Speeches (Lines) for Mistress Ford
in "Merry Wives of Windsor"

Total: 85

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,600

Mistress Page! trust me, I was going to your house.

2

II,1,603

Nay, I'll ne'er believe that; I have to show to the contrary.

3

II,1,605

Well, I do then; yet I say I could show you to the
contrary. O Mistress Page, give me some counsel!

4

II,1,608

O woman, if it were not for one trifling respect, I
could come to such honour!

5

II,1,612

If I would but go to hell for an eternal moment or so,
I could be knighted.

6

II,1,617

We burn daylight: here, read, read; perceive how I
might be knighted. I shall think the worse of fat
men, as long as I have an eye to make difference of
men's liking: and yet he would not swear; praised
women's modesty; and gave such orderly and
well-behaved reproof to all uncomeliness, that I
would have sworn his disposition would have gone to
the truth of his words; but they do no more adhere
and keep place together than the Hundredth Psalm to
the tune of 'Green Sleeves.' What tempest, I trow,
threw this whale, with so many tuns of oil in his
belly, ashore at Windsor? How shall I be revenged
on him? I think the best way were to entertain him
with hope, till the wicked fire of lust have melted
him in his own grease. Did you ever hear the like?

7

II,1,644

Why, this is the very same; the very hand, the very
words. What doth he think of us?

8

II,1,651

'Boarding,' call you it? I'll be sure to keep him
above deck.

9

II,1,658

Nay, I will consent to act any villany against him,
that may not sully the chariness of our honesty. O,
that my husband saw this letter! it would give
eternal food to his jealousy.

10

II,1,665

You are the happier woman.

11

II,1,710

How now, sweet Frank! why art thou melancholy?

12

II,1,712

Faith, thou hast some crotchets in thy head. Now,
will you go, Mistress Page?

13

II,1,718

[Aside to MISTRESS PAGE] Trust me, I thought on her:
she'll fit it.

14

III,3,1404

What, John! What, Robert!

15

III,3,1406

I warrant. What, Robin, I say!

16

III,3,1409

Here, set it down.

17

III,3,1411

Marry, as I told you before, John and Robert, be
ready here hard by in the brew-house: and when I
suddenly call you, come forth, and without any pause
or staggering take this basket on your shoulders:
that done, trudge with it in all haste, and carry
it among the whitsters in Datchet-mead, and there
empty it in the muddy ditch close by the Thames side.

18

III,3,1419

I ha' told them over and over; they lack no
direction. Be gone, and come when you are called.

19

III,3,1424

How now, my eyas-musket! what news with you?

20

III,3,1435

Do so. Go tell thy master I am alone.
[Exit ROBIN]
Mistress Page, remember you your cue.

21

III,3,1440

Go to, then: we'll use this unwholesome humidity,
this gross watery pumpion; we'll teach him to know
turtles from jays.

22

III,3,1447

O sweet Sir John!

23

III,3,1452

I your lady, Sir John! alas, I should be a pitiful lady!

24

III,3,1458

A plain kerchief, Sir John: my brows become nothing
else; nor that well neither.

25

III,3,1466

Believe me, there is no such thing in me.

26

III,3,1474

Do not betray me, sir. I fear you love Mistress Page.

27

III,3,1478

Well, heaven knows how I love you; and you shall one
day find it.

28

III,3,1481

Nay, I must tell you, so you do; or else I could not
be in that mind.

29

III,3,1487

Pray you, do so: she's a very tattling woman.
[FALSTAFF hides himself]
[Re-enter MISTRESS PAGE and ROBIN]
What's the matter? how now!

30

III,3,1493

What's the matter, good Mistress Page?

31

III,3,1496

What cause of suspicion?

32

III,3,1499

Why, alas, what's the matter?

33

III,3,1504

'Tis not so, I hope.

34

III,3,1513

What shall I do? There is a gentleman my dear
friend; and I fear not mine own shame so much as his
peril: I had rather than a thousand pound he were
out of the house.

35

III,3,1525

He's too big to go in there. What shall I do?

36

III,3,1535

What, John! Robert! John!
[Exit ROBIN]
[Re-enter Servants]
Go take up these clothes here quickly. Where's the
cowl-staff? look, how you drumble! Carry them to
the laundress in Datchet-meat; quickly, come.

37

III,3,1546

Why, what have you to do whither they bear it? You
were best meddle with buck-washing.

