Speeches (Lines) for Menenius Agrippa
in "Coriolanus"

Total: 162

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,47

What work's, my countrymen, in hand? where go you
With bats and clubs? The matter? speak, I pray you.

2

I,1,54

Why, masters, my good friends, mine honest neighbours,
Will you undo yourselves?

3

I,1,57

I tell you, friends, most charitable care
Have the patricians of you. For your wants,...

4

I,1,79

Either you must
Confess yourselves wondrous malicious,...

5

I,1,88

There was a time when all the body's members
Rebell'd against the belly, thus accused it:...

6

I,1,99

Sir, I shall tell you. With a kind of smile,
Which ne'er came from the lungs, but even thus—...

7

I,1,113

What then?
'Fore me, this fellow speaks! What then? what then?

8

I,1,117

Well, what then?

9

I,1,120

I will tell you
If you'll bestow a small—of what you have little—...

10

I,1,124

Note me this, good friend;
Your most grave belly was deliberate,...

11

I,1,140

'Though all at once cannot
See what I do deliver out to each,...

12

I,1,146

The senators of Rome are this good belly,
And you the mutinous members; for examine...

13

I,1,155

For that, being one o' the lowest, basest, poorest,
Of this most wise rebellion, thou go'st foremost:...

14

I,1,191

For corn at their own rates; whereof, they say,
The city is well stored.

15

I,1,206

Nay, these are almost thoroughly persuaded;
For though abundantly they lack discretion,...

16

I,1,221

What is granted them?

17

I,1,229

This is strange.

18

I,1,261

O, true-bred!

19

II,1,918

The augurer tells me we shall have news to-night.

20

II,1,920

Not according to the prayer of the people, for they
love not CORIOLANUS.

21

II,1,923

Pray you, who does the wolf love?

22

II,1,925

Ay, to devour him; as the hungry plebeians would the
noble CORIOLANUS.

23

II,1,928

He's a bear indeed, that lives like a lamb. You two
are old men: tell me one thing that I shall ask you.

24

II,1,931

In what enormity is CORIOLANUS poor in, that you two
have not in abundance?

25

II,1,936

This is strange now: do you two know how you are
censured here in the city, I mean of us o' the...

26

II,1,940

Because you talk of pride now,—will you not be angry?

27

II,1,942

Why, 'tis no great matter; for a very little thief of
occasion will rob you of a great deal of patience:...

28

II,1,949

I know you can do very little alone; for your helps
are many, or else your actions would grow wondrous...

29

II,1,957

Why, then you should discover a brace of unmeriting,
proud, violent, testy magistrates, alias fools, as...

30

II,1,961

I am known to be a humorous patrician, and one that
loves a cup of hot wine with not a drop of allaying...

31

II,1,982

You know neither me, yourselves nor any thing. You
are ambitious for poor knaves' caps and legs: you...

32

II,1,999

Our very priests must become mockers, if they shall
encounter such ridiculous subjects as you are. When...

33

II,1,1019

Ha! CORIOLANUS coming home!

34

II,1,1022

Take my cap, Jupiter, and I thank thee. Hoo!
CORIOLANUS coming home!

35

II,1,1029

I will make my very house reel tonight: a letter for
me!

36

II,1,1032

A letter for me! it gives me an estate of seven
years' health; in which time I will make a lip at...

37

II,1,1040

So do I too, if it be not too much: brings a'
victory in his pocket? the wounds become him.

38

II,1,1044

Has he disciplined Aufidius soundly?

39

II,1,1047

And 'twas time for him too, I'll warrant him that:
an he had stayed by him, I would not have been so...

40

II,1,1056

Wondrous! ay, I warrant you, and not without his
true purchasing.

41

II,1,1060

True! I'll be sworn they are true.
Where is he wounded?...

42

II,1,1069

One i' the neck, and two i' the thigh,—there's
nine that I know.

43

II,1,1073

Now it's twenty-seven: every gash was an enemy's grave.
[A shout and flourish]...

44

II,1,1108

Now, the gods crown thee!

45

II,1,1114

A hundred thousand welcomes. I could weep
And I could laugh, I am light and heavy. Welcome....

46

II,2,1266

Having determined of the Volsces and
To send for Titus TITUS, it remains,...

47

II,2,1296

That's off, that's off;
I would you rather had been silent. Please you...

