Speeches (Lines) for Mistress Page
in "Merry Wives of Windsor"

Total: 101

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,568

What, have I scaped love-letters in the holiday-
time of my beauty, and am I now a subject for them?...

2

II,1,601

And, trust me, I was coming to you. You look very
ill.

3

II,1,604

Faith, but you do, in my mind.

4

II,1,607

What's the matter, woman?

5

II,1,610

Hang the trifle, woman! take the honour. What is
it? dispense with trifles; what is it?

6

II,1,614

What? thou liest! Sir Alice Ford! These knights
will hack; and so thou shouldst not alter the...

7

II,1,632

Letter for letter, but that the name of Page and
Ford differs! To thy great comfort in this mystery...

8

II,1,646

Nay, I know not: it makes me almost ready to
wrangle with mine own honesty. I'll entertain...

9

II,1,653

So will I. if he come under my hatches, I'll never
to sea again. Let's be revenged on him: let's...

10

II,1,662

Why, look where he comes; and my good man too: he's
as far from jealousy as I am from giving him cause;...

11

II,1,666

Let's consult together against this greasy knight.
Come hither.

12

II,1,709

Whither go you, George? Hark you.

13

II,1,714

Have with you. You'll come to dinner, George.
[Aside to MISTRESS FORD]...

14

II,1,721

You are come to see my daughter Anne?

15

II,1,723

Go in with us and see: we have an hour's talk with
you.

16

III,2,1313

Nay, keep your way, little gallant; you were wont to
be a follower, but now you are a leader. Whether...

17

III,2,1318

O, you are a flattering boy: now I see you'll be a courtier.

18

III,2,1321

Truly, sir, to see your wife. Is she at home?

19

III,2,1325

Be sure of that,—two other husbands.

20

III,2,1327

I cannot tell what the dickens his name is my
husband had him of. What do you call your knight's...

21

III,2,1332

He, he; I can never hit on's name. There is such a
league between my good man and he! Is your wife at...

22

III,2,1336

By your leave, sir: I am sick till I see her.

23

III,3,1405

Quickly, quickly! is the buck-basket—

24

III,3,1408

Come, come, come.

25

III,3,1410

Give your men the charge; we must be brief.

26

III,3,1418

You will do it?

27

III,3,1422

Here comes little Robin.

28

III,3,1427

You little Jack-a-Lent, have you been true to us?

29

III,3,1432

Thou'rt a good boy: this secrecy of thine shall be
a tailor to thee and shall make thee a new doublet...

30

III,3,1438

I warrant thee; if I do not act it, hiss me.

31

III,3,1491

O Mistress Ford, what have you done? You're shamed,
you're overthrown, you're undone for ever!

32

III,3,1494

O well-a-day, Mistress Ford! having an honest man
to your husband, to give him such cause of suspicion!

33

III,3,1497

What cause of suspicion! Out pon you! how am I
mistook in you!

34

III,3,1500

Your husband's coming hither, woman, with all the
officers in Windsor, to search for a gentleman that...

35

III,3,1505

Pray heaven it be not so, that you have such a man
here! but 'tis most certain your husband's coming,...

36

III,3,1517

For shame! never stand 'you had rather' and 'you
had rather:' your husband's here at hand, bethink...

37

III,3,1529

What, Sir John Falstaff! Are these your letters, knight?

38

III,3,1533

Help to cover your master, boy. Call your men,
Mistress Ford. You dissembling knight!

39

III,3,1567

Is there not a double excellency in this?

40

III,3,1570

What a taking was he in when your husband asked who
was in the basket!

41

III,3,1574

Hang him, dishonest rascal! I would all of the same
strain were in the same distress.

42

III,3,1579

I will lay a plot to try that; and we will yet have
more tricks with Falstaff: his dissolute disease will...

43

III,3,1586

We will do it: let him be sent for to-morrow,
eight o'clock, to have amends.

44

III,3,1591

[Aside to MISTRESS FORD] Heard you that?

45

III,3,1596

You do yourself mighty wrong, Master Ford.

46

III,4,1702

Good Master Fenton, come not to my child.

47

III,4,1716

I mean it not; I seek you a better husband.

48

III,4,1720

Come, trouble not yourself. Good Master Fenton,
I will not be your friend nor enemy:...

49

IV,1,1892

Is he at Master Ford's already, think'st thou?

50

IV,1,1896

I'll be with her by and by; I'll but bring my young
man here to school. Look, where his master comes;...

51

IV,1,1903

Sir Hugh, my husband says my son profits nothing in
the world at his book. I pray you, ask him some...

52

IV,1,1907

Come on, sirrah; hold up your head; answer your
master, be not afraid.

