a great deal of heart-break.

90

V,3,2541

They are all couched in a pit hard by Herne's oak,
with obscured lights; which, at the very instant of
Falstaff's and our meeting, they will at once
display to the night.

91

V,3,2546

If he be not amazed, he will be mocked; if he be
amazed, he will every way be mocked.

92

V,3,2549

Against such lewdsters and their lechery
Those that betray them do no treachery.

93

V,5,2590

Alas, what noise?

94

V,5,2680

I pray you, come, hold up the jest no higher
Now, good Sir John, how like you Windsor wives?
See you these, husband? do not these fair yokes
Become the forest better than the town?

95

V,5,2720

Why Sir John, do you think, though we would have the
virtue out of our hearts by the head and shoulders
and have given ourselves without scruple to hell,
that ever the devil could have made you our delight?

96

V,5,2725

A puffed man?

97

V,5,2746

[Aside] Doctors doubt that: if Anne Page be my
daughter, she is, by this, Doctor Caius' wife.

98

V,5,2770

Good George, be not angry: I knew of your purpose;
turned my daughter into green; and, indeed, she is
now with the doctor at the deanery, and there married.

99

V,5,2777

Why, did you take her in green?

100

V,5,2786

Why went you not with master doctor, maid?

101

V,5,2806

Well, I will muse no further. Master Fenton,
Heaven give you many, many merry days!
Good husband, let us every one go home,
And laugh this sport o'er by a country fire;
Sir John and all.

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