48

II,2,1302

He loves your people
But tie him not to be their bedfellow....

49

II,2,1319

Pray now, sit down.

50

II,2,1324

Masters of the people,
Your multiplying spawn how can he flatter—...

51

II,2,1370

Worthy man!

52

II,2,1379

He's right noble:
Let him be call'd for.

53

II,2,1384

The senate, Coriolanus, are well pleased
To make thee consul.

54

II,2,1388

It then remains
That you do speak to the people.

55

II,2,1398

Put them not to't:
Pray you, go fit you to the custom and...

56

II,2,1410

Do not stand upon't.
We recommend to you, tribunes of the people,...

57

II,3,1473

O sir, you are not right: have you not known
The worthiest men have done't?

58

II,3,1481

O me, the gods!
You must not speak of that: you must desire them...

59

II,3,1487

You'll mar all:
I'll leave you: pray you, speak to 'em, I pray you,...

60

II,3,1574

You have stood your limitation; and the tribunes
Endue you with the people's voice: remains...

61

II,3,1588

I'll keep you company. Will you along?

62

III,1,1760

The matter?

63

III,1,1774

Be calm, be calm.

64

III,1,1800

Let's be calm.

65

III,1,1807

Not now, not now.

66

III,1,1821

Well, no more.

67

III,1,1834

What, what? his choler?

68

III,1,1872

Well, well, no more of that.

69

III,1,1899

Come, enough.

70

III,1,1954

On both sides more respect.

71

III,1,1963

What is about to be? I am out of breath;
Confusion's near; I cannot speak. You, tribunes...

72

III,1,1972

Fie, fie, fie!
This is the way to kindle, not to quench.

73

III,1,1981

And so are like to do.

74

III,1,1997

Hear me one word;
Beseech you, tribunes, hear me but a word.

75

III,1,2000

[To BRUTUS] Be that you seem, truly your
country's friend,...

76

III,1,2012

Down with that sword! Tribunes, withdraw awhile.

77

III,1,2019

Go, get you to your house; be gone, away!
All will be naught else.

78

III,1,2024

Sham it be put to that?

79

III,1,2028

For 'tis a sore upon us,
You cannot tent yourself: be gone, beseech you.

80

III,1,2034

Be gone;
Put not your worthy rage into your tongue;...

81

III,1,2048

Pray you, be gone:
I'll try whether my old wit be in request...

82

III,1,2055

His nature is too noble for the world:
He would not flatter Neptune for his trident,...

83

III,1,2064

I would they were in Tiber! What the vengeance!
Could he not speak 'em fair?

84

III,1,2070

You worthy tribunes,—

85

III,1,2080

Sir, sir,—

86

III,1,2082

Do not cry havoc, where you should but hunt
With modest warrant.

87

III,1,2086

Hear me speak:
As I do know the consul's worthiness,...

88

III,1,2090

The consul Coriolanus.

89

III,1,2093

If, by the tribunes' leave, and yours, good people,
I may be heard, I would crave a word or two;...

90

III,1,2103

Now the good gods forbid
That our renowned Rome, whose gratitude...

91

III,1,2109

O, he's a limb that has but a disease;
Mortal, to cut it off; to cure it, easy....

92

III,1,2121

The service of the foot
Being once gangrened, is not then respected...

93

III,1,2128

One word more, one word.
This tiger-footed rage, when it shall find...

94

III,1,2138

Consider this: he has been bred i' the wars
Since he could draw a sword, and is ill school'd...

95

III,1,2156

I'll bring him to you.
[To the Senators]...

96

III,2,2194

Come, come, you have been too rough, something
too rough;...

97

III,2,2204

Well said, noble woman?
Before he should thus stoop to the herd, but that...

98

III,2,2210

Return to the tribunes.

99

III,2,2212

Repent what you have spoke.

100

III,2,2223

A good demand.

101

III,2,2249

Noble lady!
Come, go with us; speak fair: you may salve so,...

102

III,2,2268

This but done,
Even as she speaks, why, their hearts were yours;...

103

III,2,2280

Only fair speech.

104

III,2,2337

Ay, but mildly.

105

III,3,2384

Calmly, I do beseech you.

106

III,3,2392

A noble wish.

107

III,3,2406

Lo, citizens, he says he is content:
The warlike service he has done, consider; think...

108

III,3,2412

Consider further,
That when he speaks not like a citizen,...