38

III,3,1568

I know not which pleases me better, that my husband
is deceived, or Sir John.

39

III,3,1572

I am half afraid he will have need of washing; so
throwing him into the water will do him a benefit.

40

III,3,1576

I think my husband hath some special suspicion of
Falstaff's being here; for I never saw him so gross
in his jealousy till now.

41

III,3,1582

Shall we send that foolish carrion, Mistress
Quickly, to him, and excuse his throwing into the
water; and give him another hope, to betray him to
another punishment?

42

III,3,1592

You use me well, Master Ford, do you?

43

III,3,1594

Heaven make you better than your thoughts!

44

IV,2,1974

He's a-birding, sweet Sir John.

45

IV,2,1976

Step into the chamber, Sir John.

46

IV,2,1980

Why, none but mine own people.

47

IV,2,1982

No, certainly.
[Aside to her]
Speak louder.

48

IV,2,1986

Why?

49

IV,2,1995

Why, does he talk of him?

50

IV,2,2002

How near is he, Mistress Page?

51

IV,2,2004

I am undone! The knight is here.

52

IV,2,2017

There they always use to discharge their
birding-pieces. Creep into the kiln-hole.

53

IV,2,2020

He will seek there, on my word. Neither press,
coffer, chest, trunk, well, vault, but he hath an
abstract for the remembrance of such places, and
goes to them by his note: there is no hiding you in the house.

54

IV,2,2027

How might we disguise him?

55

IV,2,2033

My maid's aunt, the fat woman of Brentford, has a
gown above.

56

IV,2,2038

Go, go, sweet Sir John: Mistress Page and I will
look some linen for your head.

57

IV,2,2043

I would my husband would meet him in this shape: he
cannot abide the old woman of Brentford; he swears
she's a witch; forbade her my house and hath
threatened to beat her.

58

IV,2,2049

But is my husband coming?

59

IV,2,2052

We'll try that; for I'll appoint my men to carry the
basket again, to meet him at the door with it, as
they did last time.

60

IV,2,2057

I'll first direct my men what they shall do with the
basket. Go up; I'll bring linen for him straight.

61

IV,2,2067

Go, sirs, take the basket again on your shoulders:
your master is hard at door; if he bid you set it
down, obey him: quickly, dispatch.

62

IV,2,2092

Heaven be my witness you do, if you suspect me in
any dishonesty.

63

IV,2,2097

Are you not ashamed? let the clothes alone.

64

IV,2,2102

Why, man, why?

65

IV,2,2108

If you find a man there, he shall die a flea's death.

66

IV,2,2122

What, ho, Mistress Page! come you and the old woman
down; my husband will come into the chamber.

67

IV,2,2125

Nay, it is my maid's aunt of Brentford.

68

IV,2,2134

Nay, good, sweet husband! Good gentlemen, let him
not strike the old woman.

69

IV,2,2146

Nay, he will do it. 'Tis a goodly credit for you.

70

IV,2,2158

Nay, by the mass, that he did not; he beat him most
unpitifully, methought.

71

IV,2,2162

What think you? may we, with the warrant of
womanhood and the witness of a good conscience,
pursue him with any further revenge?

72

IV,2,2169

Shall we tell our husbands how we have served him?

73

IV,2,2175

I'll warrant they'll have him publicly shamed: and
methinks there would be no period to the jest,
should he not be publicly shamed.

74

IV,4,2221

Devise but how you'll use him when he comes,
And let us two devise to bring him thither.

75

IV,4,2237

Marry, this is our device;
That Falstaff at that oak shall meet with us.

76

IV,4,2257

And till he tell the truth,
Let the supposed fairies pinch him sound
And burn him with their tapers.

77

V,3,2539

Where is Nan now and her troop of fairies, and the
Welsh devil Hugh?

78

V,3,2545

That cannot choose but amaze him.

79

V,3,2548

We'll betray him finely.

80

V,3,2551

The hour draws on. To the oak, to the oak!

81

V,5,2577

Sir John! art thou there, my deer? my male deer?

82

V,5,2582

Mistress Page is come with me, sweetheart.

83

V,5,2591

Heaven forgive our sins

84

V,5,2593

[with Mistress Page] Away, away!

85

V,5,2691

Sir John, we have had ill luck; we could never meet.
I will never take you for my love again; but I will
always count you my deer.

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