Speeches (Lines) for Mercutio
in "Romeo and Juliet"

Total: 62

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,4,509

Nay, gentle Romeo, we must have you dance.

2

I,4,513

You are a lover; borrow Cupid's wings,
And soar with them above a common bound.

3

I,4,519

And, to sink in it, should you burden love;
Too great oppression for a tender thing.

4

I,4,523

If love be rough with you, be rough with love;
Prick love for pricking, and you beat love down....

5

I,4,536

Tut, dun's the mouse, the constable's own word:
If thou art dun, we'll draw thee from the mire...

6

I,4,541

I mean, sir, in delay
We waste our lights in vain, like lamps by day....

7

I,4,547

Why, may one ask?

8

I,4,549

And so did I.

9

I,4,551

That dreamers often lie.

10

I,4,553

O, then, I see Queen Mab hath been with you.
She is the fairies' midwife, and she comes...

11

I,4,598

True, I talk of dreams,
Which are the children of an idle brain,...

12

II,1,801

He is wise;
And, on my lie, hath stol'n him home to bed.

13

II,1,805

Nay, I'll conjure too.
Romeo! humours! madman! passion! lover!...

14

II,1,822

This cannot anger him: 'twould anger him
To raise a spirit in his mistress' circle...

15

II,1,832

If love be blind, love cannot hit the mark.
Now will he sit under a medlar tree,...

16

II,4,1159

Where the devil should this Romeo be?
Came he not home to-night?

17

II,4,1162

Ah, that same pale hard-hearted wench, that Rosaline.
Torments him so, that he will sure run mad.

18

II,4,1166

A challenge, on my life.

19

II,4,1168

Any man that can write may answer a letter.

20

II,4,1171

Alas poor Romeo! he is already dead; stabbed with a
white wench's black eye; shot through the ear with a...

21

II,4,1177

More than prince of cats, I can tell you. O, he is
the courageous captain of compliments. He fights as...

22

II,4,1187

The pox of such antic, lisping, affecting
fantasticoes; these new tuners of accents! 'By Jesu,...

23

II,4,1198

Without his roe, like a dried herring: flesh, flesh,
how art thou fishified! Now is he for the numbers...

24

II,4,1209

The ship, sir, the slip; can you not conceive?

25

II,4,1212

That's as much as to say, such a case as yours
constrains a man to bow in the hams.

26

II,4,1215

Thou hast most kindly hit it.

27

II,4,1217

Nay, I am the very pink of courtesy.

28

II,4,1219

Right.

29

II,4,1221

Well said: follow me this jest now till thou hast
worn out thy pump, that when the single sole of it...

30

II,4,1226

Come between us, good Benvolio; my wits faint.

31

II,4,1228

Nay, if thy wits run the wild-goose chase, I have
done, for thou hast more of the wild-goose in one of...

32

II,4,1234

I will bite thee by the ear for that jest.

33

II,4,1236

Thy wit is a very bitter sweeting; it is a most
sharp sauce.

34

II,4,1239

O here's a wit of cheveril, that stretches from an
inch narrow to an ell broad!

35

II,4,1243

Why, is not this better now than groaning for love?
now art thou sociable, now art thou Romeo; now art...

36

II,4,1249

Thou desirest me to stop in my tale against the hair.

37

II,4,1251

O, thou art deceived; I would have made it short:
for I was come to the whole depth of my tale; and...

38

II,4,1256

A sail, a sail!

39

II,4,1261

Good Peter, to hide her face; for her fan's the
fairer face.

40

II,4,1264

God ye good den, fair gentlewoman.

41

II,4,1266

'Tis no less, I tell you, for the bawdy hand of the
dial is now upon the prick of noon.

42

II,4,1278

Yea, is the worst well? very well took, i' faith;
wisely, wisely.

43

II,4,1283

A bawd, a bawd, a bawd! so ho!

44

II,4,1285

No hare, sir; unless a hare, sir, in a lenten pie,
that is something stale and hoar ere it be spent....

45

II,4,1297

Farewell, ancient lady; farewell,
[Singing]...

46

III,1,1503

Thou art like one of those fellows that when he
enters the confines of a tavern claps me his sword...

47

III,1,1509

Come, come, thou art as hot a Jack in thy mood as
any in Italy, and as soon moved to be moody, and as...

48

III,1,1513

Nay, an there were two such, we should have none
shortly, for one would kill the other. Thou! why,...

49

III,1,1531

The fee-simple! O simple!

50

III,1,1533

By my heel, I care not.

51

III,1,1537

And but one word with one of us? couple it with
something; make it a word and a blow.

52

III,1,1541

Could you not take some occasion without giving?

53

III,1,1543

Consort! what, dost thou make us minstrels? an
thou make minstrels of us, look to hear nothing but...

54

III,1,1551

Men's eyes were made to look, and let them gaze;
I will not budge for no man's pleasure, I.

55

III,1,1555

But I'll be hanged, sir, if he wear your livery:
Marry, go before to field, he'll be your follower;...

56

III,1,1571

O calm, dishonourable, vile submission!
Alla stoccata carries it away....

57

III,1,1576

Good king of cats, nothing but one of your nine
lives; that I mean to make bold withal, and as you...

58

III,1,1585

Come, sir, your passado.

59

III,1,1593

I am hurt.
A plague o' both your houses! I am sped....

60

III,1,1597

Ay, ay, a scratch, a scratch; marry, 'tis enough.
Where is my page? Go, villain, fetch a surgeon.

61

III,1,1601

No, 'tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a
church-door; but 'tis enough,'twill serve: ask for...

62

III,1,1611

Help me into some house, Benvolio,
Or I shall faint. A plague o' both your houses!...

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