109

III,3,2430

Nay, temperately; your promise.

110

III,3,2453

Is this the promise that you made your mother?

111

IV,3,2580

That's worthily
As any ear can hear. Come, let's not weep....

112

IV,2,2607

Peace, peace; be not so loud.

113

IV,2,2630

Come, come, peace.

114

IV,2,2655

You have told them home;
And, by my troth, you have cause. You'll sup with me?

115

IV,2,2661

Fie, fie, fie!

116

IV,6,3020

Hail to you both!

117

IV,6,3025

All's well; and might have been much better, if
He could have temporized.

118

IV,6,3028

Nay, I hear nothing: his mother and his wife
Hear nothing from him.

119

IV,6,3051

I think not so.

120

IV,6,3063

'Tis Aufidius,
Who, hearing of our CORIOLANUS' banishment,...

121

IV,6,3072

Cannot be!
We have record that very well it can,...

122

IV,6,3103

This is unlikely:
He and Aufidius can no more atone...

123

IV,6,3115

What news? what news?

124

IV,6,3119

What's the news? what's the news?

125

IV,6,3123

Pray now, your news?
You have made fair work, I fear me.—Pray, your news?—...

126

IV,6,3133

You have made good work,
You and your apron-men; you that stood so up much...

127

IV,6,3139

As Hercules
Did shake down mellow fruit....

128

IV,6,3149

We are all undone, unless
The noble man have mercy.

129

IV,6,3158

'Tis true:
If he were putting to my house the brand...

130

IV,6,3167

How! Was it we? we loved him but, like beasts
And cowardly nobles, gave way unto your clusters,...

131

IV,6,3177

Here come the clusters.
And is Aufidius with him? You are they...

132

IV,6,3197

You have made
Good work, you and your cry! Shall's to the Capitol?

133

V,1,3279

No, I'll not go: you hear what he hath said
Which was sometime his general; who loved him...

134

V,1,3287

Do you hear?

135

V,1,3295

Why, so: you have made good work!
A pair of tribunes that have rack'd for Rome,...

136

V,1,3302

Very well:
Could he say less?

137

V,1,3310

For one poor grain or two!
I am one of those; his mother, wife, his child,...

138

V,1,3321

No, I'll not meddle.

139

V,1,3323

What should I do?

140

V,1,3326

Well, and say that CORIOLANUS
Return me, as Cominius is return'd,...

141

V,1,3334

I'll undertake 't:
I think he'll hear me. Yet, to bite his lip...

142

V,1,3348

Good faith, I'll prove him,
Speed how it will. I shall ere long have knowledge...

143

V,2,3371

You guard like men; 'tis well: but, by your leave,
I am an officer of state, and come...

144

V,2,3375

From Rome.

145

V,2,3380

Good my friends,
If you have heard your general talk of Rome,...

146

V,2,3386

I tell thee, fellow,
The general is my lover: I have been...

147

V,2,3401

Prithee, fellow, remember my name is Menenius,
always factionary on the party of your general.

148

V,2,3406

Has he dined, canst thou tell? for I would not
speak with him till after dinner.

149

V,2,3409

I am, as thy general is.

150

V,2,3423

Sirrah, if thy captain knew I were here, he would
use me with estimation.

151

V,2,3426

I mean, thy general.

152

V,2,3430

Nay, but, fellow, fellow,—

153

V,2,3433

Now, you companion, I'll say an errand for you:
You shall know now that I am in estimation; you shall...

154

V,2,3455

How! away!

155

V,2,3477

I neither care for the world nor your general: for
such things as you, I can scarce think there's any,...

156

V,4,3730

See you yond coign o' the Capitol, yond
corner-stone?

157

V,4,3733

If it be possible for you to displace it with your
little finger, there is some hope the ladies of...

158

V,4,3740

There is differency between a grub and a butterfly;
yet your butterfly was a grub. This CORIOLANUS is grown...

159

V,4,3745

So did he me: and he no more remembers his mother
now than an eight-year-old horse. The tartness...

160

V,4,3756

I paint him in the character. Mark what mercy his
mother shall bring from him: there is no more mercy...

161

V,4,3762

No, in such a case the gods will not be good unto
us. When we banished him, we respected not them;...

162

V,4,3788

This is good news:
I will go meet the ladies. This Volumnia...

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