53

IV,1,1939

Peace!

54

IV,1,1954

Prithee, hold thy peace.

55

IV,1,1960

He is a better scholar than I thought he was.

56

IV,1,1962

Adieu, good Sir Hugh.
[Exit SIR HUGH EVANS]...

57

IV,2,1975

[Within] What, ho, gossip Ford! what, ho!

58

IV,2,1979

How now, sweetheart! who's at home besides yourself?

59

IV,2,1981

Indeed!

60

IV,2,1985

Truly, I am so glad you have nobody here.

61

IV,2,1987

Why, woman, your husband is in his old lunes again:
he so takes on yonder with my husband; so rails...

62

IV,2,1996

Of none but him; and swears he was carried out, the
last time he searched for him, in a basket; protests...

63

IV,2,2003

Hard by; at street end; he will be here anon.

64

IV,2,2005

Why then you are utterly shamed, and he's but a dead
man. What a woman are you!—Away with him, away...

65

IV,2,2013

Alas, three of Master Ford's brothers watch the door
with pistols, that none shall issue out; otherwise...

66

IV,2,2025

If you go out in your own semblance, you die, Sir
John. Unless you go out disguised—

67

IV,2,2028

Alas the day, I know not! There is no woman's gown
big enough for him otherwise he might put on a hat,...

68

IV,2,2035

On my word, it will serve him; she's as big as he
is: and there's her thrummed hat and her muffler...

69

IV,2,2040

Quick, quick! we'll come dress you straight: put
on the gown the while.

70

IV,2,2047

Heaven guide him to thy husband's cudgel, and the
devil guide his cudgel afterwards!

71

IV,2,2050

Ah, in good sadness, is he; and talks of the basket
too, howsoever he hath had intelligence.

72

IV,2,2055

Nay, but he'll be here presently: let's go dress him
like the witch of Brentford.

73

IV,2,2060

Hang him, dishonest varlet! we cannot misuse him enough.
We'll leave a proof, by that which we will do,...

74

IV,2,2137

Come, Mother Prat; come, give me your hand.

75

IV,2,2144

Are you not ashamed? I think you have killed the
poor woman.

76

IV,2,2157

Trust me, he beat him most pitifully.

77

IV,2,2160

I'll have the cudgel hallowed and hung o'er the
altar; it hath done meritorious service.

78

IV,2,2165

The spirit of wantonness is, sure, scared out of
him: if the devil have him not in fee-simple, with...

79

IV,2,2170

Yes, by all means; if it be but to scrape the
figures out of your husband's brains. If they can...

80

IV,2,2178

Come, to the forge with it then; shape it: I would
not have things cool.

81

IV,4,2199

Within a quarter of an hour.

82

IV,4,2223

There is an old tale goes that Herne the hunter,
Sometime a keeper here in Windsor forest,...

83

IV,4,2242

That likewise have we thought upon, and thus:
Nan Page my daughter and my little son...

84

IV,4,2260

The truth being known,
We'll all present ourselves, dis-horn the spirit,...

85

IV,4,2269

My Nan shall be the queen of all the fairies,
Finely attired in a robe of white.

86

IV,4,2278

Fear not you that. Go get us properties
And tricking for our fairies.

87

IV,4,2283

Go, Mistress Ford,
Send quickly to Sir John, to know his mind....

88

V,3,2528

Master doctor, my daughter is in green: when you
see your time, take her by the band, away with her...

89

V,3,2533

Fare you well, sir.
[Exit DOCTOR CAIUS]...

90

V,3,2541

They are all couched in a pit hard by Herne's oak,
with obscured lights; which, at the very instant of...

91

V,3,2546

If he be not amazed, he will be mocked; if he be
amazed, he will every way be mocked.

92

V,3,2549

Against such lewdsters and their lechery
Those that betray them do no treachery.

93

V,5,2590

Alas, what noise?

94

V,5,2680

I pray you, come, hold up the jest no higher
Now, good Sir John, how like you Windsor wives?...

95

V,5,2720

Why Sir John, do you think, though we would have the
virtue out of our hearts by the head and shoulders...

96

V,5,2725

A puffed man?

97

V,5,2746

[Aside] Doctors doubt that: if Anne Page be my
daughter, she is, by this, Doctor Caius' wife.

98

V,5,2770

Good George, be not angry: I knew of your purpose;
turned my daughter into green; and, indeed, she is...

99

V,5,2777

Why, did you take her in green?

100

V,5,2786

Why went you not with master doctor, maid?

101

V,5,2806

Well, I will muse no further. Master Fenton,
Heaven give you many, many merry days!...

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